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Skye
04-07-2010, 10:53 PM
I have a "distance" friend who has had recent cultures that grow a gram negative species and results have come back statig that it has been identified as belonging to the burkholderia cepacia complex family. After months of analyzing it and more cultures it has been determined to be a burkholderia contaminent and they have ruled out the more popular or well known species. So it is an unidentifiable contaminent. My friend has been stable and did a course of IV's when first identified. The bug is sensitive to many antibiotics. They use infection control procedures and since it is identified in the "family" they use extra precautions.

I guess my question is. What are some of the myths about burkholderia Cepacia Complex and what is evolving in this field? It seems that so many more people are being identified with some kind of species and I see so many people here who have had it for years. It is confusing for me. Is testing getting better? Are more strains being found? Do different strains cause different outcomes? It just seems like an area that is evolving and changing so much that it is hard to keep up with.

Skye
04-07-2010, 10:53 PM
I have a "distance" friend who has had recent cultures that grow a gram negative species and results have come back statig that it has been identified as belonging to the burkholderia cepacia complex family. After months of analyzing it and more cultures it has been determined to be a burkholderia contaminent and they have ruled out the more popular or well known species. So it is an unidentifiable contaminent. My friend has been stable and did a course of IV's when first identified. The bug is sensitive to many antibiotics. They use infection control procedures and since it is identified in the "family" they use extra precautions.

I guess my question is. What are some of the myths about burkholderia Cepacia Complex and what is evolving in this field? It seems that so many more people are being identified with some kind of species and I see so many people here who have had it for years. It is confusing for me. Is testing getting better? Are more strains being found? Do different strains cause different outcomes? It just seems like an area that is evolving and changing so much that it is hard to keep up with.

Skye
04-07-2010, 10:53 PM
I have a "distance" friend who has had recent cultures that grow a gram negative species and results have come back statig that it has been identified as belonging to the burkholderia cepacia complex family. After months of analyzing it and more cultures it has been determined to be a burkholderia contaminent and they have ruled out the more popular or well known species. So it is an unidentifiable contaminent. My friend has been stable and did a course of IV's when first identified. The bug is sensitive to many antibiotics. They use infection control procedures and since it is identified in the "family" they use extra precautions.

I guess my question is. What are some of the myths about burkholderia Cepacia Complex and what is evolving in this field? It seems that so many more people are being identified with some kind of species and I see so many people here who have had it for years. It is confusing for me. Is testing getting better? Are more strains being found? Do different strains cause different outcomes? It just seems like an area that is evolving and changing so much that it is hard to keep up with.

Skye
04-07-2010, 10:53 PM
I have a "distance" friend who has had recent cultures that grow a gram negative species and results have come back statig that it has been identified as belonging to the burkholderia cepacia complex family. After months of analyzing it and more cultures it has been determined to be a burkholderia contaminent and they have ruled out the more popular or well known species. So it is an unidentifiable contaminent. My friend has been stable and did a course of IV's when first identified. The bug is sensitive to many antibiotics. They use infection control procedures and since it is identified in the "family" they use extra precautions.

I guess my question is. What are some of the myths about burkholderia Cepacia Complex and what is evolving in this field? It seems that so many more people are being identified with some kind of species and I see so many people here who have had it for years. It is confusing for me. Is testing getting better? Are more strains being found? Do different strains cause different outcomes? It just seems like an area that is evolving and changing so much that it is hard to keep up with.

Skye
04-07-2010, 10:53 PM
I have a "distance" friend who has had recent cultures that grow a gram negative species and results have come back statig that it has been identified as belonging to the burkholderia cepacia complex family. After months of analyzing it and more cultures it has been determined to be a burkholderia contaminent and they have ruled out the more popular or well known species. So it is an unidentifiable contaminent. My friend has been stable and did a course of IV's when first identified. The bug is sensitive to many antibiotics. They use infection control procedures and since it is identified in the "family" they use extra precautions.
<br />
<br />I guess my question is. What are some of the myths about burkholderia Cepacia Complex and what is evolving in this field? It seems that so many more people are being identified with some kind of species and I see so many people here who have had it for years. It is confusing for me. Is testing getting better? Are more strains being found? Do different strains cause different outcomes? It just seems like an area that is evolving and changing so much that it is hard to keep up with.

moxie1
04-08-2010, 11:51 AM
Skye,

I don't have alot of answers to your questions, but I do know that certain strains are considered worse than others.

I have the cenocepacia which is most associated with "cepacia syndrome" (quick decline in health). However, I have had it for over 15 years and it has not affected my pfts.

My doctor has even said that the cepacia could be protecting me from other bugs.

Anyway, my guess as to why we are seeing it more and more would be due to cross-infection at sloppy hospitals.

moxie1
04-08-2010, 11:51 AM
Skye,

I don't have alot of answers to your questions, but I do know that certain strains are considered worse than others.

I have the cenocepacia which is most associated with "cepacia syndrome" (quick decline in health). However, I have had it for over 15 years and it has not affected my pfts.

My doctor has even said that the cepacia could be protecting me from other bugs.

Anyway, my guess as to why we are seeing it more and more would be due to cross-infection at sloppy hospitals.

moxie1
04-08-2010, 11:51 AM
Skye,

I don't have alot of answers to your questions, but I do know that certain strains are considered worse than others.

I have the cenocepacia which is most associated with "cepacia syndrome" (quick decline in health). However, I have had it for over 15 years and it has not affected my pfts.

My doctor has even said that the cepacia could be protecting me from other bugs.

Anyway, my guess as to why we are seeing it more and more would be due to cross-infection at sloppy hospitals.

moxie1
04-08-2010, 11:51 AM
Skye,

I don't have alot of answers to your questions, but I do know that certain strains are considered worse than others.

I have the cenocepacia which is most associated with "cepacia syndrome" (quick decline in health). However, I have had it for over 15 years and it has not affected my pfts.

My doctor has even said that the cepacia could be protecting me from other bugs.

Anyway, my guess as to why we are seeing it more and more would be due to cross-infection at sloppy hospitals.

moxie1
04-08-2010, 11:51 AM
Skye,
<br />
<br />I don't have alot of answers to your questions, but I do know that certain strains are considered worse than others.
<br />
<br />I have the cenocepacia which is most associated with "cepacia syndrome" (quick decline in health). However, I have had it for over 15 years and it has not affected my pfts.
<br />
<br />My doctor has even said that the cepacia could be protecting me from other bugs.
<br />
<br />Anyway, my guess as to why we are seeing it more and more would be due to cross-infection at sloppy hospitals.