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blackchameleon
10-18-2006, 04:16 AM
just a quick enquiry to find out if anyone has any comments regarding any writtings from Jesus own hand? i was thinking today about the scriptures and wondered why there is nothing written by Jesus himself!!BC

blackchameleon
10-18-2006, 04:16 AM
just a quick enquiry to find out if anyone has any comments regarding any writtings from Jesus own hand? i was thinking today about the scriptures and wondered why there is nothing written by Jesus himself!!BC

blackchameleon
10-18-2006, 04:16 AM
just a quick enquiry to find out if anyone has any comments regarding any writtings from Jesus own hand? i was thinking today about the scriptures and wondered why there is nothing written by Jesus himself!!BC

Allie
10-18-2006, 03:36 PM
I'm not a Christian, so have no expertise there, we just went over the bible in college lol.

But, often in the Tanach, prophets were more likely to write about kings then the kings themselves were. Kings were not historians. I'm sure some writings of the kings survive, and I know secular record of them does, but as far as holy writ, prophets had more of the go. I know Jesus is considered a king to Christians, so maybe it's the same thing? No idea, just throwing ideas out there.

Allie
10-18-2006, 03:36 PM
I'm not a Christian, so have no expertise there, we just went over the bible in college lol.

But, often in the Tanach, prophets were more likely to write about kings then the kings themselves were. Kings were not historians. I'm sure some writings of the kings survive, and I know secular record of them does, but as far as holy writ, prophets had more of the go. I know Jesus is considered a king to Christians, so maybe it's the same thing? No idea, just throwing ideas out there.

Allie
10-18-2006, 03:36 PM
I'm not a Christian, so have no expertise there, we just went over the bible in college lol.

But, often in the Tanach, prophets were more likely to write about kings then the kings themselves were. Kings were not historians. I'm sure some writings of the kings survive, and I know secular record of them does, but as far as holy writ, prophets had more of the go. I know Jesus is considered a king to Christians, so maybe it's the same thing? No idea, just throwing ideas out there.

Mockingbird
10-25-2006, 02:17 PM
Jesus delegtated the writing to his disciples. It was to show whether Jesus speaks or one of His disciples speaks, there is no difference in authority, for both words are coming from the same place. Even if Jesus had written, it would not be greater than anything else in the Bible for that reason.

I know you are going to try bringing up Paul again, but before you do, consider John 14:16-17, 25-26, and recognize when I say His disciples, I am not only speaking of the twelve apostles, but all who are filled with the Holy Spirit.

Mockingbird
10-25-2006, 02:17 PM
Jesus delegtated the writing to his disciples. It was to show whether Jesus speaks or one of His disciples speaks, there is no difference in authority, for both words are coming from the same place. Even if Jesus had written, it would not be greater than anything else in the Bible for that reason.

I know you are going to try bringing up Paul again, but before you do, consider John 14:16-17, 25-26, and recognize when I say His disciples, I am not only speaking of the twelve apostles, but all who are filled with the Holy Spirit.

Mockingbird
10-25-2006, 02:17 PM
Jesus delegtated the writing to his disciples. It was to show whether Jesus speaks or one of His disciples speaks, there is no difference in authority, for both words are coming from the same place. Even if Jesus had written, it would not be greater than anything else in the Bible for that reason.

I know you are going to try bringing up Paul again, but before you do, consider John 14:16-17, 25-26, and recognize when I say His disciples, I am not only speaking of the twelve apostles, but all who are filled with the Holy Spirit.

Chaggie
10-25-2006, 02:35 PM
It all seems pretty convenient to me.

Chaggie
10-25-2006, 02:35 PM
It all seems pretty convenient to me.

Chaggie
10-25-2006, 02:35 PM
It all seems pretty convenient to me.

Scarlett81
10-26-2006, 12:15 AM
No he didn't physically in the Bible, but the apostles were inspired to write about his life on earth. 2 Timothy 3:16 says-All scripture is inspired by God. Paul wrote that many years after Jesus death. But I personally believe the Bible's writings were God putting his thoughts into man's hearts.

Scarlett81
10-26-2006, 12:15 AM
No he didn't physically in the Bible, but the apostles were inspired to write about his life on earth. 2 Timothy 3:16 says-All scripture is inspired by God. Paul wrote that many years after Jesus death. But I personally believe the Bible's writings were God putting his thoughts into man's hearts.

Scarlett81
10-26-2006, 12:15 AM
No he didn't physically in the Bible, but the apostles were inspired to write about his life on earth. 2 Timothy 3:16 says-All scripture is inspired by God. Paul wrote that many years after Jesus death. But I personally believe the Bible's writings were God putting his thoughts into man's hearts.

clinging2faith
02-24-2007, 05:41 PM
"Secularists, of course, will say that Jesus never wrote anything down because he was an illiterate carpenter. But, for the faithful, this logic is circular. That is, even if Jesus were an illiterate carpenter, we are still left with the equally perplexing (and functionally identical) question of why Jesus was an illiterate carpenter. If God had wanted Jesus to be well-read and educated, certainly he would have been.

Progressive Christians have explained that Jesus never wrote anything down because God never intended a text-based Christianity. Indeed, we have long pointed to this as a reason that Christians should look at how Jesus lived his life rather than to Paul's letters or to ancient Jewish texts in their search for Christian truth.

But I think that there's more to it than this.

How much time do Christians spend reading and rereading and rereading the Bible? How much time do Christians spend debating the import of obscure passages in the Old Testament? How much time do Christians spend trying to reconcile petty details in the Bible?

Can we justify such abstract intellectualism in the face of a world that is obviously very far from the Kingdom of God? If you have a few spare hours a week, wouldn't it be better to volunteer at a soup kitchen than to commit yourself to a "read-the-Bible-in-a-year" plan or a Bible study group? (What would Jesus do?)

I think that Jesus not writing anything down suggests that we should be acting more and reading and speculating less. I have long believed that Jesus' message was much simpler than the Church has made it out to be. Exceedingly easy to understand, exceedingly difficult to follow:

Love the Lord your God with all your heart, soul, mind and strength and love your neighbor as yourself. Help the poor. Heal the sick.

The message, spoken and lived, was simple. Clear. There was no need to write it down. You don't need to read thousands of pages; you don't need a degree in theology to understand Jesus' message."

(taken from Social Gospel Today)

Mary

clinging2faith
02-24-2007, 05:41 PM
"Secularists, of course, will say that Jesus never wrote anything down because he was an illiterate carpenter. But, for the faithful, this logic is circular. That is, even if Jesus were an illiterate carpenter, we are still left with the equally perplexing (and functionally identical) question of why Jesus was an illiterate carpenter. If God had wanted Jesus to be well-read and educated, certainly he would have been.

Progressive Christians have explained that Jesus never wrote anything down because God never intended a text-based Christianity. Indeed, we have long pointed to this as a reason that Christians should look at how Jesus lived his life rather than to Paul's letters or to ancient Jewish texts in their search for Christian truth.

But I think that there's more to it than this.

How much time do Christians spend reading and rereading and rereading the Bible? How much time do Christians spend debating the import of obscure passages in the Old Testament? How much time do Christians spend trying to reconcile petty details in the Bible?

Can we justify such abstract intellectualism in the face of a world that is obviously very far from the Kingdom of God? If you have a few spare hours a week, wouldn't it be better to volunteer at a soup kitchen than to commit yourself to a "read-the-Bible-in-a-year" plan or a Bible study group? (What would Jesus do?)

I think that Jesus not writing anything down suggests that we should be acting more and reading and speculating less. I have long believed that Jesus' message was much simpler than the Church has made it out to be. Exceedingly easy to understand, exceedingly difficult to follow:

Love the Lord your God with all your heart, soul, mind and strength and love your neighbor as yourself. Help the poor. Heal the sick.

The message, spoken and lived, was simple. Clear. There was no need to write it down. You don't need to read thousands of pages; you don't need a degree in theology to understand Jesus' message."

(taken from Social Gospel Today)

Mary

clinging2faith
02-24-2007, 05:41 PM
"Secularists, of course, will say that Jesus never wrote anything down because he was an illiterate carpenter. But, for the faithful, this logic is circular. That is, even if Jesus were an illiterate carpenter, we are still left with the equally perplexing (and functionally identical) question of why Jesus was an illiterate carpenter. If God had wanted Jesus to be well-read and educated, certainly he would have been.

Progressive Christians have explained that Jesus never wrote anything down because God never intended a text-based Christianity. Indeed, we have long pointed to this as a reason that Christians should look at how Jesus lived his life rather than to Paul's letters or to ancient Jewish texts in their search for Christian truth.

But I think that there's more to it than this.

How much time do Christians spend reading and rereading and rereading the Bible? How much time do Christians spend debating the import of obscure passages in the Old Testament? How much time do Christians spend trying to reconcile petty details in the Bible?

Can we justify such abstract intellectualism in the face of a world that is obviously very far from the Kingdom of God? If you have a few spare hours a week, wouldn't it be better to volunteer at a soup kitchen than to commit yourself to a "read-the-Bible-in-a-year" plan or a Bible study group? (What would Jesus do?)

I think that Jesus not writing anything down suggests that we should be acting more and reading and speculating less. I have long believed that Jesus' message was much simpler than the Church has made it out to be. Exceedingly easy to understand, exceedingly difficult to follow:

Love the Lord your God with all your heart, soul, mind and strength and love your neighbor as yourself. Help the poor. Heal the sick.

The message, spoken and lived, was simple. Clear. There was no need to write it down. You don't need to read thousands of pages; you don't need a degree in theology to understand Jesus' message."

(taken from Social Gospel Today)

Mary

markgw
02-25-2007, 09:50 AM
Jesus was a carpenter and most likely ( or almost certainly) not formally trained in a way similar to the Pharisees, say, but he was no Hick either, Trapping the religious scholars in their words at every turn and teaching in the Temple even as a boy. He continuously quoted from the Old Testament in his ministry. This say's two things to me. 1. He was not illiterate 2. He placed great value in the reading and thorough knowledge of scriptures.
It would seem odd to me that the redeemer of all mankind should sit down, pen in hand and jot down His own autobiography setting out his deeds and teaching for the salvation of humanity. Jesus was the Doer. This is where it disappoints me to so often here statements like "Jesus was a great teacher" because behind those types of statements is the thinking that he was some kind of wise scribe who penned his sayings for the betterment of Humanity - this really doesn't begin to touch what he has accomplished for us.
I agree in part with clinging2faith's quote above, The Bible does say 'Faith with out works is dead' but there is another side to that coin.The disciples were there for a reason, they weren't groupies, but among other things appointed as observers and recorders of Christ's Life and work. So I'm thinking God did intend a text-based Christianity on some level. From the first century until they were gathered together with the advent of the printing press, the fragmented gospels and letters of the NT were concealed, copied and smuggled by believers in the early church, often at the cost of their lives, to be read aloud and studied at underground meetings. I think it would be frivolous of us to take lightly this precious gift that has been handed down to us. But more importantly, the Word itself so strewn with exhortations to read scripture I don't know where to begin, but for a start try James 1;25 or in the OT Deuteronomy 8;3
Possibly the single most profound discovery for me personally was to come to the realization that the entire Old Testament has its fulfillment in the appearance and work of Jesus on earth. All of it.

markgw
02-25-2007, 09:50 AM
Jesus was a carpenter and most likely ( or almost certainly) not formally trained in a way similar to the Pharisees, say, but he was no Hick either, Trapping the religious scholars in their words at every turn and teaching in the Temple even as a boy. He continuously quoted from the Old Testament in his ministry. This say's two things to me. 1. He was not illiterate 2. He placed great value in the reading and thorough knowledge of scriptures.
It would seem odd to me that the redeemer of all mankind should sit down, pen in hand and jot down His own autobiography setting out his deeds and teaching for the salvation of humanity. Jesus was the Doer. This is where it disappoints me to so often here statements like "Jesus was a great teacher" because behind those types of statements is the thinking that he was some kind of wise scribe who penned his sayings for the betterment of Humanity - this really doesn't begin to touch what he has accomplished for us.
I agree in part with clinging2faith's quote above, The Bible does say 'Faith with out works is dead' but there is another side to that coin.The disciples were there for a reason, they weren't groupies, but among other things appointed as observers and recorders of Christ's Life and work. So I'm thinking God did intend a text-based Christianity on some level. From the first century until they were gathered together with the advent of the printing press, the fragmented gospels and letters of the NT were concealed, copied and smuggled by believers in the early church, often at the cost of their lives, to be read aloud and studied at underground meetings. I think it would be frivolous of us to take lightly this precious gift that has been handed down to us. But more importantly, the Word itself so strewn with exhortations to read scripture I don't know where to begin, but for a start try James 1;25 or in the OT Deuteronomy 8;3
Possibly the single most profound discovery for me personally was to come to the realization that the entire Old Testament has its fulfillment in the appearance and work of Jesus on earth. All of it.

markgw
02-25-2007, 09:50 AM
Jesus was a carpenter and most likely ( or almost certainly) not formally trained in a way similar to the Pharisees, say, but he was no Hick either, Trapping the religious scholars in their words at every turn and teaching in the Temple even as a boy. He continuously quoted from the Old Testament in his ministry. This say's two things to me. 1. He was not illiterate 2. He placed great value in the reading and thorough knowledge of scriptures.
It would seem odd to me that the redeemer of all mankind should sit down, pen in hand and jot down His own autobiography setting out his deeds and teaching for the salvation of humanity. Jesus was the Doer. This is where it disappoints me to so often here statements like "Jesus was a great teacher" because behind those types of statements is the thinking that he was some kind of wise scribe who penned his sayings for the betterment of Humanity - this really doesn't begin to touch what he has accomplished for us.
I agree in part with clinging2faith's quote above, The Bible does say 'Faith with out works is dead' but there is another side to that coin.The disciples were there for a reason, they weren't groupies, but among other things appointed as observers and recorders of Christ's Life and work. So I'm thinking God did intend a text-based Christianity on some level. From the first century until they were gathered together with the advent of the printing press, the fragmented gospels and letters of the NT were concealed, copied and smuggled by believers in the early church, often at the cost of their lives, to be read aloud and studied at underground meetings. I think it would be frivolous of us to take lightly this precious gift that has been handed down to us. But more importantly, the Word itself so strewn with exhortations to read scripture I don't know where to begin, but for a start try James 1;25 or in the OT Deuteronomy 8;3
Possibly the single most profound discovery for me personally was to come to the realization that the entire Old Testament has its fulfillment in the appearance and work of Jesus on earth. All of it.