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TCNJcystic
11-21-2005, 08:17 PM
I just wanted to know who out there was a musician. I have been playing wind instruments since I was 10, and they have dramatically helped my lung function. I wanted to recommend this practice to parents who have children who may be readey to play an instrument.

Emeraldmirror
11-21-2005, 08:18 PM
I used to play the flute, I played for about... 10 years and took lessons and stuff.. but i really don't like theory, so I never kept it up.


Ashley 21w/cf

princessjdc
11-21-2005, 09:10 PM
saxophone for me, but I only play every now and then

anonymous
11-22-2005, 02:22 AM
Finally musicians! lol...I play the tuba...I started on clarinet, then switched to tuba as a joke and ended up loving it. I majored in music education (on tuba) for two years and learned all brass and wind instruments...I am now a biology major though (not b/c of my cf, music teachers don't hold the greatest jobs where I'm from). I'm still playin the tuba though in college wind ensemble. Don't be fooled though...I'm not your average tuba player...I'm a skinny girl who looks like she could be crushed by the tuba. It's great for the lungs though...both playing it and carrying it. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-tongue.gif" border="0">

erin
20/f/cf

TCNJcystic
11-22-2005, 12:15 PM
I'm music ed as wel....its tough times man. Definitely one of the hardest majors my school has to offer.

IG
11-22-2005, 12:30 PM
I play the flute I have for years, I credit it for putting off my need for a transplant for as long as it did.

My previous band director [long story short] had CF and a double lung transplant as well.

anonymous
11-23-2005, 12:55 PM
Has anyone ever played an instrument that involved using a reed? My daughter plays oboe and goes through alot of reeds. The little plastic ring that holds the reed together literally disintegrates in a very short time & they can't figure out what is causing this. I am wondering if it is possibly due to the high levels of salt in the saliva that is breaking them down. Would love to hear if anyone has any comments on this.

JazzysMom
11-23-2005, 01:22 PM
I personally havent played them, but I know reeds can be very sensitive. It could very well be the salt or just the thick saliva that would sit longer then the average saliva. I dont think there is much that can be done, but maybe you will here from someone with actual experience!

anonymous
11-23-2005, 02:37 PM
I play a reed instrument, although not oboe. I have never had problems with the salt content in my saliva effecting a reed before, though my (sax/clarinet) mouthpieces tend to get dirtier than most other musicians'. What I can tell you is that of all the reed instruments, oboe and bassoon have the most sensitive reeds due to the fact that they are double reed instruments. Whereas sax and clarinet reeds vibrate against a plastic or metal mouthpiece, the oboe and bassoon reeds vibrate against each other, making the reed as a whole ultra-sensitive. If your daughter is having trouble with reeds on oboe, I suggest talking to her music teacher first, and pursuing a CF explanation second. I don't mean to rule out a CF explanation, though because like I said, my mouthpieces tend to get more residue than most.

anonymous
11-23-2005, 02:51 PM
We have talked to her music teacher. They even had the company that we are renting the oboe from to check out her instrument to make sure there wasn't a problem. So we exhausted those avenues and that was what brought us to the CF possibly having something to do with the problem. She loves playing Oboe - so she will definitely continue. It has also helped her alot with her PFT's - we've noted a remarkable increase in her numbers since she started playing.

supermanfan
11-23-2005, 03:24 PM
I played piano when I was very young, and in Jr. High I played the Clarinet... I still play piano, not as much as I'd like, but my life is pretty busy right now. As things settle down, I'm hoping to get back to the piano.