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Thread: Not enough time in the day

  1. #1
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    Not enough time in the day

    I know your book touches on parents being good examples in terms of health, exercise, eatings... But I'm forever struggling with there not being enough hours in the day.

    I work full time, yet pride myself on being able to take care of DS' needs -- health, schoolwork, meals, clean clothes..; however, something always gets lost in the shuffle. Currently that's my ability to get in some exercise and it doesn't help that half the time his snack cupboard is calling my name. There's a box of Trader Joes Frosted Gingerbread Men Mocking me this week. I feel like such a slug. How can I get motivated, get into a routine?

    Okay, I'm making excuses about there not being enough hours in the day, but wintertime hits and all I want to do is hibernate once we get DS' vest, nebs, schoolwork and supper time.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    20,957

    Not enough time in the day

    I know your book touches on parents being good examples in terms of health, exercise, eatings... But I'm forever struggling with there not being enough hours in the day.

    I work full time, yet pride myself on being able to take care of DS' needs -- health, schoolwork, meals, clean clothes..; however, something always gets lost in the shuffle. Currently that's my ability to get in some exercise and it doesn't help that half the time his snack cupboard is calling my name. There's a box of Trader Joes Frosted Gingerbread Men Mocking me this week. I feel like such a slug. How can I get motivated, get into a routine?

    Okay, I'm making excuses about there not being enough hours in the day, but wintertime hits and all I want to do is hibernate once we get DS' vest, nebs, schoolwork and supper time.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    20,957

    Not enough time in the day

    I know your book touches on parents being good examples in terms of health, exercise, eatings... But I'm forever struggling with there not being enough hours in the day.

    I work full time, yet pride myself on being able to take care of DS' needs -- health, schoolwork, meals, clean clothes..; however, something always gets lost in the shuffle. Currently that's my ability to get in some exercise and it doesn't help that half the time his snack cupboard is calling my name. There's a box of Trader Joes Frosted Gingerbread Men Mocking me this week. I feel like such a slug. How can I get motivated, get into a routine?

    Okay, I'm making excuses about there not being enough hours in the day, but wintertime hits and all I want to do is hibernate once we get DS' vest, nebs, schoolwork and supper time.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    20,957

    Not enough time in the day

    I know your book touches on parents being good examples in terms of health, exercise, eatings... But I'm forever struggling with there not being enough hours in the day.

    I work full time, yet pride myself on being able to take care of DS' needs -- health, schoolwork, meals, clean clothes..; however, something always gets lost in the shuffle. Currently that's my ability to get in some exercise and it doesn't help that half the time his snack cupboard is calling my name. There's a box of Trader Joes Frosted Gingerbread Men Mocking me this week. I feel like such a slug. How can I get motivated, get into a routine?

    Okay, I'm making excuses about there not being enough hours in the day, but wintertime hits and all I want to do is hibernate once we get DS' vest, nebs, schoolwork and supper time.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    20,957

    Not enough time in the day

    I know your book touches on parents being good examples in terms of health, exercise, eatings... But I'm forever struggling with there not being enough hours in the day.
    <br />
    <br />I work full time, yet pride myself on being able to take care of DS' needs -- health, schoolwork, meals, clean clothes..; however, something always gets lost in the shuffle. Currently that's my ability to get in some exercise and it doesn't help that half the time his snack cupboard is calling my name. There's a box of Trader Joes Frosted Gingerbread Men Mocking me this week. I feel like such a slug. How can I get motivated, get into a routine?
    <br />
    <br />Okay, I'm making excuses about there not being enough hours in the day, but wintertime hits and all I want to do is hibernate once we get DS' vest, nebs, schoolwork and supper time.

  6. #6

    Not enough time in the day

    Hi Liza,
    Isn't this one of the biggest bummers of parenting- having to set a good example? I just hate looking in that ole mirror sometimes. And, honestly, just an awareness of the importance of example can motivate us to do the right things. I have found that oftentimes, parents will do things for the sake of their kids before they will do them for themselves. And so, this is just a good reminder of how important example is but not meant to cause guilt (we all have enough of that already!).

    Taking good care of ourselves when we have a special needs kid is probably the hardest thing in parenting because of the time demands on us. And, when kids are really little, it's nearly impossible. But I want to encourage those of you with young children that things do get better. Both of my kids are in school now and, although I am very busy, I do have more "mommy-time moments" available.

    But even when we don't have a block of free time, we can all do little things that "feed our souls" like: a quick bubble bath while our partner watches the kids. Or a snitch of chocolate and good coffee. Or taking a 15-minute walk around the block with the kids. Or, spending a few minutes on this website giving/getting support. These are all ways to take good care of ourselves if they are helping to renew us.

    And, even when we blow it, we can still set a good example: "Gosh, I know I'm not supposed to eat that whole box of Trader Joe's Frosted Gingerbread Men but I did. Oh bummer. But, tomorrow will be a new day and I'll do better."

    And of course when tomorrow comes we say, "Wow! I made it through a whole day without eating another box of Trader Joe's Frosted Gingerbread Men! I am so proud of myself!" :-)

    The other important part of example is not tolerating disrespect from our kids. There are good reasons for this which are on the video clip.

    I hope this gives you some ideas. Thanks for your question and honesty.
    Hugs,
    Lisa

  7. #7

    Not enough time in the day

    Hi Liza,
    Isn't this one of the biggest bummers of parenting- having to set a good example? I just hate looking in that ole mirror sometimes. And, honestly, just an awareness of the importance of example can motivate us to do the right things. I have found that oftentimes, parents will do things for the sake of their kids before they will do them for themselves. And so, this is just a good reminder of how important example is but not meant to cause guilt (we all have enough of that already!).

    Taking good care of ourselves when we have a special needs kid is probably the hardest thing in parenting because of the time demands on us. And, when kids are really little, it's nearly impossible. But I want to encourage those of you with young children that things do get better. Both of my kids are in school now and, although I am very busy, I do have more "mommy-time moments" available.

    But even when we don't have a block of free time, we can all do little things that "feed our souls" like: a quick bubble bath while our partner watches the kids. Or a snitch of chocolate and good coffee. Or taking a 15-minute walk around the block with the kids. Or, spending a few minutes on this website giving/getting support. These are all ways to take good care of ourselves if they are helping to renew us.

    And, even when we blow it, we can still set a good example: "Gosh, I know I'm not supposed to eat that whole box of Trader Joe's Frosted Gingerbread Men but I did. Oh bummer. But, tomorrow will be a new day and I'll do better."

    And of course when tomorrow comes we say, "Wow! I made it through a whole day without eating another box of Trader Joe's Frosted Gingerbread Men! I am so proud of myself!" :-)

    The other important part of example is not tolerating disrespect from our kids. There are good reasons for this which are on the video clip.

    I hope this gives you some ideas. Thanks for your question and honesty.
    Hugs,
    Lisa

  8. #8

    Not enough time in the day

    Hi Liza,
    Isn't this one of the biggest bummers of parenting- having to set a good example? I just hate looking in that ole mirror sometimes. And, honestly, just an awareness of the importance of example can motivate us to do the right things. I have found that oftentimes, parents will do things for the sake of their kids before they will do them for themselves. And so, this is just a good reminder of how important example is but not meant to cause guilt (we all have enough of that already!).

    Taking good care of ourselves when we have a special needs kid is probably the hardest thing in parenting because of the time demands on us. And, when kids are really little, it's nearly impossible. But I want to encourage those of you with young children that things do get better. Both of my kids are in school now and, although I am very busy, I do have more "mommy-time moments" available.

    But even when we don't have a block of free time, we can all do little things that "feed our souls" like: a quick bubble bath while our partner watches the kids. Or a snitch of chocolate and good coffee. Or taking a 15-minute walk around the block with the kids. Or, spending a few minutes on this website giving/getting support. These are all ways to take good care of ourselves if they are helping to renew us.

    And, even when we blow it, we can still set a good example: "Gosh, I know I'm not supposed to eat that whole box of Trader Joe's Frosted Gingerbread Men but I did. Oh bummer. But, tomorrow will be a new day and I'll do better."

    And of course when tomorrow comes we say, "Wow! I made it through a whole day without eating another box of Trader Joe's Frosted Gingerbread Men! I am so proud of myself!" :-)

    The other important part of example is not tolerating disrespect from our kids. There are good reasons for this which are on the video clip.

    I hope this gives you some ideas. Thanks for your question and honesty.
    Hugs,
    Lisa

  9. #9

    Not enough time in the day

    Hi Liza,
    Isn't this one of the biggest bummers of parenting- having to set a good example? I just hate looking in that ole mirror sometimes. And, honestly, just an awareness of the importance of example can motivate us to do the right things. I have found that oftentimes, parents will do things for the sake of their kids before they will do them for themselves. And so, this is just a good reminder of how important example is but not meant to cause guilt (we all have enough of that already!).

    Taking good care of ourselves when we have a special needs kid is probably the hardest thing in parenting because of the time demands on us. And, when kids are really little, it's nearly impossible. But I want to encourage those of you with young children that things do get better. Both of my kids are in school now and, although I am very busy, I do have more "mommy-time moments" available.

    But even when we don't have a block of free time, we can all do little things that "feed our souls" like: a quick bubble bath while our partner watches the kids. Or a snitch of chocolate and good coffee. Or taking a 15-minute walk around the block with the kids. Or, spending a few minutes on this website giving/getting support. These are all ways to take good care of ourselves if they are helping to renew us.

    And, even when we blow it, we can still set a good example: "Gosh, I know I'm not supposed to eat that whole box of Trader Joe's Frosted Gingerbread Men but I did. Oh bummer. But, tomorrow will be a new day and I'll do better."

    And of course when tomorrow comes we say, "Wow! I made it through a whole day without eating another box of Trader Joe's Frosted Gingerbread Men! I am so proud of myself!" :-)

    The other important part of example is not tolerating disrespect from our kids. There are good reasons for this which are on the video clip.

    I hope this gives you some ideas. Thanks for your question and honesty.
    Hugs,
    Lisa

  10. #10

    Not enough time in the day

    Hi Liza,
    <br />Isn't this one of the biggest bummers of parenting- having to set a good example? I just hate looking in that ole mirror sometimes. And, honestly, just an awareness of the importance of example can motivate us to do the right things. I have found that oftentimes, parents will do things for the sake of their kids before they will do them for themselves. And so, this is just a good reminder of how important example is but not meant to cause guilt (we all have enough of that already!).
    <br />
    <br />Taking good care of ourselves when we have a special needs kid is probably the hardest thing in parenting because of the time demands on us. And, when kids are really little, it's nearly impossible. But I want to encourage those of you with young children that things do get better. Both of my kids are in school now and, although I am very busy, I do have more "mommy-time moments" available.
    <br />
    <br />But even when we don't have a block of free time, we can all do little things that "feed our souls" like: a quick bubble bath while our partner watches the kids. Or a snitch of chocolate and good coffee. Or taking a 15-minute walk around the block with the kids. Or, spending a few minutes on this website giving/getting support. These are all ways to take good care of ourselves if they are helping to renew us.
    <br />
    <br />And, even when we blow it, we can still set a good example: "Gosh, I know I'm not supposed to eat that whole box of Trader Joe's Frosted Gingerbread Men but I did. Oh bummer. But, tomorrow will be a new day and I'll do better."
    <br />
    <br />And of course when tomorrow comes we say, "Wow! I made it through a whole day without eating another box of Trader Joe's Frosted Gingerbread Men! I am so proud of myself!" :-)
    <br />
    <br />The other important part of example is not tolerating disrespect from our kids. There are good reasons for this which are on the video clip.
    <br />
    <br />I hope this gives you some ideas. Thanks for your question and honesty.
    <br />Hugs,
    <br />Lisa

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