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mom2lillian
10-31-2009, 02:15 AM
In a nutshell my church has alot of small growth groups that meet on a huge array of topics from groups as small as 3-4 to 100+ in a church of 1200ish. Talking with two other ladies one waiting for a liver, one with MS and myself we all thought it would be great to have a group for those coping with illnesses. Two of us are moving forward with it. We will meet probably once a month and I am looking into hosting a private online members only site for us since many of us will ahve limitations to our ability to meet.

"LOOKING UP" will be a + group where you can let it out but it wont be a pity party and it will include using our spirituality and believe in Jesus to help us through. That being said we plan to have getting to know you events, activities, perhaps later on speakers on varying topics to improve your health and maybe even some day a mini retreat.

I would LOVE LOVE LOVE ideas, anythign at all that would a cool article, game, ice breaker, speaker idea, project, get away, ANYTHING

thanks

mom2lillian
10-31-2009, 02:15 AM
In a nutshell my church has alot of small growth groups that meet on a huge array of topics from groups as small as 3-4 to 100+ in a church of 1200ish. Talking with two other ladies one waiting for a liver, one with MS and myself we all thought it would be great to have a group for those coping with illnesses. Two of us are moving forward with it. We will meet probably once a month and I am looking into hosting a private online members only site for us since many of us will ahve limitations to our ability to meet.

"LOOKING UP" will be a + group where you can let it out but it wont be a pity party and it will include using our spirituality and believe in Jesus to help us through. That being said we plan to have getting to know you events, activities, perhaps later on speakers on varying topics to improve your health and maybe even some day a mini retreat.

I would LOVE LOVE LOVE ideas, anythign at all that would a cool article, game, ice breaker, speaker idea, project, get away, ANYTHING

thanks

mom2lillian
10-31-2009, 02:15 AM
In a nutshell my church has alot of small growth groups that meet on a huge array of topics from groups as small as 3-4 to 100+ in a church of 1200ish. Talking with two other ladies one waiting for a liver, one with MS and myself we all thought it would be great to have a group for those coping with illnesses. Two of us are moving forward with it. We will meet probably once a month and I am looking into hosting a private online members only site for us since many of us will ahve limitations to our ability to meet.

"LOOKING UP" will be a + group where you can let it out but it wont be a pity party and it will include using our spirituality and believe in Jesus to help us through. That being said we plan to have getting to know you events, activities, perhaps later on speakers on varying topics to improve your health and maybe even some day a mini retreat.

I would LOVE LOVE LOVE ideas, anythign at all that would a cool article, game, ice breaker, speaker idea, project, get away, ANYTHING

thanks

mom2lillian
10-31-2009, 02:15 AM
In a nutshell my church has alot of small growth groups that meet on a huge array of topics from groups as small as 3-4 to 100+ in a church of 1200ish. Talking with two other ladies one waiting for a liver, one with MS and myself we all thought it would be great to have a group for those coping with illnesses. Two of us are moving forward with it. We will meet probably once a month and I am looking into hosting a private online members only site for us since many of us will ahve limitations to our ability to meet.

"LOOKING UP" will be a + group where you can let it out but it wont be a pity party and it will include using our spirituality and believe in Jesus to help us through. That being said we plan to have getting to know you events, activities, perhaps later on speakers on varying topics to improve your health and maybe even some day a mini retreat.

I would LOVE LOVE LOVE ideas, anythign at all that would a cool article, game, ice breaker, speaker idea, project, get away, ANYTHING

thanks

mom2lillian
10-31-2009, 02:15 AM
In a nutshell my church has alot of small growth groups that meet on a huge array of topics from groups as small as 3-4 to 100+ in a church of 1200ish. Talking with two other ladies one waiting for a liver, one with MS and myself we all thought it would be great to have a group for those coping with illnesses. Two of us are moving forward with it. We will meet probably once a month and I am looking into hosting a private online members only site for us since many of us will ahve limitations to our ability to meet.
<br />
<br />"LOOKING UP" will be a + group where you can let it out but it wont be a pity party and it will include using our spirituality and believe in Jesus to help us through. That being said we plan to have getting to know you events, activities, perhaps later on speakers on varying topics to improve your health and maybe even some day a mini retreat.
<br />
<br />I would LOVE LOVE LOVE ideas, anythign at all that would a cool article, game, ice breaker, speaker idea, project, get away, ANYTHING
<br />
<br />thanks

MicheleGazelle
10-31-2009, 01:35 PM
Maybe an introductory packet for a new members with a list of resources?

Maybe an exercise where in addition to venting about the bad stuff of your condition, you also talk about one good thing that has come out of it? Personal hardship is often a great source of personal and spiritual growth. This seems like the ideal place to focus on that part of it.

Good luck with this. It sounds like a great idea.

MicheleGazelle
10-31-2009, 01:35 PM
Maybe an introductory packet for a new members with a list of resources?

Maybe an exercise where in addition to venting about the bad stuff of your condition, you also talk about one good thing that has come out of it? Personal hardship is often a great source of personal and spiritual growth. This seems like the ideal place to focus on that part of it.

Good luck with this. It sounds like a great idea.

MicheleGazelle
10-31-2009, 01:35 PM
Maybe an introductory packet for a new members with a list of resources?

Maybe an exercise where in addition to venting about the bad stuff of your condition, you also talk about one good thing that has come out of it? Personal hardship is often a great source of personal and spiritual growth. This seems like the ideal place to focus on that part of it.

Good luck with this. It sounds like a great idea.

MicheleGazelle
10-31-2009, 01:35 PM
Maybe an introductory packet for a new members with a list of resources?

Maybe an exercise where in addition to venting about the bad stuff of your condition, you also talk about one good thing that has come out of it? Personal hardship is often a great source of personal and spiritual growth. This seems like the ideal place to focus on that part of it.

Good luck with this. It sounds like a great idea.

MicheleGazelle
10-31-2009, 01:35 PM
Maybe an introductory packet for a new members with a list of resources?
<br />
<br />Maybe an exercise where in addition to venting about the bad stuff of your condition, you also talk about one good thing that has come out of it? Personal hardship is often a great source of personal and spiritual growth. This seems like the ideal place to focus on that part of it.
<br />
<br />Good luck with this. It sounds like a great idea.

Melissa75
10-31-2009, 01:49 PM
Doing a final project for grad social work class right now, part of it focuses on spiritual & psychological growth among women with HIV. The study is by Heather Dunbar, published in 1998 issue of "Social Work" (a journal).

Here is the info from my powerpoint slides. You could use it as a discussion starting point. I can email you a pdf of the actual slides if you want. There are some parts which are not relevant, but most could be useful.

Women with HIV were studied and found to have some surprisingly positive life transformations and personal growth stemming from their diagnosis.
Focusing only on the negative consequences of illness and disease may inadvertently minimize the strengths of clients.
34 women between 26 and 53 years of age.
Many had history of severe substance abuse and work in the sex industry.
82% reported having been physically or sexually assualted.
Diverse ethnic backgrounds (state of Hawaii).

From in-depth interviews (500 pgs single-spaced transcribed), the following positive and transformative themes emerged:
Reckoning with death: shock, denial, followed by grieving and reckoning/acceptance.
Life affirmation: commit to life redefined, see death is a part of life, see beauty in previously unnoticed things, live consciously.
Creation of meaning: see new purpose, examine and work though past issues, find meaning for the pain/hardship.
Self-affirmation: gain more positive sense of self through care of self and recognition of physical limitations.
Redefining relationships: resolving, changing or ending relationships. Becoming more honest and discriminating in choosing relationships with others - family and friends.

Factors facilitating the positive transformations:
Accurate information on HIV in the community and non-judgmental responses from others.
Self-determination - the women choosing to let go of the pain and live on.
Passage of time - the effort to grow and accept death was initially tremendous and had detours, but became easier.

Implications for social work practice:
Anticipate, recognize and encourage growth without denying the pain of the condition or jumping too early into the topic.
Assist clients with death and dying issues.
Identify and facilitate life affirmation, assist in developing strategies.
Recognize the importance of spiritual well-being and the creation of meaning.
Encourage self-evaluation, self-affirmation, and self-care.
Facilitate relationship resolution and the development of new relationships.
Keep biases in check (clinician should work through personal issues of blame or negative judgment).

Melissa75
10-31-2009, 01:49 PM
Doing a final project for grad social work class right now, part of it focuses on spiritual & psychological growth among women with HIV. The study is by Heather Dunbar, published in 1998 issue of "Social Work" (a journal).

Here is the info from my powerpoint slides. You could use it as a discussion starting point. I can email you a pdf of the actual slides if you want. There are some parts which are not relevant, but most could be useful.

Women with HIV were studied and found to have some surprisingly positive life transformations and personal growth stemming from their diagnosis.
Focusing only on the negative consequences of illness and disease may inadvertently minimize the strengths of clients.
34 women between 26 and 53 years of age.
Many had history of severe substance abuse and work in the sex industry.
82% reported having been physically or sexually assualted.
Diverse ethnic backgrounds (state of Hawaii).

From in-depth interviews (500 pgs single-spaced transcribed), the following positive and transformative themes emerged:
Reckoning with death: shock, denial, followed by grieving and reckoning/acceptance.
Life affirmation: commit to life redefined, see death is a part of life, see beauty in previously unnoticed things, live consciously.
Creation of meaning: see new purpose, examine and work though past issues, find meaning for the pain/hardship.
Self-affirmation: gain more positive sense of self through care of self and recognition of physical limitations.
Redefining relationships: resolving, changing or ending relationships. Becoming more honest and discriminating in choosing relationships with others - family and friends.

Factors facilitating the positive transformations:
Accurate information on HIV in the community and non-judgmental responses from others.
Self-determination - the women choosing to let go of the pain and live on.
Passage of time - the effort to grow and accept death was initially tremendous and had detours, but became easier.

Implications for social work practice:
Anticipate, recognize and encourage growth without denying the pain of the condition or jumping too early into the topic.
Assist clients with death and dying issues.
Identify and facilitate life affirmation, assist in developing strategies.
Recognize the importance of spiritual well-being and the creation of meaning.
Encourage self-evaluation, self-affirmation, and self-care.
Facilitate relationship resolution and the development of new relationships.
Keep biases in check (clinician should work through personal issues of blame or negative judgment).

Melissa75
10-31-2009, 01:49 PM
Doing a final project for grad social work class right now, part of it focuses on spiritual & psychological growth among women with HIV. The study is by Heather Dunbar, published in 1998 issue of "Social Work" (a journal).

Here is the info from my powerpoint slides. You could use it as a discussion starting point. I can email you a pdf of the actual slides if you want. There are some parts which are not relevant, but most could be useful.

Women with HIV were studied and found to have some surprisingly positive life transformations and personal growth stemming from their diagnosis.
Focusing only on the negative consequences of illness and disease may inadvertently minimize the strengths of clients.
34 women between 26 and 53 years of age.
Many had history of severe substance abuse and work in the sex industry.
82% reported having been physically or sexually assualted.
Diverse ethnic backgrounds (state of Hawaii).

From in-depth interviews (500 pgs single-spaced transcribed), the following positive and transformative themes emerged:
Reckoning with death: shock, denial, followed by grieving and reckoning/acceptance.
Life affirmation: commit to life redefined, see death is a part of life, see beauty in previously unnoticed things, live consciously.
Creation of meaning: see new purpose, examine and work though past issues, find meaning for the pain/hardship.
Self-affirmation: gain more positive sense of self through care of self and recognition of physical limitations.
Redefining relationships: resolving, changing or ending relationships. Becoming more honest and discriminating in choosing relationships with others - family and friends.

Factors facilitating the positive transformations:
Accurate information on HIV in the community and non-judgmental responses from others.
Self-determination - the women choosing to let go of the pain and live on.
Passage of time - the effort to grow and accept death was initially tremendous and had detours, but became easier.

Implications for social work practice:
Anticipate, recognize and encourage growth without denying the pain of the condition or jumping too early into the topic.
Assist clients with death and dying issues.
Identify and facilitate life affirmation, assist in developing strategies.
Recognize the importance of spiritual well-being and the creation of meaning.
Encourage self-evaluation, self-affirmation, and self-care.
Facilitate relationship resolution and the development of new relationships.
Keep biases in check (clinician should work through personal issues of blame or negative judgment).

Melissa75
10-31-2009, 01:49 PM
Doing a final project for grad social work class right now, part of it focuses on spiritual & psychological growth among women with HIV. The study is by Heather Dunbar, published in 1998 issue of "Social Work" (a journal).

Here is the info from my powerpoint slides. You could use it as a discussion starting point. I can email you a pdf of the actual slides if you want. There are some parts which are not relevant, but most could be useful.

Women with HIV were studied and found to have some surprisingly positive life transformations and personal growth stemming from their diagnosis.
Focusing only on the negative consequences of illness and disease may inadvertently minimize the strengths of clients.
34 women between 26 and 53 years of age.
Many had history of severe substance abuse and work in the sex industry.
82% reported having been physically or sexually assualted.
Diverse ethnic backgrounds (state of Hawaii).

From in-depth interviews (500 pgs single-spaced transcribed), the following positive and transformative themes emerged:
Reckoning with death: shock, denial, followed by grieving and reckoning/acceptance.
Life affirmation: commit to life redefined, see death is a part of life, see beauty in previously unnoticed things, live consciously.
Creation of meaning: see new purpose, examine and work though past issues, find meaning for the pain/hardship.
Self-affirmation: gain more positive sense of self through care of self and recognition of physical limitations.
Redefining relationships: resolving, changing or ending relationships. Becoming more honest and discriminating in choosing relationships with others - family and friends.

Factors facilitating the positive transformations:
Accurate information on HIV in the community and non-judgmental responses from others.
Self-determination - the women choosing to let go of the pain and live on.
Passage of time - the effort to grow and accept death was initially tremendous and had detours, but became easier.

Implications for social work practice:
Anticipate, recognize and encourage growth without denying the pain of the condition or jumping too early into the topic.
Assist clients with death and dying issues.
Identify and facilitate life affirmation, assist in developing strategies.
Recognize the importance of spiritual well-being and the creation of meaning.
Encourage self-evaluation, self-affirmation, and self-care.
Facilitate relationship resolution and the development of new relationships.
Keep biases in check (clinician should work through personal issues of blame or negative judgment).

Melissa75
10-31-2009, 01:49 PM
Doing a final project for grad social work class right now, part of it focuses on spiritual & psychological growth among women with HIV. The study is by Heather Dunbar, published in 1998 issue of "Social Work" (a journal).
<br />
<br />Here is the info from my powerpoint slides. You could use it as a discussion starting point. I can email you a pdf of the actual slides if you want. There are some parts which are not relevant, but most could be useful.
<br />
<br />Women with HIV were studied and found to have some surprisingly positive life transformations and personal growth stemming from their diagnosis.
<br />Focusing only on the negative consequences of illness and disease may inadvertently minimize the strengths of clients.
<br />34 women between 26 and 53 years of age.
<br />Many had history of severe substance abuse and work in the sex industry.
<br />82% reported having been physically or sexually assualted.
<br />Diverse ethnic backgrounds (state of Hawaii).
<br />
<br />From in-depth interviews (500 pgs single-spaced transcribed), the following positive and transformative themes emerged:
<br />Reckoning with death: shock, denial, followed by grieving and reckoning/acceptance.
<br />Life affirmation: commit to life redefined, see death is a part of life, see beauty in previously unnoticed things, live consciously.
<br />Creation of meaning: see new purpose, examine and work though past issues, find meaning for the pain/hardship.
<br />Self-affirmation: gain more positive sense of self through care of self and recognition of physical limitations.
<br />Redefining relationships: resolving, changing or ending relationships. Becoming more honest and discriminating in choosing relationships with others - family and friends.
<br />
<br />Factors facilitating the positive transformations:
<br />Accurate information on HIV in the community and non-judgmental responses from others.
<br />Self-determination - the women choosing to let go of the pain and live on.
<br />Passage of time - the effort to grow and accept death was initially tremendous and had detours, but became easier.
<br />
<br />Implications for social work practice:
<br />Anticipate, recognize and encourage growth without denying the pain of the condition or jumping too early into the topic.
<br />Assist clients with death and dying issues.
<br />Identify and facilitate life affirmation, assist in developing strategies.
<br />Recognize the importance of spiritual well-being and the creation of meaning.
<br />Encourage self-evaluation, self-affirmation, and self-care.
<br />Facilitate relationship resolution and the development of new relationships.
<br />Keep biases in check (clinician should work through personal issues of blame or negative judgment).