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Thread: I was treated like a freak

  1. #11
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    I know . . . for the kiddos, write "Ninja in Training" on it and bring their nun chucks! Any other suggestions?

  2. #12
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    What an awesome idea! I googled and found this hilarious one!https://www.google.com/search?q=how+...u1%3B597%3B390

  3. #13
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    I was just thinking we stumbled on a million dollar idea; decorative hospital masks. Then I googled it and realized there are a million already to choose from.

    Anyway, I found a couple for me:

    https://www.etsy.com/listing/2005044...-shop-header-3
    https://www.etsy.com/listing/2000642...?ref=related-7
    Thirtysomething Dad of three (IVFw/ICSI), Mormon, Engineer in Utah.
    I was dx at 1 yr (failure to thrive), D▲F508, FEV1~94%, PA and MSSA, PI.
    2 brothers w/CF, 3 siblings w/out. My wife and parents are saints.

  4. #14
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    Okay, we're totally going to do the bad piggies from angry birds as we have green masks and a few black snot marks will do the job!!!

  5. #15
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    Oh wow! Great links everyone! I love it! We should post pictures!

  6. #16
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    Here's a thought - kids, preteens, and teens often feel very comfortable wearing full face masks. They're primed for it by Halloween and crafts made in school, etc. I wonder if you could make a FULL face mask in fabric, sporting a character they would enjoy, but which would perform the same function as these half face masks - keeping germs in and out. More than once I've had a child sport their cape and mask or school made holiday mask into stores and while otherwise out and about. They love it. Even teens could go "goth" or sport a skeleton or Enderman, etc. Then you could take it home, wash it, and reuse. I'll have to check with the docs on the permeability of various fabrics by all those little germs we're trying to avoid. . . .

  7. #17
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    That's a grat idea, but nt sure hat is needed for th germ control.. We actually use the n30 masks because my research indicated that those work better than the plain ones masks and I want to say cff said evidence was inconclusive on the need which I think means there is some evidence n30 masks work better. Ds was young enough when we started that it neither bothers or fazes him.

  8. #18
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    https://www.osha.gov/Publications/re...factsheet.html

    this link explains the difference between surgical masks (and notes that what it is made of matters) and "respirators", i.e., n30 masks, fyi.

  9. #19
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    First, I'm sorry that you're feeling singled out or profiled. My first thought was to draw a mouth on it just to be contrary. It seems like it wasn't an original idea. You could move to Asia. When I first traveled to Japan and other coastal areas of the Orient, it was like fashion to wear hospital masks.

    Some of the masks had obvious functions like working in a toll booth, avoiding the ever present soot from charcoal used to heat small homes/apartments and diesel exhaust. Mostly Asian's seem to hate dust or any itchy feeling in the nasal pathway. I'm not Asian but I was really surprised how many Asian friends made identical remarks about this sensitivity. It's a big deal for many. It's a lot more polluted too. Not to pick on China but from 1984 until I stopped international travel in 2000 China's economy has grown annually, in double digit increases in GDP. The coastal countries east of China are more or less down wind. From 1990 on, I saw the sun in Seoul once in the total of a year's worth of visits. By 1995 everybody wore masks. You could see the smog billowing over the gigantic Han river that ran through Seoul.

    Back when SARS virus was at threat levels similar to the current (idiotic) horse out of the barn climate currently going on with Ebola, big signs were going up in ED's and hospitals asking to report any travel to Africa and a form you fill out with more questions about this potential travel. The news will die down, signs will be removed and life will go back to ignoring travel information until the next super bug shows up in Shanghai or Phuket, both places among a hundred I've been to that is the stuff of nightmares for epidemiologists.

    During the SARS scare I remember watching a live news broadcast from the international terminal's last desk, quarantine, before foreign flights first walked onto American soil, or carpet in this case. The report was embarrassing. A Korean Air flight had deplaned its passengers and the reporter were in the spotlight with the lonely quarantine desk sat with one attendant. The reporter was acting incensed over the lack of action. Just as a woman was walking by wearing a surgical mask she pointed at her, and the spotlighted camera followed as she expressed "Like why aren't they checking this woman"? Where's Heraldo Rivera when you need him, Asians and smart travelers that are accustomed to the super humidity of coastal air, conserve moisture loss with a cloth or mask while in the 10% relative humidity on a 14 hour flight. Landing in Denver is no improvement with our high altitude, dry hard boogers have been part of a cultural lecture when we had foreign visitors from coastal regions. My point is at least in the clinic, everybody knows it is smart to wear a mask. You don't need to educate the whole world. That's why we have Heraldo.

    I no longer wish to travel but when I did, international travelers were generally quite savvy with regard to what epidemics and health issues are happening in the countries we planned to visit. International travelers are usually vaccinated against many more diseases than the average person and we know when a region has a problem, information and warnings are printed and distributed prior to arrival and again during the departure journey, presumably back to one's home country. The forms asked for details of travel, counties visited, contact with animals or agricultural levels of plants, visited farms, ranches or plantations and so forth. It also always included a warning to seek medical attention with symptoms described in the form including proper protocol like calling the CDC or equivalent in each country first, including the phone numbers.



    Caution is running high. One of the more common problems with clinics, hospitals and doctors offices is infectious diseases that patients are in to have taken care of. Duh! We are aware of this but like the concept of hospital isolation, most people don't realize that isolation is for protecting the patient and rarely to protect the healthy and unhealthy on the outside. I really wish I could offer a better solution. You are sensitive to how you believe people feel or act toward you. You are also pretty brave to express your feelings about things you are sensitive about. Every dog has his day if that is any comfort. We all eventually suffer the same little indignities. My experience has been that it only takes one good face plant to soften a judging gaze.

    LL
    67yr. old man, DX CF 2002 by sweat test. Heterozygous S1235R revealed by genetic testing in 2003 & 2012 accepted secondary mutation. 7T, 7T polymorphism established to be virulent. Classification review in 2017 remains CF diagnosis.

    Complete pancreatic atrophy, Bronchiectasis, MRSA, osteoporosis, small duct disease, charming personality.

  10. #20
    cfgf28
    Guest
    When my fiance goes to the clinic, which is a wing of the hospital, he has to wear a mask, and it does feel embarrassing. And he's almost always the only one singled out and told to wear one. He's seen in a lung clinic, but they see patients with asthma etc...I've seen maybe 1 or 2 other people with a mask when we've gone...I get it, but it still makes you feel weird. What really bothered me was when the receptionist was coughing, choking etc, clearly sick, and not wearing a mask....and takes forever to check you in, scan your insurance cards etc. I really wanted to say maybe you should be home since your clearly sicker than the patients.

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