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rnjessica
03-31-2009, 06:12 PM
Do any of you use FEV1 meters at home? This is something I just heard of and am interested in getting one. Here are my questions...

1. Do you have one/like it?
2. Is it easy to use/results interpreted easily?
3. What kind/brand?
3. Do you ever take it to the doc with you since they just usually go off of one value at my clinic visit which is every 3 months.

Any input is greatly appreciated!

rnjessica
03-31-2009, 06:12 PM
Do any of you use FEV1 meters at home? This is something I just heard of and am interested in getting one. Here are my questions...

1. Do you have one/like it?
2. Is it easy to use/results interpreted easily?
3. What kind/brand?
3. Do you ever take it to the doc with you since they just usually go off of one value at my clinic visit which is every 3 months.

Any input is greatly appreciated!

rnjessica
03-31-2009, 06:12 PM
Do any of you use FEV1 meters at home? This is something I just heard of and am interested in getting one. Here are my questions...

1. Do you have one/like it?
2. Is it easy to use/results interpreted easily?
3. What kind/brand?
3. Do you ever take it to the doc with you since they just usually go off of one value at my clinic visit which is every 3 months.

Any input is greatly appreciated!

rnjessica
03-31-2009, 06:12 PM
Do any of you use FEV1 meters at home? This is something I just heard of and am interested in getting one. Here are my questions...

1. Do you have one/like it?
2. Is it easy to use/results interpreted easily?
3. What kind/brand?
3. Do you ever take it to the doc with you since they just usually go off of one value at my clinic visit which is every 3 months.

Any input is greatly appreciated!

rnjessica
03-31-2009, 06:12 PM
Do any of you use FEV1 meters at home? This is something I just heard of and am interested in getting one. Here are my questions...
<br />
<br />1. Do you have one/like it?
<br />2. Is it easy to use/results interpreted easily?
<br />3. What kind/brand?
<br />3. Do you ever take it to the doc with you since they just usually go off of one value at my clinic visit which is every 3 months.
<br />
<br />Any input is greatly appreciated!

Nightwriter
03-31-2009, 06:48 PM
Hi Jess,

I just use a peak flow meter -- which only measures the large airways. Even though it isn't the more sophisticated FEV1 meter which I assume you mean is the kind some doctors's offices have, it has helped me a lot.

My doctor gave me the peak flow meter when I first started going to her. I had to measure my peak flow a few times a day, and was shocked at how much it varied because I couldn't always tell that it was so low. Soon, I was able to establish what was my normal and if it fell below a certain number, I had to take extra treatments with a bronchodilator. I started to see patterns too. My doctor saw me once every month and used my chart of my peak flow to try to find the right medications and lifestyle changes to try to get my FEV1 up.

There were times that it was scary low and I had to receive either a cortisone shot (my numbers could go up at least 100 points) or even get an IVP treatment in the doctor's office.

As my asthma became better controlled, my FEV1 started to rise, and I was about to resume more vigorous exercise, I had to hit a certain number before I was allowed to excercise (after using a bronchodilator).

Nowadays, I use my peak flow meter if I'm short of breath or sick, as an indication of how bad off I am. Sometimes, I am surprised by the number, because it doesn't always match the way that I feel. If the number is high and I feel short of breath, I have learned that the small airways may be contricted. I do extra treatments as prescribed and I'm a little more careful about being exposed to bad air. I think knowing your peak flow or FEV1 is important tool.

I see my doctor once a month and have my peak flow checked every time -- and if it stops dropping she changes my medication or something else in my routine.

Nightwriter
03-31-2009, 06:48 PM
Hi Jess,

I just use a peak flow meter -- which only measures the large airways. Even though it isn't the more sophisticated FEV1 meter which I assume you mean is the kind some doctors's offices have, it has helped me a lot.

My doctor gave me the peak flow meter when I first started going to her. I had to measure my peak flow a few times a day, and was shocked at how much it varied because I couldn't always tell that it was so low. Soon, I was able to establish what was my normal and if it fell below a certain number, I had to take extra treatments with a bronchodilator. I started to see patterns too. My doctor saw me once every month and used my chart of my peak flow to try to find the right medications and lifestyle changes to try to get my FEV1 up.

There were times that it was scary low and I had to receive either a cortisone shot (my numbers could go up at least 100 points) or even get an IVP treatment in the doctor's office.

As my asthma became better controlled, my FEV1 started to rise, and I was about to resume more vigorous exercise, I had to hit a certain number before I was allowed to excercise (after using a bronchodilator).

Nowadays, I use my peak flow meter if I'm short of breath or sick, as an indication of how bad off I am. Sometimes, I am surprised by the number, because it doesn't always match the way that I feel. If the number is high and I feel short of breath, I have learned that the small airways may be contricted. I do extra treatments as prescribed and I'm a little more careful about being exposed to bad air. I think knowing your peak flow or FEV1 is important tool.

I see my doctor once a month and have my peak flow checked every time -- and if it stops dropping she changes my medication or something else in my routine.

Nightwriter
03-31-2009, 06:48 PM
Hi Jess,

I just use a peak flow meter -- which only measures the large airways. Even though it isn't the more sophisticated FEV1 meter which I assume you mean is the kind some doctors's offices have, it has helped me a lot.

My doctor gave me the peak flow meter when I first started going to her. I had to measure my peak flow a few times a day, and was shocked at how much it varied because I couldn't always tell that it was so low. Soon, I was able to establish what was my normal and if it fell below a certain number, I had to take extra treatments with a bronchodilator. I started to see patterns too. My doctor saw me once every month and used my chart of my peak flow to try to find the right medications and lifestyle changes to try to get my FEV1 up.

There were times that it was scary low and I had to receive either a cortisone shot (my numbers could go up at least 100 points) or even get an IVP treatment in the doctor's office.

As my asthma became better controlled, my FEV1 started to rise, and I was about to resume more vigorous exercise, I had to hit a certain number before I was allowed to excercise (after using a bronchodilator).

Nowadays, I use my peak flow meter if I'm short of breath or sick, as an indication of how bad off I am. Sometimes, I am surprised by the number, because it doesn't always match the way that I feel. If the number is high and I feel short of breath, I have learned that the small airways may be contricted. I do extra treatments as prescribed and I'm a little more careful about being exposed to bad air. I think knowing your peak flow or FEV1 is important tool.

I see my doctor once a month and have my peak flow checked every time -- and if it stops dropping she changes my medication or something else in my routine.

Nightwriter
03-31-2009, 06:48 PM
Hi Jess,

I just use a peak flow meter -- which only measures the large airways. Even though it isn't the more sophisticated FEV1 meter which I assume you mean is the kind some doctors's offices have, it has helped me a lot.

My doctor gave me the peak flow meter when I first started going to her. I had to measure my peak flow a few times a day, and was shocked at how much it varied because I couldn't always tell that it was so low. Soon, I was able to establish what was my normal and if it fell below a certain number, I had to take extra treatments with a bronchodilator. I started to see patterns too. My doctor saw me once every month and used my chart of my peak flow to try to find the right medications and lifestyle changes to try to get my FEV1 up.

There were times that it was scary low and I had to receive either a cortisone shot (my numbers could go up at least 100 points) or even get an IVP treatment in the doctor's office.

As my asthma became better controlled, my FEV1 started to rise, and I was about to resume more vigorous exercise, I had to hit a certain number before I was allowed to excercise (after using a bronchodilator).

Nowadays, I use my peak flow meter if I'm short of breath or sick, as an indication of how bad off I am. Sometimes, I am surprised by the number, because it doesn't always match the way that I feel. If the number is high and I feel short of breath, I have learned that the small airways may be contricted. I do extra treatments as prescribed and I'm a little more careful about being exposed to bad air. I think knowing your peak flow or FEV1 is important tool.

I see my doctor once a month and have my peak flow checked every time -- and if it stops dropping she changes my medication or something else in my routine.

Nightwriter
03-31-2009, 06:48 PM
Hi Jess,
<br />
<br />I just use a peak flow meter -- which only measures the large airways. Even though it isn't the more sophisticated FEV1 meter which I assume you mean is the kind some doctors's offices have, it has helped me a lot.
<br />
<br />My doctor gave me the peak flow meter when I first started going to her. I had to measure my peak flow a few times a day, and was shocked at how much it varied because I couldn't always tell that it was so low. Soon, I was able to establish what was my normal and if it fell below a certain number, I had to take extra treatments with a bronchodilator. I started to see patterns too. My doctor saw me once every month and used my chart of my peak flow to try to find the right medications and lifestyle changes to try to get my FEV1 up.
<br />
<br />There were times that it was scary low and I had to receive either a cortisone shot (my numbers could go up at least 100 points) or even get an IVP treatment in the doctor's office.
<br />
<br />As my asthma became better controlled, my FEV1 started to rise, and I was about to resume more vigorous exercise, I had to hit a certain number before I was allowed to excercise (after using a bronchodilator).
<br />
<br />Nowadays, I use my peak flow meter if I'm short of breath or sick, as an indication of how bad off I am. Sometimes, I am surprised by the number, because it doesn't always match the way that I feel. If the number is high and I feel short of breath, I have learned that the small airways may be contricted. I do extra treatments as prescribed and I'm a little more careful about being exposed to bad air. I think knowing your peak flow or FEV1 is important tool.
<br />
<br />I see my doctor once a month and have my peak flow checked every time -- and if it stops dropping she changes my medication or something else in my routine.

rnjessica
03-31-2009, 10:10 PM
Thank you for all the great info you gave me! <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0"> I'm going to call the docs tomorrow and see if they have them to give to patients. Otherwise I'm buying one ASAP! Thanks for the encouragement!

rnjessica
03-31-2009, 10:10 PM
Thank you for all the great info you gave me! <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0"> I'm going to call the docs tomorrow and see if they have them to give to patients. Otherwise I'm buying one ASAP! Thanks for the encouragement!

rnjessica
03-31-2009, 10:10 PM
Thank you for all the great info you gave me! <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0"> I'm going to call the docs tomorrow and see if they have them to give to patients. Otherwise I'm buying one ASAP! Thanks for the encouragement!

rnjessica
03-31-2009, 10:10 PM
Thank you for all the great info you gave me! <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0"> I'm going to call the docs tomorrow and see if they have them to give to patients. Otherwise I'm buying one ASAP! Thanks for the encouragement!

rnjessica
03-31-2009, 10:10 PM
Thank you for all the great info you gave me! <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0"> I'm going to call the docs tomorrow and see if they have them to give to patients. Otherwise I'm buying one ASAP! Thanks for the encouragement!

debs2girls
04-01-2009, 01:19 AM
Jess, we have one like Nightwriter spoke of. I asked the P.A. we HAD to see a while back about Chey's reading on it...she said "you cant judge a c/fer's pft's with those things" Okay, then why did the rt give it to us in the hospital (per docs orders) and instruct me when to call the doc or head to the ER?

debs2girls
04-01-2009, 01:19 AM
Jess, we have one like Nightwriter spoke of. I asked the P.A. we HAD to see a while back about Chey's reading on it...she said "you cant judge a c/fer's pft's with those things" Okay, then why did the rt give it to us in the hospital (per docs orders) and instruct me when to call the doc or head to the ER?

debs2girls
04-01-2009, 01:19 AM
Jess, we have one like Nightwriter spoke of. I asked the P.A. we HAD to see a while back about Chey's reading on it...she said "you cant judge a c/fer's pft's with those things" Okay, then why did the rt give it to us in the hospital (per docs orders) and instruct me when to call the doc or head to the ER?

debs2girls
04-01-2009, 01:19 AM
Jess, we have one like Nightwriter spoke of. I asked the P.A. we HAD to see a while back about Chey's reading on it...she said "you cant judge a c/fer's pft's with those things" Okay, then why did the rt give it to us in the hospital (per docs orders) and instruct me when to call the doc or head to the ER?

debs2girls
04-01-2009, 01:19 AM
Jess, we have one like Nightwriter spoke of. I asked the P.A. we HAD to see a while back about Chey's reading on it...she said "you cant judge a c/fer's pft's with those things" Okay, then why did the rt give it to us in the hospital (per docs orders) and instruct me when to call the doc or head to the ER?

Nightwriter
04-01-2009, 03:52 AM
I think one of the maddening things about this disease is there is no consistancy between anybody regarding diagnosis, treatment, medications, supplements, lifestyle recommendations (if any). Just reading people's posts, it is shocking at how the same exact symptoms are treated or even not treated between people.

This cheap little peak flow meter has helped me. And I can't see how it can hurt anybody. In my book, any information is better than no information. I have heard that if you ask, some clinics will give you one. If not, you can get one on-line for about $18.00 Of course, it would be nice if a doctor can guide you how to use it.

I can you an example of how I used it. There are two markers on the meter that you set showing a range that is supposed to be your normal (it might be your low normal and high normal) I think mine were between 350 and 400 or 450. When I started using it, it was in the low 300s, too low. I remember it dipping below 300 and I had to get a cortisone shot and I remember using that IVP machine. This only happened a couple of times before the meds started working and I was able to clean up my environment, etc... I was only allowed to do vigorous exercise if it were above 400. (I had to take 2 puffs before exercise). After a while, my peak flow started hitting 400 regularly and even now my range is between 400 and 450. So now, when I dip below 400, I start paying attention. Every machine is different. On my doctor's peak flow meter, all my numbers are higher.

I think it would be good if you can find a doctor who can determine the right numbers in your individual cases. But at any rate, charting peak flow a few times a day at the same time every day, can be very useful.

Nightwriter
04-01-2009, 03:52 AM
I think one of the maddening things about this disease is there is no consistancy between anybody regarding diagnosis, treatment, medications, supplements, lifestyle recommendations (if any). Just reading people's posts, it is shocking at how the same exact symptoms are treated or even not treated between people.

This cheap little peak flow meter has helped me. And I can't see how it can hurt anybody. In my book, any information is better than no information. I have heard that if you ask, some clinics will give you one. If not, you can get one on-line for about $18.00 Of course, it would be nice if a doctor can guide you how to use it.

I can you an example of how I used it. There are two markers on the meter that you set showing a range that is supposed to be your normal (it might be your low normal and high normal) I think mine were between 350 and 400 or 450. When I started using it, it was in the low 300s, too low. I remember it dipping below 300 and I had to get a cortisone shot and I remember using that IVP machine. This only happened a couple of times before the meds started working and I was able to clean up my environment, etc... I was only allowed to do vigorous exercise if it were above 400. (I had to take 2 puffs before exercise). After a while, my peak flow started hitting 400 regularly and even now my range is between 400 and 450. So now, when I dip below 400, I start paying attention. Every machine is different. On my doctor's peak flow meter, all my numbers are higher.

I think it would be good if you can find a doctor who can determine the right numbers in your individual cases. But at any rate, charting peak flow a few times a day at the same time every day, can be very useful.

Nightwriter
04-01-2009, 03:52 AM
I think one of the maddening things about this disease is there is no consistancy between anybody regarding diagnosis, treatment, medications, supplements, lifestyle recommendations (if any). Just reading people's posts, it is shocking at how the same exact symptoms are treated or even not treated between people.

This cheap little peak flow meter has helped me. And I can't see how it can hurt anybody. In my book, any information is better than no information. I have heard that if you ask, some clinics will give you one. If not, you can get one on-line for about $18.00 Of course, it would be nice if a doctor can guide you how to use it.

I can you an example of how I used it. There are two markers on the meter that you set showing a range that is supposed to be your normal (it might be your low normal and high normal) I think mine were between 350 and 400 or 450. When I started using it, it was in the low 300s, too low. I remember it dipping below 300 and I had to get a cortisone shot and I remember using that IVP machine. This only happened a couple of times before the meds started working and I was able to clean up my environment, etc... I was only allowed to do vigorous exercise if it were above 400. (I had to take 2 puffs before exercise). After a while, my peak flow started hitting 400 regularly and even now my range is between 400 and 450. So now, when I dip below 400, I start paying attention. Every machine is different. On my doctor's peak flow meter, all my numbers are higher.

I think it would be good if you can find a doctor who can determine the right numbers in your individual cases. But at any rate, charting peak flow a few times a day at the same time every day, can be very useful.

Nightwriter
04-01-2009, 03:52 AM
I think one of the maddening things about this disease is there is no consistancy between anybody regarding diagnosis, treatment, medications, supplements, lifestyle recommendations (if any). Just reading people's posts, it is shocking at how the same exact symptoms are treated or even not treated between people.

This cheap little peak flow meter has helped me. And I can't see how it can hurt anybody. In my book, any information is better than no information. I have heard that if you ask, some clinics will give you one. If not, you can get one on-line for about $18.00 Of course, it would be nice if a doctor can guide you how to use it.

I can you an example of how I used it. There are two markers on the meter that you set showing a range that is supposed to be your normal (it might be your low normal and high normal) I think mine were between 350 and 400 or 450. When I started using it, it was in the low 300s, too low. I remember it dipping below 300 and I had to get a cortisone shot and I remember using that IVP machine. This only happened a couple of times before the meds started working and I was able to clean up my environment, etc... I was only allowed to do vigorous exercise if it were above 400. (I had to take 2 puffs before exercise). After a while, my peak flow started hitting 400 regularly and even now my range is between 400 and 450. So now, when I dip below 400, I start paying attention. Every machine is different. On my doctor's peak flow meter, all my numbers are higher.

I think it would be good if you can find a doctor who can determine the right numbers in your individual cases. But at any rate, charting peak flow a few times a day at the same time every day, can be very useful.

Nightwriter
04-01-2009, 03:52 AM
<br />I think one of the maddening things about this disease is there is no consistancy between anybody regarding diagnosis, treatment, medications, supplements, lifestyle recommendations (if any). Just reading people's posts, it is shocking at how the same exact symptoms are treated or even not treated between people.
<br />
<br />This cheap little peak flow meter has helped me. And I can't see how it can hurt anybody. In my book, any information is better than no information. I have heard that if you ask, some clinics will give you one. If not, you can get one on-line for about $18.00 Of course, it would be nice if a doctor can guide you how to use it.
<br />
<br />I can you an example of how I used it. There are two markers on the meter that you set showing a range that is supposed to be your normal (it might be your low normal and high normal) I think mine were between 350 and 400 or 450. When I started using it, it was in the low 300s, too low. I remember it dipping below 300 and I had to get a cortisone shot and I remember using that IVP machine. This only happened a couple of times before the meds started working and I was able to clean up my environment, etc... I was only allowed to do vigorous exercise if it were above 400. (I had to take 2 puffs before exercise). After a while, my peak flow started hitting 400 regularly and even now my range is between 400 and 450. So now, when I dip below 400, I start paying attention. Every machine is different. On my doctor's peak flow meter, all my numbers are higher.
<br />
<br />I think it would be good if you can find a doctor who can determine the right numbers in your individual cases. But at any rate, charting peak flow a few times a day at the same time every day, can be very useful.
<br />