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Thread: sweating in the night

  1. #11
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    Night sweats and hot flashes with or without drenching sweats are very common in CF. At some time nearly all CFers experience them. It can be chronic or episodic. Chronic sweats may wax and wane, but it's always an issue. There's a CF issue causing this, but I'm getting ahead of myself. Episodes of sweats have a less direct trigger like certain infections. For example, the mini series, "Downton Abbey", in the pre-antibiotic days, one of the daughters is brought back from the brink of death with a large injection of adrenaline, epinephrine, the ultimate stimulant of the immune system. CFers are generally taxed out on stress hormones. The result of stress hormones surging throughout the body can cause sweats.

    The cause is simple, we have CF. The exact trigger most likely changes depending on what is the current severity of the many battles going on in our bodies. Infections are being fought all over the body of a CFer. Unofficial statistics indicate that for most of the life of a CFer, an illness knocks us down fast and the recovery is equally fast, most times. We are often thin and though we're not great at digestion and absorption of nutrients, the fact remains that we need far more calories than a person not fighting infection, inefficiencies in the transportation of everything from hormones to water and oxygen. Most of us are hypermetabolic despite tests that say we're not. I have two friends who are too thin, that I do amateur (unlicensed) physical therapy and massage. One has CF and the other is the victim of PEM or Protein Energy Malnutrition. It becomes obvious that I am a heater, as are my grateful charges. The amount of body heat emanating from two thin people is astonishing. I've got to believe that I am in good company, most parents and young adults are aware of this phenomenon. Add the fact that the normal cooling system people use, sweating, doesn't work when we need it to.

    We live in a kind of cold war with stockpiles of antibodies, antigens and fighter cells, far exceeding the amounts a healthy non CFer would possess. The sheer volume of bacterial infections in a CFers lungs, head, and the endocrine system is astonishing. Our gut, mostly the GI tract keeps our immunity on Red Alert by routinely introducing the body to novel infections for the body to design antibodies or eliminate the test infections via fighter cells like lymphocytes and lukocytes. This is a natural function of the gut and it occurs in everybody, CF or not. It helps us understand why it's called the center of our immune system.

    Whether it's a lung infection or a battle of thick mucus trying to transport hormones in the thyroid gland or the adrenal glands and kidneys, these are triggers that result in sweats. I believe that the connection with the autonomic (sympathetic/parasympathetic) nervous system is a major factor behind this. CF is deeply connected to the autonomic or Vagus nerve system. Think about it. Lung pain, minus the bronchials, doesn't hurt directly. The pain may refer to the back, sometimes the ribs, but not the lungs. Pancreatitis and Cholestasis might be painful where the organs are, but most often the gallbladder feels like an epic case of heartburn, or a burp/belch caught up high in the stomach. I had one that sent me to the ED because of the similarity to a heart attack. Both the gallbladder and pancreas refer pain to the back, around or between the shoulder blades. Both feel like heartburn, called epigastric pain. The sinuses and the GI tract show pain more directly, and infection can easily translate to night sweats.

    All of this is common sense and sometimes it just doesn't feel like the cause. I researched this about a year ago because of people suffering from sweating calves, ankles and feet, or forearms and hands. Do all CFers have sweaty clammy palms and soles? I am really interested, seriously. Back in 2012 I had some event that ended in the ED. My personal guess was a thyroid storm but they didn't run a thyroid assay so I will never know. The sweating of my hands and feet was a medical mystery. I held my hand above a measuring cup and within two minutes, I had sweat a quarter cup of super salty water. My shoes were ruined as they filled and overflowed with the same salty solution.

    It turns out that our thyroid gland does more than wrap around the lower pharanx/larynx. The thyroid gland hangs like a beard, entwined around the wind pipe, it transitions from interconnected thyroid nodules to lymph nodes. Lymph nodes fill a large amount of the chest, clustered around the heart and lungs.

    The odd population of thyroid nodules and lymph nodes in an area generally under attack by allergens, and infection and the results can be a bizarre response of calf-to-sole and arm-to-palm sweats, often at night. This is for real and not funny in the least. I haven't been able to find research connecting this phenomenon to night sweats, but by being mostly a night sweat of the outer limbs, I believe they are related. This isn't a phenomenon for CF alone. Most people who have this condition are dealing with a chronic illness as well, so immunity and the autonomic system are likely the root.

    Look into cool pillows and my favorite, a tent frame for the feet. Anyone who has had foot surgery or any reason to keep the covers off the feet has seen them. Medical appliance stores sell the frames. Good hydration, including balanced electrolytes can't hurt.

    Hope this helps,

    LL
    66 yr. old man, DX CF 2002 by sweat test. Heterozygous S1235R revealed by genetic testing in 2003 & 2012 accepted secondary mutation. 7T, 7T polymorphism appears to be virulent.

  2. #12
    Senior Member
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    Jun 2011
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    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by LittleLab4CF View Post
    Night sweats and hot flashes with or without drenching sweats are very common in CF. At some time nearly all CFers experience them. It can be chronic or episodic. Chronic sweats may wax and wane, but it's always an issue. There's a CF issue causing this, but I'm getting ahead of myself. Episodes of sweats have a less direct trigger like certain infections. For example, the mini series, "Downton Abbey", in the pre-antibiotic days, one of the daughters is brought back from the brink of death with a large injection of adrenaline, epinephrine, the ultimate stimulant of the immune system. CFers are generally taxed out on stress hormones. The result of stress hormones surging throughout the body can cause sweats.

    The cause is simple, we have CF. The exact trigger most likely changes depending on what is the current severity of the many battles going on in our bodies. Infections are being fought all over the body of a CFer. Unofficial statistics indicate that for most of the life of a CFer, an illness knocks us down fast and the recovery is equally fast, most times. We are often thin and though we're not great at digestion and absorption of nutrients, the fact remains that we need far more calories than a person not fighting infection, inefficiencies in the transportation of everything from hormones to water and oxygen. Most of us are hypermetabolic despite tests that say we're not. I have two friends who are too thin, that I do amateur (unlicensed) physical therapy and massage. One has CF and the other is the victim of PEM or Protein Energy Malnutrition. It becomes obvious that I am a heater, as are my grateful charges. The amount of body heat emanating from two thin people is astonishing. I've got to believe that I am in good company, most parents and young adults are aware of this phenomenon. Add the fact that the normal cooling system people use, sweating, doesn't work when we need it to.

    We live in a kind of cold war with stockpiles of antibodies, antigens and fighter cells, far exceeding the amounts a healthy non CFer would possess. The sheer volume of bacterial infections in a CFers lungs, head, and the endocrine system is astonishing. Our gut, mostly the GI tract keeps our immunity on Red Alert by routinely introducing the body to novel infections for the body to design antibodies or eliminate the test infections via fighter cells like lymphocytes and lukocytes. This is a natural function of the gut and it occurs in everybody, CF or not. It helps us understand why it's called the center of our immune system.

    Whether it's a lung infection or a battle of thick mucus trying to transport hormones in the thyroid gland or the adrenal glands and kidneys, these are triggers that result in sweats. I believe that the connection with the autonomic (sympathetic/parasympathetic) nervous system is a major factor behind this. CF is deeply connected to the autonomic or Vagus nerve system. Think about it. Lung pain, minus the bronchials, doesn't hurt directly. The pain may refer to the back, sometimes the ribs, but not the lungs. Pancreatitis and Cholestasis might be painful where the organs are, but most often the gallbladder feels like an epic case of heartburn, or a burp/belch caught up high in the stomach. I had one that sent me to the ED because of the similarity to a heart attack. Both the gallbladder and pancreas refer pain to the back, around or between the shoulder blades. Both feel like heartburn, called epigastric pain. The sinuses and the GI tract show pain more directly, and infection can easily translate to night sweats.

    All of this is common sense and sometimes it just doesn't feel like the cause. I researched this about a year ago because of people suffering from sweating calves, ankles and feet, or forearms and hands. Do all CFers have sweaty clammy palms and soles? I am really interested, seriously. Back in 2012 I had some event that ended in the ED. My personal guess was a thyroid storm but they didn't run a thyroid assay so I will never know. The sweating of my hands and feet was a medical mystery. I held my hand above a measuring cup and within two minutes, I had sweat a quarter cup of super salty water. My shoes were ruined as they filled and overflowed with the same salty solution.

    It turns out that our thyroid gland does more than wrap around the lower pharanx/larynx. The thyroid gland hangs like a beard, entwined around the wind pipe, it transitions from interconnected thyroid nodules to lymph nodes. Lymph nodes fill a large amount of the chest, clustered around the heart and lungs.

    The odd population of thyroid nodules and lymph nodes in an area generally under attack by allergens, and infection and the results can be a bizarre response of calf-to-sole and arm-to-palm sweats, often at night. This is for real and not funny in the least. I haven't been able to find research connecting this phenomenon to night sweats, but by being mostly a night sweat of the outer limbs, I believe they are related. This isn't a phenomenon for CF alone. Most people who have this condition are dealing with a chronic illness as well, so immunity and the autonomic system are likely the root.

    Look into cool pillows and my favorite, a tent frame for the feet. Anyone who has had foot surgery or any reason to keep the covers off the feet has seen them. Medical appliance stores sell the frames. Good hydration, including balanced electrolytes can't hurt.

    Hope this helps,

    LL
    Thanks LL. I am not a CFer who is thin. I am overweight and have great difficulty losing. Anyway, my feet do sweat like crazy - never put that together with CF. That makes sense. Yes have episodes of night sweats, as you say. I also do NOT bounce back from illness quickly at all! I have been sick for 9 weeks with upper respiratory illness. Was sweating at the start. Then it stopped. Now sweating again. Thanks for the info.
    ~ Simba15
    55 year old, diagnosed at age 50 (yup! No docs believed me b/c I "look healthy").

  3. #13
    Senior Member
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    Jun 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Printer View Post
    Simba:

    If it is not "a woman thing", it could be MAC. Microbacterical Atrium Complex (sp). You should discuss this with your CF Doctor.

    Bill
    Printer:what are the symptoms of your MAC? Is it trreatable? Sorry to hear you have an other dx!
    ~ Simba15
    55 year old, diagnosed at age 50 (yup! No docs believed me b/c I "look healthy").

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    2,696
    MAC, in the past was called ATYPICAL TB. Basically TB but not contagious. It is treated with a cocktail of 3 antibiotics for up to 9 months. Does cause night sweats and is upper respiratory. In Massachusetts, it requires a sputum sample to be sent to the state lab for dx.

    Actually I had it twice over 30 years and I'm free from it now.

    Bill
    Male 77 CF undetected until age 47. (First symptoms at age 3) Delta F508 & V562I with one copy of Variant 5T. 100% PI. MAC, CFRD.

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