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Thread: Adults with CF what are your jobs?

  1. #11
    Junior Member
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    Feb 2018
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    I worked 18 years as a RN in surgery doing open hearts. My exposure to the sickest of patients was limited in this environment as I was constantly "scrubbing up" and wore a mask the majority of the time. I am 44 now and knew around 39 I could not work in that environment forever as the mental and physical fatigue was beninning to become taxing on my health. I returned to graduate school at 40 and for the past 3 years have worked as a senior clinical analyst for the Analytics Division of my Healthcare System. I serve as an internal consultant working with data scientists, database engineers and other analysts. I also do a fair amount of BI development and database queries. I think there are ample opportunities in the healthcare sector that minimize direct exposure to patients. Something to consider.

  2. #12
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    Hey Rubyrose, I posted a very similar scenario. I worked as an RN in surgery for many years then went back to grad school and landed a clinical analyst job in our Analytics Division. Curious what type of work do you do within IT?

  3. #13
    Junior Member
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    Dec 2016
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    My older son is a data scientist (got an MS degree in Bioinformatics) If he has an exacerbation he can work from home. Younger son desires a less cf-friendly job. We'll have to see how that pans out (he is still in college.)

  4. #14
    I'm a video producer / motion graphics animator. As I get older I'm realizing travel and "working in the field" are taking more out of me, so a few years ago I began heavily investing in learning motion graphics animation as that's something I can do from home.
    Were I to recommend a field it would easily be coding/programming/developing. Coding careers have exploded to the point where companies have more money than they do developers, so they are having to offer jobs WITH perks like working from home, etc. In a developer field you're looking at a 9ish month bootcamp, followed by 2-4 years as a junior developer working from an office, then once you leave the "Junior" level, having a LOT of authority to negotiate the ability to work from home etc.
    A friend of mine did a 6 month coding camp here in Nashville and after completion, the very first interview he went to he got a $70k/year junior dev position where he negotiated taking every other Friday off and 3 weeks vacation a year. He negotiated another raise three months later, and after 2 years plans to negotiate working from home or moving to a different company. That's how high the demand is right now in cities.
    33, ΔΔF-508- Video Producer & Motion Graphics Animator in Nashville, TN

  5. #15
    Administrator
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    Thanks for the great suggestion Lance!
    As a Math and Computer Teacher and with 12 grandchildren, I am working with them (as young as 7 yrs old) on www.tynker.com. They love it and of course I love working with them!
    I am using it with my 7-11 year olds. It goes through grammar school...14 years old. The younger ones have fun games too!

  6. #16
    Super Moderator
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    This is great! DS just got his schedule for school and he didn't get into his intro to Java Programming class, so we're looking for other alternatives.
    Parent to a child wcf double delta f508.

    Started Orkambi July 2015
    Began Symdeko August 2018

  7. #17
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    So glad it may work out for DS! My younger ones are enjoying it! They are creating characters for minecraft and doing some simple block programming. They are 6 and 9.

    Let us know if this works for DS. They have Java for the older kids. He may need help?

    Salt and Light
    Jeanne

  8. #18
    Senior Member
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    I graduated college with 2 associates degrees, Information Systems and Internet Technology in 2004. Most jobs required 1-3 years of prior experience in that field. I had never had a job. I got my first job as an Office Assistant with an Ambulance Transport Service. I did that for 3 years until my health began to decline in 2007. I needed a transplant in 2012. By the time I returned home in better health (not completely healthy) in 2013 everything I learned in college was obsolete. Technology moves incredibly fast. When I graduated there were no tablets or smartphones. I looked into Medical Transcription but computer software is quickly taking over that field. Medical Billing & Coding is a good career choice but you have to continually keep your education since the rules change a lot (I did some at my job). It can be stressful. A lot of Coding jobs can be on site. So if it's with a doctors office, he would have to be there. Most people dont work from home from the start. Plus he may have to go on site for some training.

  9. #19
    Junior Member
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    Feb 2019
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    I'm currently an administrative assistant, but am looking for other jobs. Possibly staying an administrative assistant but changing company's.

  10. #20
    Junior Member
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    Sep 2019
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    I'm a solar engineer, degree in Mechanical Engineering.
    I thought similarly when I was in high school, thinking I shouldn't pursue anything physically demanding. Working from home didn't really exist at the time and I wouldn't necessarily pursue a career with that in mind. I've made some great friends having a work-place to go to.
    I don't know how old your son is, but I believe the treatments available and upcoming will be a gamechanger for the generation growing up now. I had doubts I'd live through college and now I'm 41, so I'm not as delicate as I thought. I recommend kids pursue whatever they're interested in, especially when young. Learning 3D printing teaches many great skills, computer modeling, spatial visualization, etc. I was learning drums, which I turned into a nice hobby and had fun playing some live shows, never expecting it to be my career. Marketable skills are great, but having varied interests makes for a more interesting human.
    Eric

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