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jfarel
08-06-2007, 02:48 PM
With the news about laser printers polluting office environments, I've been growing increasingly concerned about the quality of the air in my office. While I am temporarily working satellite until they move the printer, I'm thinking of investing in a hepa air filter for my very small (apprx. 8x10) office.

Anyone have any recommendations?

I realize the best hepa air filters cost around 800 dollars, but I don't think I need something that large for my office. I'm not buying one of those ionic breezes or other air ionizers because they haven't been proven to work and the put potentially harmful ozone into the air.

jfarel
08-06-2007, 02:48 PM
With the news about laser printers polluting office environments, I've been growing increasingly concerned about the quality of the air in my office. While I am temporarily working satellite until they move the printer, I'm thinking of investing in a hepa air filter for my very small (apprx. 8x10) office.

Anyone have any recommendations?

I realize the best hepa air filters cost around 800 dollars, but I don't think I need something that large for my office. I'm not buying one of those ionic breezes or other air ionizers because they haven't been proven to work and the put potentially harmful ozone into the air.

jfarel
08-06-2007, 02:48 PM
With the news about laser printers polluting office environments, I've been growing increasingly concerned about the quality of the air in my office. While I am temporarily working satellite until they move the printer, I'm thinking of investing in a hepa air filter for my very small (apprx. 8x10) office.

Anyone have any recommendations?

I realize the best hepa air filters cost around 800 dollars, but I don't think I need something that large for my office. I'm not buying one of those ionic breezes or other air ionizers because they haven't been proven to work and the put potentially harmful ozone into the air.

jfarel
08-06-2007, 02:48 PM
With the news about laser printers polluting office environments, I've been growing increasingly concerned about the quality of the air in my office. While I am temporarily working satellite until they move the printer, I'm thinking of investing in a hepa air filter for my very small (apprx. 8x10) office.

Anyone have any recommendations?

I realize the best hepa air filters cost around 800 dollars, but I don't think I need something that large for my office. I'm not buying one of those ionic breezes or other air ionizers because they haven't been proven to work and the put potentially harmful ozone into the air.

jfarel
08-06-2007, 02:48 PM
With the news about laser printers polluting office environments, I've been growing increasingly concerned about the quality of the air in my office. While I am temporarily working satellite until they move the printer, I'm thinking of investing in a hepa air filter for my very small (apprx. 8x10) office.

Anyone have any recommendations?

I realize the best hepa air filters cost around 800 dollars, but I don't think I need something that large for my office. I'm not buying one of those ionic breezes or other air ionizers because they haven't been proven to work and the put potentially harmful ozone into the air.

Ratatosk
08-06-2007, 02:52 PM
I've got a whirlpool whispersure, which was one of the top rated ones. It was a gift from a family member -- still a few hundred dollars though.

Some of my coworkers have hunter or huntington brands from their local home improvement store. Think I've also seen them at Target.

Ratatosk
08-06-2007, 02:52 PM
I've got a whirlpool whispersure, which was one of the top rated ones. It was a gift from a family member -- still a few hundred dollars though.

Some of my coworkers have hunter or huntington brands from their local home improvement store. Think I've also seen them at Target.

Ratatosk
08-06-2007, 02:52 PM
I've got a whirlpool whispersure, which was one of the top rated ones. It was a gift from a family member -- still a few hundred dollars though.

Some of my coworkers have hunter or huntington brands from their local home improvement store. Think I've also seen them at Target.

Ratatosk
08-06-2007, 02:52 PM
I've got a whirlpool whispersure, which was one of the top rated ones. It was a gift from a family member -- still a few hundred dollars though.

Some of my coworkers have hunter or huntington brands from their local home improvement store. Think I've also seen them at Target.

Ratatosk
08-06-2007, 02:52 PM
I've got a whirlpool whispersure, which was one of the top rated ones. It was a gift from a family member -- still a few hundred dollars though.

Some of my coworkers have hunter or huntington brands from their local home improvement store. Think I've also seen them at Target.

lightNlife
08-06-2007, 04:03 PM
As an air quality scientist, I professionally and personally recommend the Bionaire HEPA tower. It's the best quality for the price. Last I checked it was under $200 I've been really satisfied with it, especially since the addition of a new pet. I'm allergic to mold and dust mites, and haven't had nearly as many problems during the night since we got the Bionaire HEPA tower. It does have an ionizing function, but that's optional. We leave it turned off. It's nice and quiet, and even on the lowest setting it does a great job. It also has a light to let you know when the filters need replacing, so there's no guesswork there either.

lightNlife
08-06-2007, 04:03 PM
As an air quality scientist, I professionally and personally recommend the Bionaire HEPA tower. It's the best quality for the price. Last I checked it was under $200 I've been really satisfied with it, especially since the addition of a new pet. I'm allergic to mold and dust mites, and haven't had nearly as many problems during the night since we got the Bionaire HEPA tower. It does have an ionizing function, but that's optional. We leave it turned off. It's nice and quiet, and even on the lowest setting it does a great job. It also has a light to let you know when the filters need replacing, so there's no guesswork there either.

lightNlife
08-06-2007, 04:03 PM
As an air quality scientist, I professionally and personally recommend the Bionaire HEPA tower. It's the best quality for the price. Last I checked it was under $200 I've been really satisfied with it, especially since the addition of a new pet. I'm allergic to mold and dust mites, and haven't had nearly as many problems during the night since we got the Bionaire HEPA tower. It does have an ionizing function, but that's optional. We leave it turned off. It's nice and quiet, and even on the lowest setting it does a great job. It also has a light to let you know when the filters need replacing, so there's no guesswork there either.

lightNlife
08-06-2007, 04:03 PM
As an air quality scientist, I professionally and personally recommend the Bionaire HEPA tower. It's the best quality for the price. Last I checked it was under $200 I've been really satisfied with it, especially since the addition of a new pet. I'm allergic to mold and dust mites, and haven't had nearly as many problems during the night since we got the Bionaire HEPA tower. It does have an ionizing function, but that's optional. We leave it turned off. It's nice and quiet, and even on the lowest setting it does a great job. It also has a light to let you know when the filters need replacing, so there's no guesswork there either.

lightNlife
08-06-2007, 04:03 PM
As an air quality scientist, I professionally and personally recommend the Bionaire HEPA tower. It's the best quality for the price. Last I checked it was under $200 I've been really satisfied with it, especially since the addition of a new pet. I'm allergic to mold and dust mites, and haven't had nearly as many problems during the night since we got the Bionaire HEPA tower. It does have an ionizing function, but that's optional. We leave it turned off. It's nice and quiet, and even on the lowest setting it does a great job. It also has a light to let you know when the filters need replacing, so there's no guesswork there either.

Alyssa
08-06-2007, 07:51 PM
We are the proud owners of three Austin Air Air Purifiers with HEPA filter. We got the first one off eBay and the last two from alerg.com they have excellent customer service, the last two units were shipped out on the same day as ordered and arrived quickly.

Alyssa
08-06-2007, 07:51 PM
We are the proud owners of three Austin Air Air Purifiers with HEPA filter. We got the first one off eBay and the last two from alerg.com they have excellent customer service, the last two units were shipped out on the same day as ordered and arrived quickly.

Alyssa
08-06-2007, 07:51 PM
We are the proud owners of three Austin Air Air Purifiers with HEPA filter. We got the first one off eBay and the last two from alerg.com they have excellent customer service, the last two units were shipped out on the same day as ordered and arrived quickly.

Alyssa
08-06-2007, 07:51 PM
We are the proud owners of three Austin Air Air Purifiers with HEPA filter. We got the first one off eBay and the last two from alerg.com they have excellent customer service, the last two units were shipped out on the same day as ordered and arrived quickly.

Alyssa
08-06-2007, 07:51 PM
We are the proud owners of three Austin Air Air Purifiers with HEPA filter. We got the first one off eBay and the last two from alerg.com they have excellent customer service, the last two units were shipped out on the same day as ordered and arrived quickly.

paws
08-08-2007, 05:45 PM
I too am trying to decide which hepa air cleaner/purifier to purchase.

LightNlife, with the Bionaire Hepa tower, I noticed it claims to filter out 99% of air contaminants compared to many other Hepa filters which claim to clean 99.97 or so. Can you give us more information on the differences? I don't mind spending more if the bigger cleaners are better (austin, etc.), but don't know if it's worth it or not. Also, I am confused that blueair (also pricey) is recommended by so many allergy sites and also some literature my allergist gave me, but it's an ionizer type (not like the sharper image ionizer, but still not hepa), if I understand clearly.

It all gets pretty confusing for me.

paws
08-08-2007, 05:45 PM
I too am trying to decide which hepa air cleaner/purifier to purchase.

LightNlife, with the Bionaire Hepa tower, I noticed it claims to filter out 99% of air contaminants compared to many other Hepa filters which claim to clean 99.97 or so. Can you give us more information on the differences? I don't mind spending more if the bigger cleaners are better (austin, etc.), but don't know if it's worth it or not. Also, I am confused that blueair (also pricey) is recommended by so many allergy sites and also some literature my allergist gave me, but it's an ionizer type (not like the sharper image ionizer, but still not hepa), if I understand clearly.

It all gets pretty confusing for me.

paws
08-08-2007, 05:45 PM
I too am trying to decide which hepa air cleaner/purifier to purchase.

LightNlife, with the Bionaire Hepa tower, I noticed it claims to filter out 99% of air contaminants compared to many other Hepa filters which claim to clean 99.97 or so. Can you give us more information on the differences? I don't mind spending more if the bigger cleaners are better (austin, etc.), but don't know if it's worth it or not. Also, I am confused that blueair (also pricey) is recommended by so many allergy sites and also some literature my allergist gave me, but it's an ionizer type (not like the sharper image ionizer, but still not hepa), if I understand clearly.

It all gets pretty confusing for me.

paws
08-08-2007, 05:45 PM
I too am trying to decide which hepa air cleaner/purifier to purchase.

LightNlife, with the Bionaire Hepa tower, I noticed it claims to filter out 99% of air contaminants compared to many other Hepa filters which claim to clean 99.97 or so. Can you give us more information on the differences? I don't mind spending more if the bigger cleaners are better (austin, etc.), but don't know if it's worth it or not. Also, I am confused that blueair (also pricey) is recommended by so many allergy sites and also some literature my allergist gave me, but it's an ionizer type (not like the sharper image ionizer, but still not hepa), if I understand clearly.

It all gets pretty confusing for me.

paws
08-08-2007, 05:45 PM
I too am trying to decide which hepa air cleaner/purifier to purchase.

LightNlife, with the Bionaire Hepa tower, I noticed it claims to filter out 99% of air contaminants compared to many other Hepa filters which claim to clean 99.97 or so. Can you give us more information on the differences? I don't mind spending more if the bigger cleaners are better (austin, etc.), but don't know if it's worth it or not. Also, I am confused that blueair (also pricey) is recommended by so many allergy sites and also some literature my allergist gave me, but it's an ionizer type (not like the sharper image ionizer, but still not hepa), if I understand clearly.

It all gets pretty confusing for me.

lightNlife
08-08-2007, 06:30 PM
There is a difference between an air purifier and an air filter.

<b>Air filters</b>: these trap airborne contaminants such as dust, mold spores, pollen, etc. in a physical way. Think of it like the lint trap in your dryer. When the contaminants are pulled out of the air, they are trapped by the filter.

<b>Air purifiers</b>: these are the type that use an ionization process. What ionizing does is act on the part of the airborne contaminant that causes an unpleasant oder. It works sort of like a magnet. Two metal plates inside the unit will act as a force field upon any particles that get between them. When it "ionizes" these particles, the molecules can actually be pulled apart because of the charge. No longer in their original form, they don't smell. Ionizing units are great for removing musty smells, cigarette smoke, cooking odors, and basically anything else that is airborne and stinky.

When evaluating filters based on which percentage of stuff they remove, you'll see numbers like 99.9% or higher. The obvious answer would be to simply choose the unit with the higher percentage, right? Honestly, you're not going to notice much of a difference between 99 and 99.97 because it's really just a marketing tactic. I'm a little rusty on the specifics, but from what I recall here's how they arrive at those numbers:

Say you've got 1000 particles floating around, and they get sucked into a HEPA filter. The first pass through the filter will remove 99% of those particles. That leaves only 10 particles. Filter again and you remove 99% of those...leaving you with (theoretically) less than 1 particle. See how that works?

Basically, if you're using a <b>HEPA filter</b> in a small, indoor room and one that isn't heavily exposed to airborne pollution, 99% filtration is fine. Unless you're a smoker or leave your windows open 8 hours of the day, you can get by with 99%.

As long as you're using a HEPA filter, you'll be fine. Keep it in the room where you spend most of your time--for many people that's their bedroom.

lightNlife
08-08-2007, 06:30 PM
There is a difference between an air purifier and an air filter.

<b>Air filters</b>: these trap airborne contaminants such as dust, mold spores, pollen, etc. in a physical way. Think of it like the lint trap in your dryer. When the contaminants are pulled out of the air, they are trapped by the filter.

<b>Air purifiers</b>: these are the type that use an ionization process. What ionizing does is act on the part of the airborne contaminant that causes an unpleasant oder. It works sort of like a magnet. Two metal plates inside the unit will act as a force field upon any particles that get between them. When it "ionizes" these particles, the molecules can actually be pulled apart because of the charge. No longer in their original form, they don't smell. Ionizing units are great for removing musty smells, cigarette smoke, cooking odors, and basically anything else that is airborne and stinky.

When evaluating filters based on which percentage of stuff they remove, you'll see numbers like 99.9% or higher. The obvious answer would be to simply choose the unit with the higher percentage, right? Honestly, you're not going to notice much of a difference between 99 and 99.97 because it's really just a marketing tactic. I'm a little rusty on the specifics, but from what I recall here's how they arrive at those numbers:

Say you've got 1000 particles floating around, and they get sucked into a HEPA filter. The first pass through the filter will remove 99% of those particles. That leaves only 10 particles. Filter again and you remove 99% of those...leaving you with (theoretically) less than 1 particle. See how that works?

Basically, if you're using a <b>HEPA filter</b> in a small, indoor room and one that isn't heavily exposed to airborne pollution, 99% filtration is fine. Unless you're a smoker or leave your windows open 8 hours of the day, you can get by with 99%.

As long as you're using a HEPA filter, you'll be fine. Keep it in the room where you spend most of your time--for many people that's their bedroom.

lightNlife
08-08-2007, 06:30 PM
There is a difference between an air purifier and an air filter.

<b>Air filters</b>: these trap airborne contaminants such as dust, mold spores, pollen, etc. in a physical way. Think of it like the lint trap in your dryer. When the contaminants are pulled out of the air, they are trapped by the filter.

<b>Air purifiers</b>: these are the type that use an ionization process. What ionizing does is act on the part of the airborne contaminant that causes an unpleasant oder. It works sort of like a magnet. Two metal plates inside the unit will act as a force field upon any particles that get between them. When it "ionizes" these particles, the molecules can actually be pulled apart because of the charge. No longer in their original form, they don't smell. Ionizing units are great for removing musty smells, cigarette smoke, cooking odors, and basically anything else that is airborne and stinky.

When evaluating filters based on which percentage of stuff they remove, you'll see numbers like 99.9% or higher. The obvious answer would be to simply choose the unit with the higher percentage, right? Honestly, you're not going to notice much of a difference between 99 and 99.97 because it's really just a marketing tactic. I'm a little rusty on the specifics, but from what I recall here's how they arrive at those numbers:

Say you've got 1000 particles floating around, and they get sucked into a HEPA filter. The first pass through the filter will remove 99% of those particles. That leaves only 10 particles. Filter again and you remove 99% of those...leaving you with (theoretically) less than 1 particle. See how that works?

Basically, if you're using a <b>HEPA filter</b> in a small, indoor room and one that isn't heavily exposed to airborne pollution, 99% filtration is fine. Unless you're a smoker or leave your windows open 8 hours of the day, you can get by with 99%.

As long as you're using a HEPA filter, you'll be fine. Keep it in the room where you spend most of your time--for many people that's their bedroom.

lightNlife
08-08-2007, 06:30 PM
There is a difference between an air purifier and an air filter.

<b>Air filters</b>: these trap airborne contaminants such as dust, mold spores, pollen, etc. in a physical way. Think of it like the lint trap in your dryer. When the contaminants are pulled out of the air, they are trapped by the filter.

<b>Air purifiers</b>: these are the type that use an ionization process. What ionizing does is act on the part of the airborne contaminant that causes an unpleasant oder. It works sort of like a magnet. Two metal plates inside the unit will act as a force field upon any particles that get between them. When it "ionizes" these particles, the molecules can actually be pulled apart because of the charge. No longer in their original form, they don't smell. Ionizing units are great for removing musty smells, cigarette smoke, cooking odors, and basically anything else that is airborne and stinky.

When evaluating filters based on which percentage of stuff they remove, you'll see numbers like 99.9% or higher. The obvious answer would be to simply choose the unit with the higher percentage, right? Honestly, you're not going to notice much of a difference between 99 and 99.97 because it's really just a marketing tactic. I'm a little rusty on the specifics, but from what I recall here's how they arrive at those numbers:

Say you've got 1000 particles floating around, and they get sucked into a HEPA filter. The first pass through the filter will remove 99% of those particles. That leaves only 10 particles. Filter again and you remove 99% of those...leaving you with (theoretically) less than 1 particle. See how that works?

Basically, if you're using a <b>HEPA filter</b> in a small, indoor room and one that isn't heavily exposed to airborne pollution, 99% filtration is fine. Unless you're a smoker or leave your windows open 8 hours of the day, you can get by with 99%.

As long as you're using a HEPA filter, you'll be fine. Keep it in the room where you spend most of your time--for many people that's their bedroom.

lightNlife
08-08-2007, 06:30 PM
There is a difference between an air purifier and an air filter.

<b>Air filters</b>: these trap airborne contaminants such as dust, mold spores, pollen, etc. in a physical way. Think of it like the lint trap in your dryer. When the contaminants are pulled out of the air, they are trapped by the filter.

<b>Air purifiers</b>: these are the type that use an ionization process. What ionizing does is act on the part of the airborne contaminant that causes an unpleasant oder. It works sort of like a magnet. Two metal plates inside the unit will act as a force field upon any particles that get between them. When it "ionizes" these particles, the molecules can actually be pulled apart because of the charge. No longer in their original form, they don't smell. Ionizing units are great for removing musty smells, cigarette smoke, cooking odors, and basically anything else that is airborne and stinky.

When evaluating filters based on which percentage of stuff they remove, you'll see numbers like 99.9% or higher. The obvious answer would be to simply choose the unit with the higher percentage, right? Honestly, you're not going to notice much of a difference between 99 and 99.97 because it's really just a marketing tactic. I'm a little rusty on the specifics, but from what I recall here's how they arrive at those numbers:

Say you've got 1000 particles floating around, and they get sucked into a HEPA filter. The first pass through the filter will remove 99% of those particles. That leaves only 10 particles. Filter again and you remove 99% of those...leaving you with (theoretically) less than 1 particle. See how that works?

Basically, if you're using a <b>HEPA filter</b> in a small, indoor room and one that isn't heavily exposed to airborne pollution, 99% filtration is fine. Unless you're a smoker or leave your windows open 8 hours of the day, you can get by with 99%.

As long as you're using a HEPA filter, you'll be fine. Keep it in the room where you spend most of your time--for many people that's their bedroom.

JennifersHope
08-08-2007, 07:35 PM
<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.kaz.com/kaz/store/product/a69666535caa7e9e50429b52546f2709/
">http://www.kaz.com/kaz/store/p...7e9e50429b52546f2709/
</a>

This is a link to the one I use. My father bought it for me when I was dx with CF. It was recommended to me by the head pulmonogist at Columbia in NYC.

I have had it for 5 years and it is amazing.. My allergies and lung infections have been cut in half by it.

Oddly enough, I have a sinus infection right now, and when I looked at my filter, it was way overdue to be changed... Yikes.

It has two different filters, one is the charcoal filter that goes on the outside of the hepa filter...

The only thing I will say about it is it is noisey, which for me is perfect because I need white noise to sleep.

JennifersHope
08-08-2007, 07:35 PM
<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.kaz.com/kaz/store/product/a69666535caa7e9e50429b52546f2709/
">http://www.kaz.com/kaz/store/p...7e9e50429b52546f2709/
</a>

This is a link to the one I use. My father bought it for me when I was dx with CF. It was recommended to me by the head pulmonogist at Columbia in NYC.

I have had it for 5 years and it is amazing.. My allergies and lung infections have been cut in half by it.

Oddly enough, I have a sinus infection right now, and when I looked at my filter, it was way overdue to be changed... Yikes.

It has two different filters, one is the charcoal filter that goes on the outside of the hepa filter...

The only thing I will say about it is it is noisey, which for me is perfect because I need white noise to sleep.

JennifersHope
08-08-2007, 07:35 PM
<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.kaz.com/kaz/store/product/a69666535caa7e9e50429b52546f2709/
">http://www.kaz.com/kaz/store/p...7e9e50429b52546f2709/
</a>

This is a link to the one I use. My father bought it for me when I was dx with CF. It was recommended to me by the head pulmonogist at Columbia in NYC.

I have had it for 5 years and it is amazing.. My allergies and lung infections have been cut in half by it.

Oddly enough, I have a sinus infection right now, and when I looked at my filter, it was way overdue to be changed... Yikes.

It has two different filters, one is the charcoal filter that goes on the outside of the hepa filter...

The only thing I will say about it is it is noisey, which for me is perfect because I need white noise to sleep.

JennifersHope
08-08-2007, 07:35 PM
<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.kaz.com/kaz/store/product/a69666535caa7e9e50429b52546f2709/
">http://www.kaz.com/kaz/store/p...7e9e50429b52546f2709/
</a>

This is a link to the one I use. My father bought it for me when I was dx with CF. It was recommended to me by the head pulmonogist at Columbia in NYC.

I have had it for 5 years and it is amazing.. My allergies and lung infections have been cut in half by it.

Oddly enough, I have a sinus infection right now, and when I looked at my filter, it was way overdue to be changed... Yikes.

It has two different filters, one is the charcoal filter that goes on the outside of the hepa filter...

The only thing I will say about it is it is noisey, which for me is perfect because I need white noise to sleep.

JennifersHope
08-08-2007, 07:35 PM
<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.kaz.com/kaz/store/product/a69666535caa7e9e50429b52546f2709/
">http://www.kaz.com/kaz/store/p...7e9e50429b52546f2709/
</a>

This is a link to the one I use. My father bought it for me when I was dx with CF. It was recommended to me by the head pulmonogist at Columbia in NYC.

I have had it for 5 years and it is amazing.. My allergies and lung infections have been cut in half by it.

Oddly enough, I have a sinus infection right now, and when I looked at my filter, it was way overdue to be changed... Yikes.

It has two different filters, one is the charcoal filter that goes on the outside of the hepa filter...

The only thing I will say about it is it is noisey, which for me is perfect because I need white noise to sleep.

lightNlife
08-08-2007, 08:11 PM
In case anyone was wondering, the charcoal in Jennifer's air cleaner/filter is a wonderful and safe way to pull stinky odors out of the air as opposed to using an ionizing unit. The charcoal 'sucks' the stinky stuff and bacteria out of the air much like a box of baking soda would do in your fridge. I used to keep a charcoal brick (you can get them at any home improvement store) and kept it under the seat of my car. I was commuting a lot at the time and got sick of rolling the windows down every time I farted in the car! The charcoal brick saved my stinky derrière. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0">

lightNlife
08-08-2007, 08:11 PM
In case anyone was wondering, the charcoal in Jennifer's air cleaner/filter is a wonderful and safe way to pull stinky odors out of the air as opposed to using an ionizing unit. The charcoal 'sucks' the stinky stuff and bacteria out of the air much like a box of baking soda would do in your fridge. I used to keep a charcoal brick (you can get them at any home improvement store) and kept it under the seat of my car. I was commuting a lot at the time and got sick of rolling the windows down every time I farted in the car! The charcoal brick saved my stinky derrière. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0">

lightNlife
08-08-2007, 08:11 PM
In case anyone was wondering, the charcoal in Jennifer's air cleaner/filter is a wonderful and safe way to pull stinky odors out of the air as opposed to using an ionizing unit. The charcoal 'sucks' the stinky stuff and bacteria out of the air much like a box of baking soda would do in your fridge. I used to keep a charcoal brick (you can get them at any home improvement store) and kept it under the seat of my car. I was commuting a lot at the time and got sick of rolling the windows down every time I farted in the car! The charcoal brick saved my stinky derrière. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0">

lightNlife
08-08-2007, 08:11 PM
In case anyone was wondering, the charcoal in Jennifer's air cleaner/filter is a wonderful and safe way to pull stinky odors out of the air as opposed to using an ionizing unit. The charcoal 'sucks' the stinky stuff and bacteria out of the air much like a box of baking soda would do in your fridge. I used to keep a charcoal brick (you can get them at any home improvement store) and kept it under the seat of my car. I was commuting a lot at the time and got sick of rolling the windows down every time I farted in the car! The charcoal brick saved my stinky derrière. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0">

lightNlife
08-08-2007, 08:11 PM
In case anyone was wondering, the charcoal in Jennifer's air cleaner/filter is a wonderful and safe way to pull stinky odors out of the air as opposed to using an ionizing unit. The charcoal 'sucks' the stinky stuff and bacteria out of the air much like a box of baking soda would do in your fridge. I used to keep a charcoal brick (you can get them at any home improvement store) and kept it under the seat of my car. I was commuting a lot at the time and got sick of rolling the windows down every time I farted in the car! The charcoal brick saved my stinky derrière. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0">

paws
08-08-2007, 11:55 PM
"Basically, if you're using a HEPA filter in a small, indoor room and one that isn't heavily exposed to airborne pollution, 99% filtration is fine. Unless you're a smoker or leave your windows open 8 hours of the day, you can get by with 99%."

LightNlife: So sorry for all the questions, but I have a couple more....

I have a pet that sleeps indoors and I just found out that I'm allergic to dog dander. I'd like a unit that can make enough of a difference to alleviate some of my symptoms (the dog is staying put). Do you think that this would qualify for "heavy exposure"?

What differentiates the higher priced air cleaning units from the more affordable ones?

paws
08-08-2007, 11:55 PM
"Basically, if you're using a HEPA filter in a small, indoor room and one that isn't heavily exposed to airborne pollution, 99% filtration is fine. Unless you're a smoker or leave your windows open 8 hours of the day, you can get by with 99%."

LightNlife: So sorry for all the questions, but I have a couple more....

I have a pet that sleeps indoors and I just found out that I'm allergic to dog dander. I'd like a unit that can make enough of a difference to alleviate some of my symptoms (the dog is staying put). Do you think that this would qualify for "heavy exposure"?

What differentiates the higher priced air cleaning units from the more affordable ones?

paws
08-08-2007, 11:55 PM
"Basically, if you're using a HEPA filter in a small, indoor room and one that isn't heavily exposed to airborne pollution, 99% filtration is fine. Unless you're a smoker or leave your windows open 8 hours of the day, you can get by with 99%."

LightNlife: So sorry for all the questions, but I have a couple more....

I have a pet that sleeps indoors and I just found out that I'm allergic to dog dander. I'd like a unit that can make enough of a difference to alleviate some of my symptoms (the dog is staying put). Do you think that this would qualify for "heavy exposure"?

What differentiates the higher priced air cleaning units from the more affordable ones?

paws
08-08-2007, 11:55 PM
"Basically, if you're using a HEPA filter in a small, indoor room and one that isn't heavily exposed to airborne pollution, 99% filtration is fine. Unless you're a smoker or leave your windows open 8 hours of the day, you can get by with 99%."

LightNlife: So sorry for all the questions, but I have a couple more....

I have a pet that sleeps indoors and I just found out that I'm allergic to dog dander. I'd like a unit that can make enough of a difference to alleviate some of my symptoms (the dog is staying put). Do you think that this would qualify for "heavy exposure"?

What differentiates the higher priced air cleaning units from the more affordable ones?

paws
08-08-2007, 11:55 PM
"Basically, if you're using a HEPA filter in a small, indoor room and one that isn't heavily exposed to airborne pollution, 99% filtration is fine. Unless you're a smoker or leave your windows open 8 hours of the day, you can get by with 99%."

LightNlife: So sorry for all the questions, but I have a couple more....

I have a pet that sleeps indoors and I just found out that I'm allergic to dog dander. I'd like a unit that can make enough of a difference to alleviate some of my symptoms (the dog is staying put). Do you think that this would qualify for "heavy exposure"?

What differentiates the higher priced air cleaning units from the more affordable ones?

lightNlife
08-09-2007, 12:16 AM
No problem asking questions, I'm here to help!

The larger, more expensive, (and often louder) units are designed to handle more air at a time. Each unit has a measurement of "cfm" which tells you how many cubic feet or air per minute the thing can pull through the filters. It takes more sophisticated motors and so forth to pull that much air but still not overheat from its power usage. The higher the cfm, the more air you'll clean, but it will be at the cost of higher energy usage as well as added noise.

Some of these large units are great if they're already in a loud setting (such as a dentist's office ) or in an area that is likely to have more junk coming into the air more often. For example, a small shop with a door that opens to the street would want to use a larger unit, because each time that door opens, more things are going to be kicked up into the air.

Avoid buying a larger unit thinking that since it moves more air it will be able to clean up the entire home. There should be one filter to a room. I have one upstairs near my bed which I leave on the lowest setting, since we don't have carpet in there. If I'm going to be grooming my rabbit or playing with him in a carpeted area, I bring the HEPA tower into that room with me. The unit I have downstairs I crank up to full blast when I'm using the stovetop so that airborne gases from our range top can be sucked up easily and quickly.

You mentioned that your pet sleeps indoors. I'm assuming he's outside most of the day where he can pick up dust, pollen, etc. Put the filter near where your dog sleeps, since that's probably where he's going to shake off the majority of his dander and other fun stuff. That way the filter will pick it up before it has a chance to float through the room and land on stuff you frequently contact.

Also, the CFF recommends the Febreeze allergen controlling spray. I have it and and impressed! Here's a little tip to making that fur and dander easier to control on upholstery--Scotch Guard cushions first, then follow up with the Febreeze. Not only will things be easier to pick up with a lint roller, but it won't become as airborne when you do!

I hope that helps.

lightNlife
08-09-2007, 12:16 AM
No problem asking questions, I'm here to help!

The larger, more expensive, (and often louder) units are designed to handle more air at a time. Each unit has a measurement of "cfm" which tells you how many cubic feet or air per minute the thing can pull through the filters. It takes more sophisticated motors and so forth to pull that much air but still not overheat from its power usage. The higher the cfm, the more air you'll clean, but it will be at the cost of higher energy usage as well as added noise.

Some of these large units are great if they're already in a loud setting (such as a dentist's office ) or in an area that is likely to have more junk coming into the air more often. For example, a small shop with a door that opens to the street would want to use a larger unit, because each time that door opens, more things are going to be kicked up into the air.

Avoid buying a larger unit thinking that since it moves more air it will be able to clean up the entire home. There should be one filter to a room. I have one upstairs near my bed which I leave on the lowest setting, since we don't have carpet in there. If I'm going to be grooming my rabbit or playing with him in a carpeted area, I bring the HEPA tower into that room with me. The unit I have downstairs I crank up to full blast when I'm using the stovetop so that airborne gases from our range top can be sucked up easily and quickly.

You mentioned that your pet sleeps indoors. I'm assuming he's outside most of the day where he can pick up dust, pollen, etc. Put the filter near where your dog sleeps, since that's probably where he's going to shake off the majority of his dander and other fun stuff. That way the filter will pick it up before it has a chance to float through the room and land on stuff you frequently contact.

Also, the CFF recommends the Febreeze allergen controlling spray. I have it and and impressed! Here's a little tip to making that fur and dander easier to control on upholstery--Scotch Guard cushions first, then follow up with the Febreeze. Not only will things be easier to pick up with a lint roller, but it won't become as airborne when you do!

I hope that helps.

lightNlife
08-09-2007, 12:16 AM
No problem asking questions, I'm here to help!

The larger, more expensive, (and often louder) units are designed to handle more air at a time. Each unit has a measurement of "cfm" which tells you how many cubic feet or air per minute the thing can pull through the filters. It takes more sophisticated motors and so forth to pull that much air but still not overheat from its power usage. The higher the cfm, the more air you'll clean, but it will be at the cost of higher energy usage as well as added noise.

Some of these large units are great if they're already in a loud setting (such as a dentist's office ) or in an area that is likely to have more junk coming into the air more often. For example, a small shop with a door that opens to the street would want to use a larger unit, because each time that door opens, more things are going to be kicked up into the air.

Avoid buying a larger unit thinking that since it moves more air it will be able to clean up the entire home. There should be one filter to a room. I have one upstairs near my bed which I leave on the lowest setting, since we don't have carpet in there. If I'm going to be grooming my rabbit or playing with him in a carpeted area, I bring the HEPA tower into that room with me. The unit I have downstairs I crank up to full blast when I'm using the stovetop so that airborne gases from our range top can be sucked up easily and quickly.

You mentioned that your pet sleeps indoors. I'm assuming he's outside most of the day where he can pick up dust, pollen, etc. Put the filter near where your dog sleeps, since that's probably where he's going to shake off the majority of his dander and other fun stuff. That way the filter will pick it up before it has a chance to float through the room and land on stuff you frequently contact.

Also, the CFF recommends the Febreeze allergen controlling spray. I have it and and impressed! Here's a little tip to making that fur and dander easier to control on upholstery--Scotch Guard cushions first, then follow up with the Febreeze. Not only will things be easier to pick up with a lint roller, but it won't become as airborne when you do!

I hope that helps.

lightNlife
08-09-2007, 12:16 AM
No problem asking questions, I'm here to help!

The larger, more expensive, (and often louder) units are designed to handle more air at a time. Each unit has a measurement of "cfm" which tells you how many cubic feet or air per minute the thing can pull through the filters. It takes more sophisticated motors and so forth to pull that much air but still not overheat from its power usage. The higher the cfm, the more air you'll clean, but it will be at the cost of higher energy usage as well as added noise.

Some of these large units are great if they're already in a loud setting (such as a dentist's office ) or in an area that is likely to have more junk coming into the air more often. For example, a small shop with a door that opens to the street would want to use a larger unit, because each time that door opens, more things are going to be kicked up into the air.

Avoid buying a larger unit thinking that since it moves more air it will be able to clean up the entire home. There should be one filter to a room. I have one upstairs near my bed which I leave on the lowest setting, since we don't have carpet in there. If I'm going to be grooming my rabbit or playing with him in a carpeted area, I bring the HEPA tower into that room with me. The unit I have downstairs I crank up to full blast when I'm using the stovetop so that airborne gases from our range top can be sucked up easily and quickly.

You mentioned that your pet sleeps indoors. I'm assuming he's outside most of the day where he can pick up dust, pollen, etc. Put the filter near where your dog sleeps, since that's probably where he's going to shake off the majority of his dander and other fun stuff. That way the filter will pick it up before it has a chance to float through the room and land on stuff you frequently contact.

Also, the CFF recommends the Febreeze allergen controlling spray. I have it and and impressed! Here's a little tip to making that fur and dander easier to control on upholstery--Scotch Guard cushions first, then follow up with the Febreeze. Not only will things be easier to pick up with a lint roller, but it won't become as airborne when you do!

I hope that helps.

lightNlife
08-09-2007, 12:16 AM
No problem asking questions, I'm here to help!

The larger, more expensive, (and often louder) units are designed to handle more air at a time. Each unit has a measurement of "cfm" which tells you how many cubic feet or air per minute the thing can pull through the filters. It takes more sophisticated motors and so forth to pull that much air but still not overheat from its power usage. The higher the cfm, the more air you'll clean, but it will be at the cost of higher energy usage as well as added noise.

Some of these large units are great if they're already in a loud setting (such as a dentist's office ) or in an area that is likely to have more junk coming into the air more often. For example, a small shop with a door that opens to the street would want to use a larger unit, because each time that door opens, more things are going to be kicked up into the air.

Avoid buying a larger unit thinking that since it moves more air it will be able to clean up the entire home. There should be one filter to a room. I have one upstairs near my bed which I leave on the lowest setting, since we don't have carpet in there. If I'm going to be grooming my rabbit or playing with him in a carpeted area, I bring the HEPA tower into that room with me. The unit I have downstairs I crank up to full blast when I'm using the stovetop so that airborne gases from our range top can be sucked up easily and quickly.

You mentioned that your pet sleeps indoors. I'm assuming he's outside most of the day where he can pick up dust, pollen, etc. Put the filter near where your dog sleeps, since that's probably where he's going to shake off the majority of his dander and other fun stuff. That way the filter will pick it up before it has a chance to float through the room and land on stuff you frequently contact.

Also, the CFF recommends the Febreeze allergen controlling spray. I have it and and impressed! Here's a little tip to making that fur and dander easier to control on upholstery--Scotch Guard cushions first, then follow up with the Febreeze. Not only will things be easier to pick up with a lint roller, but it won't become as airborne when you do!

I hope that helps.

wallflower
08-09-2007, 07:19 PM
I have a Homes air purifier from Target that I like. It has both the HEPA and charcoal filters. The noise level is similar to having a fan on. With your small workspace, you can get away with a small unit for under $100.

wallflower
08-09-2007, 07:19 PM
I have a Homes air purifier from Target that I like. It has both the HEPA and charcoal filters. The noise level is similar to having a fan on. With your small workspace, you can get away with a small unit for under $100.

wallflower
08-09-2007, 07:19 PM
I have a Homes air purifier from Target that I like. It has both the HEPA and charcoal filters. The noise level is similar to having a fan on. With your small workspace, you can get away with a small unit for under $100.

wallflower
08-09-2007, 07:19 PM
I have a Homes air purifier from Target that I like. It has both the HEPA and charcoal filters. The noise level is similar to having a fan on. With your small workspace, you can get away with a small unit for under $100.

wallflower
08-09-2007, 07:19 PM
I have a Homes air purifier from Target that I like. It has both the HEPA and charcoal filters. The noise level is similar to having a fan on. With your small workspace, you can get away with a small unit for under $100.

sunflower
08-11-2007, 07:08 AM
I haven't got an air purifier yet and I am very interested in getting one.
I wanted to do my research first and Ihave got great tips from you guys. Just to clarify do you leave it on while you sleep? Do you leave it on all?.

sunflower
--------------
dx's 33 yrs old
ABPA, Bronchesitis
would like to have a baby this year!!!
DF508 P67L

sunflower
08-11-2007, 07:08 AM
I haven't got an air purifier yet and I am very interested in getting one.
I wanted to do my research first and Ihave got great tips from you guys. Just to clarify do you leave it on while you sleep? Do you leave it on all?.

sunflower
--------------
dx's 33 yrs old
ABPA, Bronchesitis
would like to have a baby this year!!!
DF508 P67L

sunflower
08-11-2007, 07:08 AM
I haven't got an air purifier yet and I am very interested in getting one.
I wanted to do my research first and Ihave got great tips from you guys. Just to clarify do you leave it on while you sleep? Do you leave it on all?.

sunflower
--------------
dx's 33 yrs old
ABPA, Bronchesitis
would like to have a baby this year!!!
DF508 P67L

sunflower
08-11-2007, 07:08 AM
I haven't got an air purifier yet and I am very interested in getting one.
I wanted to do my research first and Ihave got great tips from you guys. Just to clarify do you leave it on while you sleep? Do you leave it on all?.

sunflower
--------------
dx's 33 yrs old
ABPA, Bronchesitis
would like to have a baby this year!!!
DF508 P67L

sunflower
08-11-2007, 07:08 AM
I haven't got an air purifier yet and I am very interested in getting one.
I wanted to do my research first and Ihave got great tips from you guys. Just to clarify do you leave it on while you sleep? Do you leave it on all?.

sunflower
--------------
dx's 33 yrs old
ABPA, Bronchesitis
would like to have a baby this year!!!
DF508 P67L

Momtana
08-12-2007, 01:15 AM
another county heard from - AUSTIN AIR filters were prescribed by the doctor I saw for chemical sensitivity, which was before I learned I had CF.
We have four in the house and I have one at work.

Momtana
08-12-2007, 01:15 AM
another county heard from - AUSTIN AIR filters were prescribed by the doctor I saw for chemical sensitivity, which was before I learned I had CF.
We have four in the house and I have one at work.

Momtana
08-12-2007, 01:15 AM
another county heard from - AUSTIN AIR filters were prescribed by the doctor I saw for chemical sensitivity, which was before I learned I had CF.
We have four in the house and I have one at work.

Momtana
08-12-2007, 01:15 AM
another county heard from - AUSTIN AIR filters were prescribed by the doctor I saw for chemical sensitivity, which was before I learned I had CF.
We have four in the house and I have one at work.

Momtana
08-12-2007, 01:15 AM
another county heard from - AUSTIN AIR filters were prescribed by the doctor I saw for chemical sensitivity, which was before I learned I had CF.
We have four in the house and I have one at work.

Momtana
08-12-2007, 01:18 AM
however ........ I'd really like to build a green home that had a whole house air filter AND water filter. It will also have radiant heating. The home I grew up in had radiant heating and I loved lying around on the floor, especially in the morning when I was a little little kid.

Momtana
08-12-2007, 01:18 AM
however ........ I'd really like to build a green home that had a whole house air filter AND water filter. It will also have radiant heating. The home I grew up in had radiant heating and I loved lying around on the floor, especially in the morning when I was a little little kid.

Momtana
08-12-2007, 01:18 AM
however ........ I'd really like to build a green home that had a whole house air filter AND water filter. It will also have radiant heating. The home I grew up in had radiant heating and I loved lying around on the floor, especially in the morning when I was a little little kid.

Momtana
08-12-2007, 01:18 AM
however ........ I'd really like to build a green home that had a whole house air filter AND water filter. It will also have radiant heating. The home I grew up in had radiant heating and I loved lying around on the floor, especially in the morning when I was a little little kid.

Momtana
08-12-2007, 01:18 AM
however ........ I'd really like to build a green home that had a whole house air filter AND water filter. It will also have radiant heating. The home I grew up in had radiant heating and I loved lying around on the floor, especially in the morning when I was a little little kid.

paws
08-12-2007, 02:04 AM
Momtana,

Which model Austin do you have?

paws
08-12-2007, 02:04 AM
Momtana,

Which model Austin do you have?

paws
08-12-2007, 02:04 AM
Momtana,

Which model Austin do you have?

paws
08-12-2007, 02:04 AM
Momtana,

Which model Austin do you have?

paws
08-12-2007, 02:04 AM
Momtana,

Which model Austin do you have?

peppercrane
02-23-2011, 04:32 AM
Talk about living in a polluted world. Apart from [L=office air purifiers]http://www.virnalashomerepair.com[/L, our reception area has a jar of hand sanitizer also.

peppercrane
02-23-2011, 04:32 AM
Talk about living in a polluted world. Apart from [L=office air purifiers]http://www.virnalashomerepair.com[/L, our reception area has a jar of hand sanitizer also.

peppercrane
02-23-2011, 04:32 AM
Talk about living in a polluted world. Apart from [L=office air purifiers]http://www.virnalashomerepair.com[/L, our reception area has a jar of hand sanitizer also.

airglecorp
11-25-2011, 10:52 AM
<br>Yes, you should get a HEPA air purifier that doesn't generate ozone. To compare different brands, look for CADR seal on the air purifier packing. Higher CADR number, the better machine is. Airgle air purifier has the highest CADR, certified by AHAM

airglecorp
11-25-2011, 10:52 AM
<br>Yes, you should get a HEPA air purifier that doesn't generate ozone. To compare different brands, look for CADR seal on the air purifier packing. Higher CADR number, the better machine is. Airgle air purifier has the highest CADR, certified by AHAM

airglecorp
11-25-2011, 10:52 AM
<br>Yes, you should get a HEPA air purifier that doesn't generate ozone. To compare different brands, look for CADR seal on the air purifier packing. Higher CADR number, the better machine is. Airgle air purifier has the highest CADR, certified by AHAM

mamerth
11-25-2011, 11:26 PM
We just got a REME. It clears the air as the furnace works (it is hooked up to the furnace). It cleans the air with hydrogen proxide. We have only had it installed for a few days and my sinuses feel TONS BETTER. My sinuses are moist and not even a touch plugged. I haven't noticed a major change in my lungs yet. I did sleep all night last night with a little bit less coughing. It supposedly cleans pseudomonas, mold and strep out of the air and off of surfaces in the home.
<br>
<br>I am curious to see if it will affect my lung function. We have a doctor friend who installed once his his home and his kids hardly ever get sick.<br>
<br>
<a href="http://www.rgf.com/documents/spec_sheets/REMEbrochure.pdf" title="" target="_blank">javascript:nicTemp();</a>-- click here to see the product<br>

mamerth
11-25-2011, 11:26 PM
We just got a REME. It clears the air as the furnace works (it is hooked up to the furnace). It cleans the air with hydrogen proxide. We have only had it installed for a few days and my sinuses feel TONS BETTER. My sinuses are moist and not even a touch plugged. I haven't noticed a major change in my lungs yet. I did sleep all night last night with a little bit less coughing. It supposedly cleans pseudomonas, mold and strep out of the air and off of surfaces in the home.
<br>
<br>I am curious to see if it will affect my lung function. We have a doctor friend who installed once his his home and his kids hardly ever get sick.<br>
<br>
<a href="http://www.rgf.com/documents/spec_sheets/REMEbrochure.pdf" title="" target="_blank">javascript:nicTemp();</a>-- click here to see the product<br>

mamerth
11-25-2011, 11:26 PM
We just got a REME. It clears the air as the furnace works (it is hooked up to the furnace). It cleans the air with hydrogen proxide. We have only had it installed for a few days and my sinuses feel TONS BETTER. My sinuses are moist and not even a touch plugged. I haven't noticed a major change in my lungs yet. I did sleep all night last night with a little bit less coughing. It supposedly cleans pseudomonas, mold and strep out of the air and off of surfaces in the home.
<br>
<br>I am curious to see if it will affect my lung function. We have a doctor friend who installed once his his home and his kids hardly ever get sick.<br>
<br>
<a href="http://www.rgf.com/documents/spec_sheets/REMEbrochure.pdf" title="" target="_blank">javascript:nicTemp();</a>-- click here to see the product<br>