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Ender
12-05-2006, 09:18 PM
Shortcut to: <a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.timesonl">http://www.timesonl</a> ine.co.uk/ article/0, ,2087-2484028, 00.html

The Sunday Times December 03, 2006

DNA spray offers cystic fibrosis hope
Jonathan Leake



British researchers are to trial a new gene therapy for cystic fibrosis in
which sufferers simply inhale a spray laden with DNA.
The announcement comes just days after Gordon Brown, the chancellor, and his
wife Sarah announced that their four-month-old son Fraser had been diagnosed
with the inherited condition.

If it works, the 20m programme could lead to a treatment that will improve
and extend the lives of thousands of cystic fibrosis sufferers around the
world.

"I'm optimistic. We've harnessed the best scientific talent in the UK and
they're very focused," said Rosie Barnes, chief executive of the Cystic
Fibrosis Trust, the charity that is funding most of the cost of the trial.
"If anybody's able to do it, they are."

The disease is caused by a defective gene that causes the lungs and airways
to fill with sticky mucus, which acts as a breeding ground for bacteria.

About one in 25 people unwittingly carry a copy of the defective gene. but
it proves harmful only if a child is unlucky enough to inherit two copies,
one from each parent.

About 10,000 people in Britain have cystic fibrosis. Most can expect to live
no more than 31 years and much of their life will be spent struggling to
control the symptoms, which can include liver failure and diabetes.

Researchers emphasise that such trials must be treated and publicised with
caution for fear of raising false hopes among sufferers. It will also take
at least three years for the early results to emerge.

However, the large-scale medical trials follow studies in animals and
smaller trials in humans that have already hinted at powerful benefits.

Professor Eric Alton, a specialist in gene therapy at the Brompton hospital
and Imperial College London, who is leading the study, said it would involve
200 patients at the Brompton in London and at the Western general hospital
in Edinburgh.

Half of these would be given the genuine therapy and half a "dummy"
treatment. Then their conditions would be compared to see if the therapy had
made a significant difference.

If the results are promising, the scientists expect to team up with one or
more private partners willing to stand the cost of a worldwide trial
involving a great many more patients.

The costs of this could run into hundreds of millions of pounds, but early
discussions are already under way with a number of candidate companies.

The technique being tested involves the use of a nebuliser that injects a
fine spray into the airways. Within the spray are tiny soap-like bubbles
called liposomes containing DNA without the cystic fibrosis defect.

The liposomes fuse with the outer surfaces of cells lining the lungs and the
DNA passes by natural processes into their nuclei.

Once installed, it is hoped the DNA will prompt the cells to make the
essential protein lacking in cystic fibrosis sufferers.

Because of the constant replacement of cells in the body, the treatment
would have to be taken repeatedly to sustain its effect.

The scientists do not expect to provide a full cure, but Alton said: "What
makes this trial very novel is that we will for the first time be trying to
achieve clinical improvement rather than just alleviating symptoms."

Soon people soon <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-tongue.gif" border="0">

Ender
12-05-2006, 09:18 PM
Shortcut to: <a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.timesonl">http://www.timesonl</a> ine.co.uk/ article/0, ,2087-2484028, 00.html

The Sunday Times December 03, 2006

DNA spray offers cystic fibrosis hope
Jonathan Leake



British researchers are to trial a new gene therapy for cystic fibrosis in
which sufferers simply inhale a spray laden with DNA.
The announcement comes just days after Gordon Brown, the chancellor, and his
wife Sarah announced that their four-month-old son Fraser had been diagnosed
with the inherited condition.

If it works, the 20m programme could lead to a treatment that will improve
and extend the lives of thousands of cystic fibrosis sufferers around the
world.

"I'm optimistic. We've harnessed the best scientific talent in the UK and
they're very focused," said Rosie Barnes, chief executive of the Cystic
Fibrosis Trust, the charity that is funding most of the cost of the trial.
"If anybody's able to do it, they are."

The disease is caused by a defective gene that causes the lungs and airways
to fill with sticky mucus, which acts as a breeding ground for bacteria.

About one in 25 people unwittingly carry a copy of the defective gene. but
it proves harmful only if a child is unlucky enough to inherit two copies,
one from each parent.

About 10,000 people in Britain have cystic fibrosis. Most can expect to live
no more than 31 years and much of their life will be spent struggling to
control the symptoms, which can include liver failure and diabetes.

Researchers emphasise that such trials must be treated and publicised with
caution for fear of raising false hopes among sufferers. It will also take
at least three years for the early results to emerge.

However, the large-scale medical trials follow studies in animals and
smaller trials in humans that have already hinted at powerful benefits.

Professor Eric Alton, a specialist in gene therapy at the Brompton hospital
and Imperial College London, who is leading the study, said it would involve
200 patients at the Brompton in London and at the Western general hospital
in Edinburgh.

Half of these would be given the genuine therapy and half a "dummy"
treatment. Then their conditions would be compared to see if the therapy had
made a significant difference.

If the results are promising, the scientists expect to team up with one or
more private partners willing to stand the cost of a worldwide trial
involving a great many more patients.

The costs of this could run into hundreds of millions of pounds, but early
discussions are already under way with a number of candidate companies.

The technique being tested involves the use of a nebuliser that injects a
fine spray into the airways. Within the spray are tiny soap-like bubbles
called liposomes containing DNA without the cystic fibrosis defect.

The liposomes fuse with the outer surfaces of cells lining the lungs and the
DNA passes by natural processes into their nuclei.

Once installed, it is hoped the DNA will prompt the cells to make the
essential protein lacking in cystic fibrosis sufferers.

Because of the constant replacement of cells in the body, the treatment
would have to be taken repeatedly to sustain its effect.

The scientists do not expect to provide a full cure, but Alton said: "What
makes this trial very novel is that we will for the first time be trying to
achieve clinical improvement rather than just alleviating symptoms."

Soon people soon <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-tongue.gif" border="0">

Ender
12-05-2006, 09:18 PM
Shortcut to: <a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.timesonl">http://www.timesonl</a> ine.co.uk/ article/0, ,2087-2484028, 00.html

The Sunday Times December 03, 2006

DNA spray offers cystic fibrosis hope
Jonathan Leake



British researchers are to trial a new gene therapy for cystic fibrosis in
which sufferers simply inhale a spray laden with DNA.
The announcement comes just days after Gordon Brown, the chancellor, and his
wife Sarah announced that their four-month-old son Fraser had been diagnosed
with the inherited condition.

If it works, the 20m programme could lead to a treatment that will improve
and extend the lives of thousands of cystic fibrosis sufferers around the
world.

"I'm optimistic. We've harnessed the best scientific talent in the UK and
they're very focused," said Rosie Barnes, chief executive of the Cystic
Fibrosis Trust, the charity that is funding most of the cost of the trial.
"If anybody's able to do it, they are."

The disease is caused by a defective gene that causes the lungs and airways
to fill with sticky mucus, which acts as a breeding ground for bacteria.

About one in 25 people unwittingly carry a copy of the defective gene. but
it proves harmful only if a child is unlucky enough to inherit two copies,
one from each parent.

About 10,000 people in Britain have cystic fibrosis. Most can expect to live
no more than 31 years and much of their life will be spent struggling to
control the symptoms, which can include liver failure and diabetes.

Researchers emphasise that such trials must be treated and publicised with
caution for fear of raising false hopes among sufferers. It will also take
at least three years for the early results to emerge.

However, the large-scale medical trials follow studies in animals and
smaller trials in humans that have already hinted at powerful benefits.

Professor Eric Alton, a specialist in gene therapy at the Brompton hospital
and Imperial College London, who is leading the study, said it would involve
200 patients at the Brompton in London and at the Western general hospital
in Edinburgh.

Half of these would be given the genuine therapy and half a "dummy"
treatment. Then their conditions would be compared to see if the therapy had
made a significant difference.

If the results are promising, the scientists expect to team up with one or
more private partners willing to stand the cost of a worldwide trial
involving a great many more patients.

The costs of this could run into hundreds of millions of pounds, but early
discussions are already under way with a number of candidate companies.

The technique being tested involves the use of a nebuliser that injects a
fine spray into the airways. Within the spray are tiny soap-like bubbles
called liposomes containing DNA without the cystic fibrosis defect.

The liposomes fuse with the outer surfaces of cells lining the lungs and the
DNA passes by natural processes into their nuclei.

Once installed, it is hoped the DNA will prompt the cells to make the
essential protein lacking in cystic fibrosis sufferers.

Because of the constant replacement of cells in the body, the treatment
would have to be taken repeatedly to sustain its effect.

The scientists do not expect to provide a full cure, but Alton said: "What
makes this trial very novel is that we will for the first time be trying to
achieve clinical improvement rather than just alleviating symptoms."

Soon people soon <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-tongue.gif" border="0">

CowTown
12-06-2006, 01:55 AM
This is hard to believe....installing new DNA by inhalation? I don't buy it. Sounds too temporary to me, but I'm certainly not a scientist.

CowTown
12-06-2006, 01:55 AM
This is hard to believe....installing new DNA by inhalation? I don't buy it. Sounds too temporary to me, but I'm certainly not a scientist.

CowTown
12-06-2006, 01:55 AM
This is hard to believe....installing new DNA by inhalation? I don't buy it. Sounds too temporary to me, but I'm certainly not a scientist.

dyza
12-06-2006, 03:59 AM
what they are trying to achieve, i've looked further into this,is dificult. Just now it is working, in a very 'temporary' fashion,they need the spray to perform for a longer period of time, say a day or two, just now it works for an hour. my timings on this could be wrong, butI think that is the state of affairs.
They know what they want to do, and they know how to do it, was a quote I remember about this.

dyza
12-06-2006, 03:59 AM
what they are trying to achieve, i've looked further into this,is dificult. Just now it is working, in a very 'temporary' fashion,they need the spray to perform for a longer period of time, say a day or two, just now it works for an hour. my timings on this could be wrong, butI think that is the state of affairs.
They know what they want to do, and they know how to do it, was a quote I remember about this.

dyza
12-06-2006, 03:59 AM
what they are trying to achieve, i've looked further into this,is dificult. Just now it is working, in a very 'temporary' fashion,they need the spray to perform for a longer period of time, say a day or two, just now it works for an hour. my timings on this could be wrong, butI think that is the state of affairs.
They know what they want to do, and they know how to do it, was a quote I remember about this.

dyza
12-06-2006, 04:00 AM
the ''hehe'' in your subtobic heading Ender, whats that all about?

dyza
12-06-2006, 04:00 AM
the ''hehe'' in your subtobic heading Ender, whats that all about?

dyza
12-06-2006, 04:00 AM
the ''hehe'' in your subtobic heading Ender, whats that all about?