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kayleesgrandma
06-03-2007, 05:17 AM
In another promising early study, researchers at the Mayo Clinic found that the herb ginseng may help alleviate fatigue in cancer patients.

Close to 300 patients were randomized to receive 750 milligrams, 1,000 milligrams or 2,000 milligrams of ginseng a day or a placebo. Participants had different types of cancer and were either in treatment or had completed treatment and had a life expectancy of at least six months. All had a history of fatigue. The herb used in the study was Wisconsin ginseng.

About a quarter of patients in the 1,000-milligram and 2,000-milligram groups reported "moderately better" or "much better" fatigue levels compared with just 10 percent in both the 750-milligram and placebo groups, the researchers found.

"We believe that Wisconsin ginseng deserves to be studied in a larger trial, and we are planning to do so in our research group," said researcher Debra L. Barton, an associate professor of oncology at Mayo Clinic.

<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.healthday.com/
">http://www.healthday.com/
</a>

kayleesgrandma
06-03-2007, 05:17 AM
In another promising early study, researchers at the Mayo Clinic found that the herb ginseng may help alleviate fatigue in cancer patients.

Close to 300 patients were randomized to receive 750 milligrams, 1,000 milligrams or 2,000 milligrams of ginseng a day or a placebo. Participants had different types of cancer and were either in treatment or had completed treatment and had a life expectancy of at least six months. All had a history of fatigue. The herb used in the study was Wisconsin ginseng.

About a quarter of patients in the 1,000-milligram and 2,000-milligram groups reported "moderately better" or "much better" fatigue levels compared with just 10 percent in both the 750-milligram and placebo groups, the researchers found.

"We believe that Wisconsin ginseng deserves to be studied in a larger trial, and we are planning to do so in our research group," said researcher Debra L. Barton, an associate professor of oncology at Mayo Clinic.

<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.healthday.com/
">http://www.healthday.com/
</a>

kayleesgrandma
06-03-2007, 05:17 AM
In another promising early study, researchers at the Mayo Clinic found that the herb ginseng may help alleviate fatigue in cancer patients.

Close to 300 patients were randomized to receive 750 milligrams, 1,000 milligrams or 2,000 milligrams of ginseng a day or a placebo. Participants had different types of cancer and were either in treatment or had completed treatment and had a life expectancy of at least six months. All had a history of fatigue. The herb used in the study was Wisconsin ginseng.

About a quarter of patients in the 1,000-milligram and 2,000-milligram groups reported "moderately better" or "much better" fatigue levels compared with just 10 percent in both the 750-milligram and placebo groups, the researchers found.

"We believe that Wisconsin ginseng deserves to be studied in a larger trial, and we are planning to do so in our research group," said researcher Debra L. Barton, an associate professor of oncology at Mayo Clinic.

<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.healthday.com/
">http://www.healthday.com/
</a>

kayleesgrandma
06-03-2007, 05:17 AM
In another promising early study, researchers at the Mayo Clinic found that the herb ginseng may help alleviate fatigue in cancer patients.

Close to 300 patients were randomized to receive 750 milligrams, 1,000 milligrams or 2,000 milligrams of ginseng a day or a placebo. Participants had different types of cancer and were either in treatment or had completed treatment and had a life expectancy of at least six months. All had a history of fatigue. The herb used in the study was Wisconsin ginseng.

About a quarter of patients in the 1,000-milligram and 2,000-milligram groups reported "moderately better" or "much better" fatigue levels compared with just 10 percent in both the 750-milligram and placebo groups, the researchers found.

"We believe that Wisconsin ginseng deserves to be studied in a larger trial, and we are planning to do so in our research group," said researcher Debra L. Barton, an associate professor of oncology at Mayo Clinic.

<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.healthday.com/
">http://www.healthday.com/
</a>

kayleesgrandma
06-03-2007, 05:17 AM
In another promising early study, researchers at the Mayo Clinic found that the herb ginseng may help alleviate fatigue in cancer patients.

Close to 300 patients were randomized to receive 750 milligrams, 1,000 milligrams or 2,000 milligrams of ginseng a day or a placebo. Participants had different types of cancer and were either in treatment or had completed treatment and had a life expectancy of at least six months. All had a history of fatigue. The herb used in the study was Wisconsin ginseng.

About a quarter of patients in the 1,000-milligram and 2,000-milligram groups reported "moderately better" or "much better" fatigue levels compared with just 10 percent in both the 750-milligram and placebo groups, the researchers found.

"We believe that Wisconsin ginseng deserves to be studied in a larger trial, and we are planning to do so in our research group," said researcher Debra L. Barton, an associate professor of oncology at Mayo Clinic.

<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.healthday.com/
">http://www.healthday.com/
</a>

kayleesgrandma
06-03-2007, 05:17 AM
In another promising early study, researchers at the Mayo Clinic found that the herb ginseng may help alleviate fatigue in cancer patients.

Close to 300 patients were randomized to receive 750 milligrams, 1,000 milligrams or 2,000 milligrams of ginseng a day or a placebo. Participants had different types of cancer and were either in treatment or had completed treatment and had a life expectancy of at least six months. All had a history of fatigue. The herb used in the study was Wisconsin ginseng.

About a quarter of patients in the 1,000-milligram and 2,000-milligram groups reported "moderately better" or "much better" fatigue levels compared with just 10 percent in both the 750-milligram and placebo groups, the researchers found.

"We believe that Wisconsin ginseng deserves to be studied in a larger trial, and we are planning to do so in our research group," said researcher Debra L. Barton, an associate professor of oncology at Mayo Clinic.

<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.healthday.com/
">http://www.healthday.com/
</a>