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CowTown
09-11-2006, 01:42 PM
We have some wood furniture, ie: bookshelves, and tables, that I want to sand and stain. I bought a hepa filter mask that protects against sanding dust and paint fumes. Has anyone done this and experienced the mask to work efficiently so there's no irritation? I enjoy doing this type of thing, but these days I'm a little more cautious. What do you think?

Chaggie
09-11-2006, 01:51 PM
I do wood working, There may be breathing problems with the mask,
but if you can tolerate it you shouldn't have any other problem.
 For other dust collection you can use a sander that has a bag
attachment, and don't forget the goggles.

Chaggie
09-11-2006, 01:52 PM
Also be sure to do any painting or staining in well ventilated
area.

princessjdc
09-11-2006, 03:56 PM
Ive used one of them when I was doing some sanding and staining adn painting in my garage, I believe it helped but it was annoying and it got hot, but its worth wearing, I had no problems breathing.

anonymous
09-11-2006, 04:01 PM
Kelly I have used one while painting the inside of our house. My husband and I decided to do the painting ourselves to save money. The mask helped alot but it does make it a little harder to breathe. Its a little restrictive. I ended up using it most of the time but had to take it for bits at a time. I say go for it!! Enjoy your projects!!
Khristina 31 yr old cfer

CowTown
09-11-2006, 05:51 PM
Oh good, all positive responses. Then I'll get going on the sanding!

Thanks for your replies.

CowTown
09-14-2006, 02:48 PM
Well, I did some of the staining last night, it was outside, well ventilated and I made sure my mask fit properly. I woke up this morning and my lungs are hurting when I breath in. What a huge bummer!!!!! It's been getting rainy here, so I can't tell if this liung thing is b/c I'm starting to get my cold back with the colder weather, or if it's from the staining. I have more to go too, and I really enjoy doing it. I don't know what to do. Try it one more time and see....maybe. What a drag. I guess my lungs are so sensitive, the little old farts. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-confused.gif" border="0">

Chaggie
09-14-2006, 02:56 PM
If you're doing it outside try it with a regular paper mask, the
cheap ones without the filter. &nbsp;It's the finish you need to
worry about more than the stain.

CowTown
09-14-2006, 03:05 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>Chaggie</b></i>

If you're doing it outside try it with a regular paper mask, the
cheap ones without the filter. It's the finish you need to
worry about more than the stain.</end quote></div>



Hey Chaggie,

I'm using the "Stain and Polyurethane in 1 step". It's all together in one can. I can't imagine not using the filter mask. Have you ever felt effected by polyurethane? I know it's powerful stuff and there are warnings all over it, but I thought this special mask would do the trick.

Chaggie
09-14-2006, 03:28 PM
I only use a filter if I am doing stuff with the garage door
closed. &nbsp;It's the fume buildup you need to be worried about,
if it's outside, obviously, there won't be that build up.
&nbsp;Some people are sensitive to the smell, cleaning products are
what get to me, urethane &nbsp;doesn't bother me at all. &nbsp;Like
everything else it's trial and error as to what is best for you.
&nbsp;It could also be the filter is putting an extra strain on
your lungs you're just not used to.

anonymous
09-14-2006, 07:03 PM
You should be using a respirator like what is below for paint fumes.

<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=186091-429-95090&lpage=none">http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn...1-429-95090&lpage=none</a>

CowTown
09-14-2006, 11:49 PM
Anon - Yes, I bought one just like that, but I'm wondering if the filters weren't correct or maybe I didn't screw them well enough. I went to look at them this morning and they were somewhat loosley on there.

Also the filters I got said it's for paint fumes and such, but I want to go to HomeDepot again and (as if they will know what they're talking about! but...) and double check on the best filter for what I'm doing. I know you have to select one that best correlates with what you want to protect yourselve against.

I guesss it's possible that it was too much exercise for my lungs having to breath through the mask, but I really think I'm doing better then that. I mean I jogged the day before and felt great lung wise.

Thanks for the responses.

Chaggie
09-15-2006, 12:55 AM
you'd be surprised at how constricting those things can be, alot of
constructionc companies make thier guys go through PFT's before
they will let you where them. &nbsp;I'm not sure what the OSHA
numbers are but they recommend under a certain amount not to use
them.

CowTown
09-15-2006, 01:37 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>Chaggie</b></i>

you'd be surprised at how constricting those things can be, alot of
constructionc companies make thier guys go through PFT's before
they will let you where them. I'm not sure what the OSHA
numbers are but they recommend under a certain amount not to use
them.</end quote></div>



I suppose that might include me, I'm at 46%. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-tongue.gif" border="0"> I'm sure there aren't many active construction workers out there with an fev1 in the 40s.

Thanks Chaggie for all your feedback!

Chaggie
09-15-2006, 02:00 AM
just trying to do my part.<img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-wink.gif" border="0">

anonymous
09-15-2006, 01:51 PM
If you can check your O2 sats with it on. I use one like this with my oxygen on and have no problems. I just turn my O2 up a bit higher with the mask on.