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View Full Version : Albuterol ?'s



Jade
05-28-2007, 08:55 PM
I've been on nebulized albuterol for about 8 years. Lately it seems to be far less effective than in the past. When I was last hospitalized they gave me Duoneb instead of albuterol. It seemed to work a little better but I was so screwed up I couldn't say for sure. I would like to try something different at this point.
<i>Has anyone switched from plain albuterol to duoneb?
Did you notice a difference?
Can a person build some type of tolerance to inhaled meds over the years?</i>

Jade
05-28-2007, 08:55 PM
I've been on nebulized albuterol for about 8 years. Lately it seems to be far less effective than in the past. When I was last hospitalized they gave me Duoneb instead of albuterol. It seemed to work a little better but I was so screwed up I couldn't say for sure. I would like to try something different at this point.
<i>Has anyone switched from plain albuterol to duoneb?
Did you notice a difference?
Can a person build some type of tolerance to inhaled meds over the years?</i>

Jade
05-28-2007, 08:55 PM
I've been on nebulized albuterol for about 8 years. Lately it seems to be far less effective than in the past. When I was last hospitalized they gave me Duoneb instead of albuterol. It seemed to work a little better but I was so screwed up I couldn't say for sure. I would like to try something different at this point.
<i>Has anyone switched from plain albuterol to duoneb?
Did you notice a difference?
Can a person build some type of tolerance to inhaled meds over the years?</i>

JennifersHope
05-28-2007, 09:10 PM
Hi

Duoneb is a wonderful product.. I use that on a regular basis but it is albuterol it just has atrovant mixed in with it.. That is why they call it duo...(two) nebs..

Maybe you liked it better because it had the atrovant in it.. I am not sure...

You can definitly build up a tolerance to Albuterol though...

Jennifer

JennifersHope
05-28-2007, 09:10 PM
Hi

Duoneb is a wonderful product.. I use that on a regular basis but it is albuterol it just has atrovant mixed in with it.. That is why they call it duo...(two) nebs..

Maybe you liked it better because it had the atrovant in it.. I am not sure...

You can definitly build up a tolerance to Albuterol though...

Jennifer

JennifersHope
05-28-2007, 09:10 PM
Hi

Duoneb is a wonderful product.. I use that on a regular basis but it is albuterol it just has atrovant mixed in with it.. That is why they call it duo...(two) nebs..

Maybe you liked it better because it had the atrovant in it.. I am not sure...

You can definitly build up a tolerance to Albuterol though...

Jennifer

kswitch
05-28-2007, 09:18 PM
i'm no doc, but i do know that tolerance is a mental state. when we first start using a drug, the effects can be profound. as this profoundness wears off, they can feel less effective as the brain compensates for the altered state. the tolerance effect is most notable with mood altering substances like alcohol, zoloft, etc and narcotic-like drugs opiates, acetominophen, etc. you might recall albuterol having a "speedy" effect when you first started with it and when you do more than your usual dose that wore off after a few weeks. this is tolerance.

if you feel like it is less effective after such a long period of time, i would assume that something is different with you. like maybe there is something that is decreasing your baseline. maybe you are having more inflamation from new allergens. you said in an earlier entry that you thought a bug was trying to take hold, maybe something has.

i also just wanted to ask who put you on duoneb? i was on combivent (which appears to be the same thing) while seeing a pulmo at the county hosp, but my cf doc took me off of it immediately and put me on just albuterol. he said that atrovent (iprotropium bromide) tended to dry out secretions, thereby exacerbating the underlying problem with cf lungs. when i switched, i did notice that the albuterol didn't bronchodialate as well as the combivent, but after a few days, crap was MUCH easier to cough up, and my coughs wre significantly more productive. as a result, my baseline increased. so the alb wasn't as effective, but i was noticeably less dependent.

once again, i'm no doc, but that has been my experience. but you might consider inquiring about that, just to see what they say. i'd be curious to know what they tellyou.

kswitch
05-28-2007, 09:18 PM
i'm no doc, but i do know that tolerance is a mental state. when we first start using a drug, the effects can be profound. as this profoundness wears off, they can feel less effective as the brain compensates for the altered state. the tolerance effect is most notable with mood altering substances like alcohol, zoloft, etc and narcotic-like drugs opiates, acetominophen, etc. you might recall albuterol having a "speedy" effect when you first started with it and when you do more than your usual dose that wore off after a few weeks. this is tolerance.

if you feel like it is less effective after such a long period of time, i would assume that something is different with you. like maybe there is something that is decreasing your baseline. maybe you are having more inflamation from new allergens. you said in an earlier entry that you thought a bug was trying to take hold, maybe something has.

i also just wanted to ask who put you on duoneb? i was on combivent (which appears to be the same thing) while seeing a pulmo at the county hosp, but my cf doc took me off of it immediately and put me on just albuterol. he said that atrovent (iprotropium bromide) tended to dry out secretions, thereby exacerbating the underlying problem with cf lungs. when i switched, i did notice that the albuterol didn't bronchodialate as well as the combivent, but after a few days, crap was MUCH easier to cough up, and my coughs wre significantly more productive. as a result, my baseline increased. so the alb wasn't as effective, but i was noticeably less dependent.

once again, i'm no doc, but that has been my experience. but you might consider inquiring about that, just to see what they say. i'd be curious to know what they tellyou.

kswitch
05-28-2007, 09:18 PM
i'm no doc, but i do know that tolerance is a mental state. when we first start using a drug, the effects can be profound. as this profoundness wears off, they can feel less effective as the brain compensates for the altered state. the tolerance effect is most notable with mood altering substances like alcohol, zoloft, etc and narcotic-like drugs opiates, acetominophen, etc. you might recall albuterol having a "speedy" effect when you first started with it and when you do more than your usual dose that wore off after a few weeks. this is tolerance.

if you feel like it is less effective after such a long period of time, i would assume that something is different with you. like maybe there is something that is decreasing your baseline. maybe you are having more inflamation from new allergens. you said in an earlier entry that you thought a bug was trying to take hold, maybe something has.

i also just wanted to ask who put you on duoneb? i was on combivent (which appears to be the same thing) while seeing a pulmo at the county hosp, but my cf doc took me off of it immediately and put me on just albuterol. he said that atrovent (iprotropium bromide) tended to dry out secretions, thereby exacerbating the underlying problem with cf lungs. when i switched, i did notice that the albuterol didn't bronchodialate as well as the combivent, but after a few days, crap was MUCH easier to cough up, and my coughs wre significantly more productive. as a result, my baseline increased. so the alb wasn't as effective, but i was noticeably less dependent.

once again, i'm no doc, but that has been my experience. but you might consider inquiring about that, just to see what they say. i'd be curious to know what they tellyou.

NoExcuses
05-28-2007, 10:20 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>kswitch</b></i>

i'm no doc, but i do know that tolerance is a mental state.

</end quote></div>

That is far from the truth, to put it lightly.

Tolerance is not mental, it's physical. There are physiological changes that occure in the body when a tolerance is built up to a medical.


<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote> when we first start using a drug, the effects can be profound. as this profoundness wears off, they can feel less effective as the brain compensates for the altered state. </end quote></div>


not sure where you got that from, but again, this is flat out false.

NoExcuses
05-28-2007, 10:20 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>kswitch</b></i>

i'm no doc, but i do know that tolerance is a mental state.

</end quote></div>

That is far from the truth, to put it lightly.

Tolerance is not mental, it's physical. There are physiological changes that occure in the body when a tolerance is built up to a medical.


<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote> when we first start using a drug, the effects can be profound. as this profoundness wears off, they can feel less effective as the brain compensates for the altered state. </end quote></div>


not sure where you got that from, but again, this is flat out false.

NoExcuses
05-28-2007, 10:20 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>kswitch</b></i>

i'm no doc, but i do know that tolerance is a mental state.

</end quote></div>

That is far from the truth, to put it lightly.

Tolerance is not mental, it's physical. There are physiological changes that occure in the body when a tolerance is built up to a medical.


<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote> when we first start using a drug, the effects can be profound. as this profoundness wears off, they can feel less effective as the brain compensates for the altered state. </end quote></div>


not sure where you got that from, but again, this is flat out false.

lightNlife
05-28-2007, 10:30 PM
I have recently switched from Xopenex in the neb, to Xopenex HFA. I'm doing very well with it. It keeps me opened up better than the other. I've also noticed that paired with regular vest treatments, and my other nebs, I'm feeling better these days.

lightNlife
05-28-2007, 10:30 PM
I have recently switched from Xopenex in the neb, to Xopenex HFA. I'm doing very well with it. It keeps me opened up better than the other. I've also noticed that paired with regular vest treatments, and my other nebs, I'm feeling better these days.

lightNlife
05-28-2007, 10:30 PM
I have recently switched from Xopenex in the neb, to Xopenex HFA. I'm doing very well with it. It keeps me opened up better than the other. I've also noticed that paired with regular vest treatments, and my other nebs, I'm feeling better these days.

AnD
05-29-2007, 01:50 AM
Hmm. My allergist had said something to me the last time I was there about the Xopenex inhaler. Maybe I should give it a try. Anything (with the same result) that would shorten the time I spend in this chair with this thing in my teeth...LOL <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-wink.gif" border="0">

AnD
05-29-2007, 01:50 AM
Hmm. My allergist had said something to me the last time I was there about the Xopenex inhaler. Maybe I should give it a try. Anything (with the same result) that would shorten the time I spend in this chair with this thing in my teeth...LOL <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-wink.gif" border="0">

AnD
05-29-2007, 01:50 AM
Hmm. My allergist had said something to me the last time I was there about the Xopenex inhaler. Maybe I should give it a try. Anything (with the same result) that would shorten the time I spend in this chair with this thing in my teeth...LOL <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-wink.gif" border="0">

kswitch
05-29-2007, 02:31 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>sakasuka</b></i>

<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>kswitch</b></i>



i'm no doc, but i do know that tolerance is a mental state.



</end quote></div>



That is far from the truth, to put it lightly.



Tolerance is not mental, it's physical. There are physiological changes that occure in the body when a tolerance is built up to a medical.





<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote> when we first start using a drug, the effects can be profound. as this profoundness wears off, they can feel less effective as the brain compensates for the altered state. </end quote></div>





not sure where you got that from, but again, this is flat out false.</end quote></div>


i get that from my experience, and readings into addiction. what kind of physiological changes might be occuring that make a drug less effective? chemical reactions don't build a tolerance and happen less efficiently without physical or chemical change. i don't dispute that it's possible, but what i question is whether the effect is due to the properties of the drug itself, or some other environmental factor.

if i am wrong, please enlighten me with an informative response rather than an antagonistic one. you're not helping me understand a lick, but i hope you feel better. is my medical knowledge not academic enough to partake of your infinite wisdom? or is your knowledge as opinionated and experientially obtained as mine is?

kswitch
05-29-2007, 02:31 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>sakasuka</b></i>

<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>kswitch</b></i>



i'm no doc, but i do know that tolerance is a mental state.



</end quote></div>



That is far from the truth, to put it lightly.



Tolerance is not mental, it's physical. There are physiological changes that occure in the body when a tolerance is built up to a medical.





<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote> when we first start using a drug, the effects can be profound. as this profoundness wears off, they can feel less effective as the brain compensates for the altered state. </end quote></div>





not sure where you got that from, but again, this is flat out false.</end quote></div>


i get that from my experience, and readings into addiction. what kind of physiological changes might be occuring that make a drug less effective? chemical reactions don't build a tolerance and happen less efficiently without physical or chemical change. i don't dispute that it's possible, but what i question is whether the effect is due to the properties of the drug itself, or some other environmental factor.

if i am wrong, please enlighten me with an informative response rather than an antagonistic one. you're not helping me understand a lick, but i hope you feel better. is my medical knowledge not academic enough to partake of your infinite wisdom? or is your knowledge as opinionated and experientially obtained as mine is?

kswitch
05-29-2007, 02:31 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>sakasuka</b></i>

<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>kswitch</b></i>



i'm no doc, but i do know that tolerance is a mental state.



</end quote></div>



That is far from the truth, to put it lightly.



Tolerance is not mental, it's physical. There are physiological changes that occure in the body when a tolerance is built up to a medical.





<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote> when we first start using a drug, the effects can be profound. as this profoundness wears off, they can feel less effective as the brain compensates for the altered state. </end quote></div>





not sure where you got that from, but again, this is flat out false.</end quote></div>


i get that from my experience, and readings into addiction. what kind of physiological changes might be occuring that make a drug less effective? chemical reactions don't build a tolerance and happen less efficiently without physical or chemical change. i don't dispute that it's possible, but what i question is whether the effect is due to the properties of the drug itself, or some other environmental factor.

if i am wrong, please enlighten me with an informative response rather than an antagonistic one. you're not helping me understand a lick, but i hope you feel better. is my medical knowledge not academic enough to partake of your infinite wisdom? or is your knowledge as opinionated and experientially obtained as mine is?

ladybug
05-29-2007, 04:31 AM
I am on albuterol in the AM and duoneb in the evening. I used to use albuterol at night and mix it myself with atrovent which was crazy since there is a product for this! LOL...

I too heard that atrovent can dry secretions when I stitched to this new CF doc (my prior CF doc put me on it in another state)... But, she said I can feel free to stay on it if I want. I don't really see any difference personally, so I stayed on it cause I'm afraid of change. LOL

Anyway, I don't know how tolerance would work with CF drugs. I suppose maybe something like "resistance", which happens with overusing particular antibiotics, but as far as things that aim to open the airways, and have nothing to do with your infections directly, I don't know if your lungs would "get used to" something that has just one thing to do ... to open you up. I don't really see how that could happen with something like albuterol. I can see how you'd get sicker or have bad days when you didn't feel it helped you as much so need it more often, but that's all I've heard of.

I do know tolerance IS a real thing with regards to some psychological drugs, etc. where you'd need more of the med to get the same benefit the longer you use it, but it only happens with some drugs and I don't think things like bronchodialators fall into that category. I don't think we really have to worry about it much with things like inhaled meds. I think if you need something more or aren't feeling its effects, maybe your lungs just aren't where they were before and need more of the med to really open you up. I don't know...

Sorry for the long-winded answer. Its late. LOL

ladybug
05-29-2007, 04:31 AM
I am on albuterol in the AM and duoneb in the evening. I used to use albuterol at night and mix it myself with atrovent which was crazy since there is a product for this! LOL...

I too heard that atrovent can dry secretions when I stitched to this new CF doc (my prior CF doc put me on it in another state)... But, she said I can feel free to stay on it if I want. I don't really see any difference personally, so I stayed on it cause I'm afraid of change. LOL

Anyway, I don't know how tolerance would work with CF drugs. I suppose maybe something like "resistance", which happens with overusing particular antibiotics, but as far as things that aim to open the airways, and have nothing to do with your infections directly, I don't know if your lungs would "get used to" something that has just one thing to do ... to open you up. I don't really see how that could happen with something like albuterol. I can see how you'd get sicker or have bad days when you didn't feel it helped you as much so need it more often, but that's all I've heard of.

I do know tolerance IS a real thing with regards to some psychological drugs, etc. where you'd need more of the med to get the same benefit the longer you use it, but it only happens with some drugs and I don't think things like bronchodialators fall into that category. I don't think we really have to worry about it much with things like inhaled meds. I think if you need something more or aren't feeling its effects, maybe your lungs just aren't where they were before and need more of the med to really open you up. I don't know...

Sorry for the long-winded answer. Its late. LOL

ladybug
05-29-2007, 04:31 AM
I am on albuterol in the AM and duoneb in the evening. I used to use albuterol at night and mix it myself with atrovent which was crazy since there is a product for this! LOL...

I too heard that atrovent can dry secretions when I stitched to this new CF doc (my prior CF doc put me on it in another state)... But, she said I can feel free to stay on it if I want. I don't really see any difference personally, so I stayed on it cause I'm afraid of change. LOL

Anyway, I don't know how tolerance would work with CF drugs. I suppose maybe something like "resistance", which happens with overusing particular antibiotics, but as far as things that aim to open the airways, and have nothing to do with your infections directly, I don't know if your lungs would "get used to" something that has just one thing to do ... to open you up. I don't really see how that could happen with something like albuterol. I can see how you'd get sicker or have bad days when you didn't feel it helped you as much so need it more often, but that's all I've heard of.

I do know tolerance IS a real thing with regards to some psychological drugs, etc. where you'd need more of the med to get the same benefit the longer you use it, but it only happens with some drugs and I don't think things like bronchodialators fall into that category. I don't think we really have to worry about it much with things like inhaled meds. I think if you need something more or aren't feeling its effects, maybe your lungs just aren't where they were before and need more of the med to really open you up. I don't know...

Sorry for the long-winded answer. Its late. LOL