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lightNlife
01-15-2007, 06:54 AM
<i>Introduction and Background</i>

Most mainstream commercial-grade food products contain additives of some sort. Simply put, an additive is anything that is not naturally part of the food. In other words, they are something that is added to promote flavor, appearance, smell, shelf-life, even nutritive content. Controversy abounds as to whether additives are harmful or harmless. Overall, the evidence is largely overwhelming in favor of additives. America has the safest and most quality controlled food in the world.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) dutifully regulates the use of both direct and indirect additives. It is a common misconception that food additives are chemicals that have no business being ingested by humans and pose certain health risks. This is not the case. In reality, additives may actually help make certain foods beneficial. Furthermore, prior to approval by the FDA, food additives must undergo many levels of testing to ensure that they are safe for consumption.
<i>
Emulsifiers
</i>
Emulsifiers are used as thickening agents. They improve the overall consistency and smoothness of texture in foods such as sauces, ice cream, creams, jams and jellies. Emulsifiers also keep oil and water from separating in some soups and condiments. Common names for these particular additives include:

<UL>Carrageenan
Cellulose
Glycerol
Guar gum
Lecithin
Pectin</UL>

Carrageenan is extracted from red algae. Because of its water solubility, it is most often used to enhance the creaminess of certain foods. It forms a gel in hot water, and is typically an additive in tomato sauces, salad dressings, cheese products, ice cream and chocolate milk mix powder.

The main component of plant and tissue fiber, cellulose, is a complex carbohydrate. It is a large molecule made up of glucose. As a polysaccharide, it is indigestible. Refined cellulose is most often present in whole-grain cereals.

Glycerol is a type of alcohol substance that is the main component in fatty acids. It is made naturally by the body in animals and plants. It provides a distinct sweetness in taste, making it widely popular as an additive in certain wines.

Guar gum is also referred to as jaguar gum or guar flour. It is a natural resin from the seeds of the guar plant. Aside from its use as an emulsifier, it is commonly used as an herbal supplement to curb the appetite. Guar is sometimes used as a preservative; it also helps the body rid itself of toxins.

Naturally present in egg yolk and the fat from soybeans, lecithin is a natural anti-oxidant. It prevents oils and butters from becoming rancid. Lecithin is rich in B vitamins, which enables it to aid liver function. It may also promote the brain's ability to store memory. It also helps the body digest fats.

Pectin is found in the cell walls of plants, and is therefore a naturally occurring substance in many fruits and vegetables. Pectin has been shown to have the ability to act as an antibacterial and antifungal. It also has the potential to lower high cholesterol. Pectin is a complex carbohydrate, comprised of long chains of sugar molecules.

<i>Preservatives</i>

Preservatives generally fall into one of two main categories: antimicrobials and antioxidants. Preservatives that are antimicrobials help protect the food product from fungi and bacteria, thereby extending its shelf life. In dried foods, preservatives of this type enhance the food's overall appearance by preventing the food from losing its color. Main antimicrobials include:

<UL>Benzoic acid
Nitrites/Nitrates
Sulfites</UL>

Benzoic acid occurs naturally in some plants. It is found in sodas, beer, fruit products, margarine and some acidic foods. Nitrites are used in many processed meats. It is a naturally occurring chemical product that results from oxidation of ammonia. Although it is a particularly useful preservative, recent evidence suggests that it may be harmful to the body in higher concentrations. For this reason, the use of nitrates and nitrites is rapidly declining in the meat industry.

Sulfites are natural by-products of fermentation, which is why they are so common in wine. As a preservative they help protect the food from bacteria. They are, for the most part, safe since the body can break down this compound by means of the enzyme sulfite oxidase. However, foods containing sulfites should be avoided by people with asthma.

Perhaps the most widely recognizable antioxidant is vitamin C. The technical term for this vitamin is ascorbic acid. It prevents fruit juices from taking on a brownish color. It also enhances the baking quality of wheat. Another well-known antioxidant is tocopherol also known as vitamin E. Oils and shortening are the likely foods in which vitamin E is used as an additive. It helps keep the food from spoiling in the presence of oxygen.

<i>Food Coloring</i>

A variety of candies and other confectionary foods contain food colorings or dyes. The majority of these additives are safe. However, recently two specific dyes (red 2 and violet 1) were removed from the market when evidence suggested that they may be carcinogenic. Ever since, the FDA has increased the rigidity of its safety standards for such additives. Currently there are only 9 man-made color additives that the FDA permits for use.

<i>Conclusion</i>

The majority of food additives are completely safe. Only in the rarest of occasions do they cause problems for a decidedly small segment of the population. There is little evidence linking food additives to major health risks. The benefits of food additives far outweigh the presumed potential harm. They keep foods from spoiling, they enhance flavor, and in many instances, improve the overall nutritional content.

Those who have an aversion to additives in any form, whole foods or organic foods may be a better avenue.





Copyright (c) 2006. All Rights Reserved. This article may not be reproduced in any form without consent or permission from the author.

lightNlife
01-15-2007, 06:54 AM
<i>Introduction and Background</i>

Most mainstream commercial-grade food products contain additives of some sort. Simply put, an additive is anything that is not naturally part of the food. In other words, they are something that is added to promote flavor, appearance, smell, shelf-life, even nutritive content. Controversy abounds as to whether additives are harmful or harmless. Overall, the evidence is largely overwhelming in favor of additives. America has the safest and most quality controlled food in the world.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) dutifully regulates the use of both direct and indirect additives. It is a common misconception that food additives are chemicals that have no business being ingested by humans and pose certain health risks. This is not the case. In reality, additives may actually help make certain foods beneficial. Furthermore, prior to approval by the FDA, food additives must undergo many levels of testing to ensure that they are safe for consumption.
<i>
Emulsifiers
</i>
Emulsifiers are used as thickening agents. They improve the overall consistency and smoothness of texture in foods such as sauces, ice cream, creams, jams and jellies. Emulsifiers also keep oil and water from separating in some soups and condiments. Common names for these particular additives include:

<UL>Carrageenan
Cellulose
Glycerol
Guar gum
Lecithin
Pectin</UL>

Carrageenan is extracted from red algae. Because of its water solubility, it is most often used to enhance the creaminess of certain foods. It forms a gel in hot water, and is typically an additive in tomato sauces, salad dressings, cheese products, ice cream and chocolate milk mix powder.

The main component of plant and tissue fiber, cellulose, is a complex carbohydrate. It is a large molecule made up of glucose. As a polysaccharide, it is indigestible. Refined cellulose is most often present in whole-grain cereals.

Glycerol is a type of alcohol substance that is the main component in fatty acids. It is made naturally by the body in animals and plants. It provides a distinct sweetness in taste, making it widely popular as an additive in certain wines.

Guar gum is also referred to as jaguar gum or guar flour. It is a natural resin from the seeds of the guar plant. Aside from its use as an emulsifier, it is commonly used as an herbal supplement to curb the appetite. Guar is sometimes used as a preservative; it also helps the body rid itself of toxins.

Naturally present in egg yolk and the fat from soybeans, lecithin is a natural anti-oxidant. It prevents oils and butters from becoming rancid. Lecithin is rich in B vitamins, which enables it to aid liver function. It may also promote the brain's ability to store memory. It also helps the body digest fats.

Pectin is found in the cell walls of plants, and is therefore a naturally occurring substance in many fruits and vegetables. Pectin has been shown to have the ability to act as an antibacterial and antifungal. It also has the potential to lower high cholesterol. Pectin is a complex carbohydrate, comprised of long chains of sugar molecules.

<i>Preservatives</i>

Preservatives generally fall into one of two main categories: antimicrobials and antioxidants. Preservatives that are antimicrobials help protect the food product from fungi and bacteria, thereby extending its shelf life. In dried foods, preservatives of this type enhance the food's overall appearance by preventing the food from losing its color. Main antimicrobials include:

<UL>Benzoic acid
Nitrites/Nitrates
Sulfites</UL>

Benzoic acid occurs naturally in some plants. It is found in sodas, beer, fruit products, margarine and some acidic foods. Nitrites are used in many processed meats. It is a naturally occurring chemical product that results from oxidation of ammonia. Although it is a particularly useful preservative, recent evidence suggests that it may be harmful to the body in higher concentrations. For this reason, the use of nitrates and nitrites is rapidly declining in the meat industry.

Sulfites are natural by-products of fermentation, which is why they are so common in wine. As a preservative they help protect the food from bacteria. They are, for the most part, safe since the body can break down this compound by means of the enzyme sulfite oxidase. However, foods containing sulfites should be avoided by people with asthma.

Perhaps the most widely recognizable antioxidant is vitamin C. The technical term for this vitamin is ascorbic acid. It prevents fruit juices from taking on a brownish color. It also enhances the baking quality of wheat. Another well-known antioxidant is tocopherol also known as vitamin E. Oils and shortening are the likely foods in which vitamin E is used as an additive. It helps keep the food from spoiling in the presence of oxygen.

<i>Food Coloring</i>

A variety of candies and other confectionary foods contain food colorings or dyes. The majority of these additives are safe. However, recently two specific dyes (red 2 and violet 1) were removed from the market when evidence suggested that they may be carcinogenic. Ever since, the FDA has increased the rigidity of its safety standards for such additives. Currently there are only 9 man-made color additives that the FDA permits for use.

<i>Conclusion</i>

The majority of food additives are completely safe. Only in the rarest of occasions do they cause problems for a decidedly small segment of the population. There is little evidence linking food additives to major health risks. The benefits of food additives far outweigh the presumed potential harm. They keep foods from spoiling, they enhance flavor, and in many instances, improve the overall nutritional content.

Those who have an aversion to additives in any form, whole foods or organic foods may be a better avenue.





Copyright (c) 2006. All Rights Reserved. This article may not be reproduced in any form without consent or permission from the author.

lightNlife
01-15-2007, 06:54 AM
<i>Introduction and Background</i>

Most mainstream commercial-grade food products contain additives of some sort. Simply put, an additive is anything that is not naturally part of the food. In other words, they are something that is added to promote flavor, appearance, smell, shelf-life, even nutritive content. Controversy abounds as to whether additives are harmful or harmless. Overall, the evidence is largely overwhelming in favor of additives. America has the safest and most quality controlled food in the world.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) dutifully regulates the use of both direct and indirect additives. It is a common misconception that food additives are chemicals that have no business being ingested by humans and pose certain health risks. This is not the case. In reality, additives may actually help make certain foods beneficial. Furthermore, prior to approval by the FDA, food additives must undergo many levels of testing to ensure that they are safe for consumption.
<i>
Emulsifiers
</i>
Emulsifiers are used as thickening agents. They improve the overall consistency and smoothness of texture in foods such as sauces, ice cream, creams, jams and jellies. Emulsifiers also keep oil and water from separating in some soups and condiments. Common names for these particular additives include:

<UL>Carrageenan
Cellulose
Glycerol
Guar gum
Lecithin
Pectin</UL>

Carrageenan is extracted from red algae. Because of its water solubility, it is most often used to enhance the creaminess of certain foods. It forms a gel in hot water, and is typically an additive in tomato sauces, salad dressings, cheese products, ice cream and chocolate milk mix powder.

The main component of plant and tissue fiber, cellulose, is a complex carbohydrate. It is a large molecule made up of glucose. As a polysaccharide, it is indigestible. Refined cellulose is most often present in whole-grain cereals.

Glycerol is a type of alcohol substance that is the main component in fatty acids. It is made naturally by the body in animals and plants. It provides a distinct sweetness in taste, making it widely popular as an additive in certain wines.

Guar gum is also referred to as jaguar gum or guar flour. It is a natural resin from the seeds of the guar plant. Aside from its use as an emulsifier, it is commonly used as an herbal supplement to curb the appetite. Guar is sometimes used as a preservative; it also helps the body rid itself of toxins.

Naturally present in egg yolk and the fat from soybeans, lecithin is a natural anti-oxidant. It prevents oils and butters from becoming rancid. Lecithin is rich in B vitamins, which enables it to aid liver function. It may also promote the brain's ability to store memory. It also helps the body digest fats.

Pectin is found in the cell walls of plants, and is therefore a naturally occurring substance in many fruits and vegetables. Pectin has been shown to have the ability to act as an antibacterial and antifungal. It also has the potential to lower high cholesterol. Pectin is a complex carbohydrate, comprised of long chains of sugar molecules.

<i>Preservatives</i>

Preservatives generally fall into one of two main categories: antimicrobials and antioxidants. Preservatives that are antimicrobials help protect the food product from fungi and bacteria, thereby extending its shelf life. In dried foods, preservatives of this type enhance the food's overall appearance by preventing the food from losing its color. Main antimicrobials include:

<UL>Benzoic acid
Nitrites/Nitrates
Sulfites</UL>

Benzoic acid occurs naturally in some plants. It is found in sodas, beer, fruit products, margarine and some acidic foods. Nitrites are used in many processed meats. It is a naturally occurring chemical product that results from oxidation of ammonia. Although it is a particularly useful preservative, recent evidence suggests that it may be harmful to the body in higher concentrations. For this reason, the use of nitrates and nitrites is rapidly declining in the meat industry.

Sulfites are natural by-products of fermentation, which is why they are so common in wine. As a preservative they help protect the food from bacteria. They are, for the most part, safe since the body can break down this compound by means of the enzyme sulfite oxidase. However, foods containing sulfites should be avoided by people with asthma.

Perhaps the most widely recognizable antioxidant is vitamin C. The technical term for this vitamin is ascorbic acid. It prevents fruit juices from taking on a brownish color. It also enhances the baking quality of wheat. Another well-known antioxidant is tocopherol also known as vitamin E. Oils and shortening are the likely foods in which vitamin E is used as an additive. It helps keep the food from spoiling in the presence of oxygen.

<i>Food Coloring</i>

A variety of candies and other confectionary foods contain food colorings or dyes. The majority of these additives are safe. However, recently two specific dyes (red 2 and violet 1) were removed from the market when evidence suggested that they may be carcinogenic. Ever since, the FDA has increased the rigidity of its safety standards for such additives. Currently there are only 9 man-made color additives that the FDA permits for use.

<i>Conclusion</i>

The majority of food additives are completely safe. Only in the rarest of occasions do they cause problems for a decidedly small segment of the population. There is little evidence linking food additives to major health risks. The benefits of food additives far outweigh the presumed potential harm. They keep foods from spoiling, they enhance flavor, and in many instances, improve the overall nutritional content.

Those who have an aversion to additives in any form, whole foods or organic foods may be a better avenue.





Copyright (c) 2006. All Rights Reserved. This article may not be reproduced in any form without consent or permission from the author.

dramamama
01-15-2007, 01:54 PM
Ok, you are scientist....but are you insane? Are you actually in favor of these things being addes to your food? There are studies on so many of these additives and that they are harmful. One I will find and post is regarding nitrites/nitrates and lung health....nitrites actually damage the elasticity of the lungs. Having cf, I am sure how you can see this harmful. No offense, but you are a scientist for whom? Where did you get your degrees? and who pays your bills? I would love to see all of your data on these additives and any info and studies you have in the last few years(say 2) that backs them up. I am sure I can find equally as many to suggest that a person with an inflammatory disease should stay away from them.

dramamama
01-15-2007, 01:54 PM
Ok, you are scientist....but are you insane? Are you actually in favor of these things being addes to your food? There are studies on so many of these additives and that they are harmful. One I will find and post is regarding nitrites/nitrates and lung health....nitrites actually damage the elasticity of the lungs. Having cf, I am sure how you can see this harmful. No offense, but you are a scientist for whom? Where did you get your degrees? and who pays your bills? I would love to see all of your data on these additives and any info and studies you have in the last few years(say 2) that backs them up. I am sure I can find equally as many to suggest that a person with an inflammatory disease should stay away from them.

dramamama
01-15-2007, 01:54 PM
Ok, you are scientist....but are you insane? Are you actually in favor of these things being addes to your food? There are studies on so many of these additives and that they are harmful. One I will find and post is regarding nitrites/nitrates and lung health....nitrites actually damage the elasticity of the lungs. Having cf, I am sure how you can see this harmful. No offense, but you are a scientist for whom? Where did you get your degrees? and who pays your bills? I would love to see all of your data on these additives and any info and studies you have in the last few years(say 2) that backs them up. I am sure I can find equally as many to suggest that a person with an inflammatory disease should stay away from them.

dramamama
01-15-2007, 01:59 PM
ps I just reread your post.....i think I may have over-reacted. I was under the impression that you felt they were important food additives.
sorry about that. Just don't want people with cf not doing the research....and falling into the, "if it's good enough for the fda...."
my bad...I see you were just trying to educate us
m

dramamama
01-15-2007, 01:59 PM
ps I just reread your post.....i think I may have over-reacted. I was under the impression that you felt they were important food additives.
sorry about that. Just don't want people with cf not doing the research....and falling into the, "if it's good enough for the fda...."
my bad...I see you were just trying to educate us
m

dramamama
01-15-2007, 01:59 PM
ps I just reread your post.....i think I may have over-reacted. I was under the impression that you felt they were important food additives.
sorry about that. Just don't want people with cf not doing the research....and falling into the, "if it's good enough for the fda...."
my bad...I see you were just trying to educate us
m

LouLou
01-15-2007, 02:37 PM
I have trouble with Yellow #5 (Tartrazines) as do many people. There is a petition to get it listed on foods like MSG is. Although recently it seems MSG doesn't get called out anywhere other than on the ingredient list. I also suspect I have problems with Salicylates. If I have a lot of food - I mean over a few weeks - with these colorings my body stock piles it (doesn't flush it) and I end up with hives. In the last 6 months I helped another CFer on here learn of her allergy to Tartrazine and Salicylates. Her symptoms were different but nonetheless negative.

I have always avoided nitrates - no hotdogs or processed foods for me because of them being bad for my health. I eat exclusively Boar's Head Lunchmeat because they do not use nitrates.

LouLou
01-15-2007, 02:37 PM
I have trouble with Yellow #5 (Tartrazines) as do many people. There is a petition to get it listed on foods like MSG is. Although recently it seems MSG doesn't get called out anywhere other than on the ingredient list. I also suspect I have problems with Salicylates. If I have a lot of food - I mean over a few weeks - with these colorings my body stock piles it (doesn't flush it) and I end up with hives. In the last 6 months I helped another CFer on here learn of her allergy to Tartrazine and Salicylates. Her symptoms were different but nonetheless negative.

I have always avoided nitrates - no hotdogs or processed foods for me because of them being bad for my health. I eat exclusively Boar's Head Lunchmeat because they do not use nitrates.

LouLou
01-15-2007, 02:37 PM
I have trouble with Yellow #5 (Tartrazines) as do many people. There is a petition to get it listed on foods like MSG is. Although recently it seems MSG doesn't get called out anywhere other than on the ingredient list. I also suspect I have problems with Salicylates. If I have a lot of food - I mean over a few weeks - with these colorings my body stock piles it (doesn't flush it) and I end up with hives. In the last 6 months I helped another CFer on here learn of her allergy to Tartrazine and Salicylates. Her symptoms were different but nonetheless negative.

I have always avoided nitrates - no hotdogs or processed foods for me because of them being bad for my health. I eat exclusively Boar's Head Lunchmeat because they do not use nitrates.

SEANP
01-15-2007, 04:14 PM
Hi,
Thanks for the info, very interesting. Explains why if I drink wine the next day sometimes my asthma will act up a bit. I do recall that they were doing studies about using sodium nitrite to battle Pseudomonas. Has any one heard anymore about this?
Sean

SEANP
01-15-2007, 04:14 PM
Hi,
Thanks for the info, very interesting. Explains why if I drink wine the next day sometimes my asthma will act up a bit. I do recall that they were doing studies about using sodium nitrite to battle Pseudomonas. Has any one heard anymore about this?
Sean

SEANP
01-15-2007, 04:14 PM
Hi,
Thanks for the info, very interesting. Explains why if I drink wine the next day sometimes my asthma will act up a bit. I do recall that they were doing studies about using sodium nitrite to battle Pseudomonas. Has any one heard anymore about this?
Sean

Chaggie
01-15-2007, 04:25 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>SEANP</b></i>

Hi,
Thanks for the info, very interesting. Explains why if I drink wine the next day sometimes my asthma will act up a bit. I do recall that they were doing studies about using sodium nitrite to battle Pseudomonas. Has any one heard anymore about this?
Sean</end quote></div>


Here's a good article on <a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://healthnews.uc.edu/news/?/887/">sodium nitirite and pseudomonas.</a>

Chaggie
01-15-2007, 04:25 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>SEANP</b></i>

Hi,
Thanks for the info, very interesting. Explains why if I drink wine the next day sometimes my asthma will act up a bit. I do recall that they were doing studies about using sodium nitrite to battle Pseudomonas. Has any one heard anymore about this?
Sean</end quote></div>


Here's a good article on <a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://healthnews.uc.edu/news/?/887/">sodium nitirite and pseudomonas.</a>

Chaggie
01-15-2007, 04:25 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>SEANP</b></i>

Hi,
Thanks for the info, very interesting. Explains why if I drink wine the next day sometimes my asthma will act up a bit. I do recall that they were doing studies about using sodium nitrite to battle Pseudomonas. Has any one heard anymore about this?
Sean</end quote></div>


Here's a good article on <a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://healthnews.uc.edu/news/?/887/">sodium nitirite and pseudomonas.</a>

lightNlife
01-15-2007, 08:28 PM
A small percentage of the population may react to certain additives. That does not mean they are not safe for the GENERAL population. Certainly people with CF need to be more careful about what they take into their bodies.

Think of it this way...some people's bodies react badly to certain additives. Some people's bodies also respond negatively to perfumes. If you're a person for whom a reaction happens, then AVOID the trigger instead of saying that all additives (or all perfumes) are bad.

The article was written from a general point of view. The target audience was not the CF population, but I figured it was helpful to understand some of the names we read in ingredients labels.

Some additives that are suspected to create problems include aspartame (unconfirmed), monosodium glutamate (MSG) and nitrates. Again, these do not cause problems for everyone, only certain populations.

Dramamama, lest you think I'm posting propaganda, things I write on many topics are the result of careful personal evaluation and study. Who I work for and who pays my bills has nothing to do with my integrity as a scientist and a member of the CF community.

lightNlife
01-15-2007, 08:28 PM
A small percentage of the population may react to certain additives. That does not mean they are not safe for the GENERAL population. Certainly people with CF need to be more careful about what they take into their bodies.

Think of it this way...some people's bodies react badly to certain additives. Some people's bodies also respond negatively to perfumes. If you're a person for whom a reaction happens, then AVOID the trigger instead of saying that all additives (or all perfumes) are bad.

The article was written from a general point of view. The target audience was not the CF population, but I figured it was helpful to understand some of the names we read in ingredients labels.

Some additives that are suspected to create problems include aspartame (unconfirmed), monosodium glutamate (MSG) and nitrates. Again, these do not cause problems for everyone, only certain populations.

Dramamama, lest you think I'm posting propaganda, things I write on many topics are the result of careful personal evaluation and study. Who I work for and who pays my bills has nothing to do with my integrity as a scientist and a member of the CF community.

lightNlife
01-15-2007, 08:28 PM
A small percentage of the population may react to certain additives. That does not mean they are not safe for the GENERAL population. Certainly people with CF need to be more careful about what they take into their bodies.

Think of it this way...some people's bodies react badly to certain additives. Some people's bodies also respond negatively to perfumes. If you're a person for whom a reaction happens, then AVOID the trigger instead of saying that all additives (or all perfumes) are bad.

The article was written from a general point of view. The target audience was not the CF population, but I figured it was helpful to understand some of the names we read in ingredients labels.

Some additives that are suspected to create problems include aspartame (unconfirmed), monosodium glutamate (MSG) and nitrates. Again, these do not cause problems for everyone, only certain populations.

Dramamama, lest you think I'm posting propaganda, things I write on many topics are the result of careful personal evaluation and study. Who I work for and who pays my bills has nothing to do with my integrity as a scientist and a member of the CF community.

JRPandTJP
01-17-2007, 04:05 AM
Okay, some additives are natural and some like absorbic acid help preserve canned and packaged goods. Where the problem occurs is the careless addition of things which are not necessary to the safety of the food such as MSG, BHT, BHA, DES, Nitrosamines (all known carcinogens) when a safer and healthier choice is available. This is what concerns me about the long list of "stuff" in processed and packaged goods and this is what makes it hard on the consumer.

I have issue with food dyes being on your list as safe. If I'm not mistaken food dyes (the FDA approved ones) are derived from coal tar which is carcinogenic. The FDA receives compensation for every pound of food dye it certifies (not inspects), which many see as a conflict of interest in regard to the safety of these dyes.

Color is and can be added from natural concentrates of foods rich in the color desired (beets, tumeric, saffron, paprika), but this is not done much in large commercially processed foods. I like labels which list the source of the additives used in their product (ie red color derived from beet root concentrate). This is an additive I can say yes to. Most of the time dyes are added because the original food being prepared looses its color in processing. Other reasons are marketability of the products like adding bright colors to products meant to attract kids. Both are questionable practices in my opinion.

Saying there is "little evidence linking food additives to major health risks" and "the benefits far outweigh the presumed potential harm" is dependent upon which ones you're speaking about. You simply can not lump many of the ones you list in you article with most of the substances listed on many packaged good labels today.

JRPandTJP
01-17-2007, 04:05 AM
Okay, some additives are natural and some like absorbic acid help preserve canned and packaged goods. Where the problem occurs is the careless addition of things which are not necessary to the safety of the food such as MSG, BHT, BHA, DES, Nitrosamines (all known carcinogens) when a safer and healthier choice is available. This is what concerns me about the long list of "stuff" in processed and packaged goods and this is what makes it hard on the consumer.

I have issue with food dyes being on your list as safe. If I'm not mistaken food dyes (the FDA approved ones) are derived from coal tar which is carcinogenic. The FDA receives compensation for every pound of food dye it certifies (not inspects), which many see as a conflict of interest in regard to the safety of these dyes.

Color is and can be added from natural concentrates of foods rich in the color desired (beets, tumeric, saffron, paprika), but this is not done much in large commercially processed foods. I like labels which list the source of the additives used in their product (ie red color derived from beet root concentrate). This is an additive I can say yes to. Most of the time dyes are added because the original food being prepared looses its color in processing. Other reasons are marketability of the products like adding bright colors to products meant to attract kids. Both are questionable practices in my opinion.

Saying there is "little evidence linking food additives to major health risks" and "the benefits far outweigh the presumed potential harm" is dependent upon which ones you're speaking about. You simply can not lump many of the ones you list in you article with most of the substances listed on many packaged good labels today.

JRPandTJP
01-17-2007, 04:05 AM
Okay, some additives are natural and some like absorbic acid help preserve canned and packaged goods. Where the problem occurs is the careless addition of things which are not necessary to the safety of the food such as MSG, BHT, BHA, DES, Nitrosamines (all known carcinogens) when a safer and healthier choice is available. This is what concerns me about the long list of "stuff" in processed and packaged goods and this is what makes it hard on the consumer.

I have issue with food dyes being on your list as safe. If I'm not mistaken food dyes (the FDA approved ones) are derived from coal tar which is carcinogenic. The FDA receives compensation for every pound of food dye it certifies (not inspects), which many see as a conflict of interest in regard to the safety of these dyes.

Color is and can be added from natural concentrates of foods rich in the color desired (beets, tumeric, saffron, paprika), but this is not done much in large commercially processed foods. I like labels which list the source of the additives used in their product (ie red color derived from beet root concentrate). This is an additive I can say yes to. Most of the time dyes are added because the original food being prepared looses its color in processing. Other reasons are marketability of the products like adding bright colors to products meant to attract kids. Both are questionable practices in my opinion.

Saying there is "little evidence linking food additives to major health risks" and "the benefits far outweigh the presumed potential harm" is dependent upon which ones you're speaking about. You simply can not lump many of the ones you list in you article with most of the substances listed on many packaged good labels today.

EnergyGal
01-17-2007, 10:10 AM
Thank you Jody

EnergyGal
01-17-2007, 10:10 AM
Thank you Jody

EnergyGal
01-17-2007, 10:10 AM
Thank you Jody