PDA

View Full Version : Understanding CFRD



65rosessamurai
03-23-2009, 01:01 AM
Since last Thursday, I've still been feeling a constant hunger and shaky hands not long after I've eaten.

Last Thursday, just a half hour before lunch at work, it felt like my sugar level dropped severely as I immediately grabbed a banana (My wife gives me a banana on a daily basis) and a few other foods I found in my desk to pick myself up with before lunch time.

With my jeans feeling loose for the past few days and being able to tighten my belt an extra notch, I thought I was loosing weight...only to find that I've gained it when I checked the next morning.

I haven't gone to see the doc, since I don't even know how to explain in enough detail as to what I'm dealing with. Besides, I was hoping to educate myself a little more about CFRD and Diabetes before going to an "unexperienced" doc in the CF field.

I did some minor searching on CFRD, to find that it is a cross between the typical "Type 1" and "Type 2". I think my relatives on my mom's side might have Type 1, since they take insulin. The MIL also was diabetic, perhaps a Type 2, but since her diet had been controlled, her weight went down, and her diabetes meds had changed. She only took pills, so I'm guessing with the Type 2, the pills helped the body to use the insulin she's producing.

I found two sources, one was from the University of Wisconsin, I think the other one was related to the CF foundation. I saw in one of the sources that the anti-inflammation medications used for the lungs is related to CFRD, along with other CF related issues.

They suggested screening for CF patients from the age of 12 to be done annually. I've gone over that age but hadn't started taking any anti-inflamation meds (NAC) until about two years ago.

So, I'm still not feeling all that well, and have been getting low blood sugar episodes quite frequently the past few days.

I'm wondering if there are any particular signs to notice that would highly suggest CFRD, outside of being rushed to the Emergency Room?

I don't wanna risk having to go by Ambulance to the Emergency Room in this country...they may end up driving me around town for a few hours before a hospital would finally take me...but by then it would be too late <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-sad.gif" border="0">

65rosessamurai
03-23-2009, 01:01 AM
Since last Thursday, I've still been feeling a constant hunger and shaky hands not long after I've eaten.

Last Thursday, just a half hour before lunch at work, it felt like my sugar level dropped severely as I immediately grabbed a banana (My wife gives me a banana on a daily basis) and a few other foods I found in my desk to pick myself up with before lunch time.

With my jeans feeling loose for the past few days and being able to tighten my belt an extra notch, I thought I was loosing weight...only to find that I've gained it when I checked the next morning.

I haven't gone to see the doc, since I don't even know how to explain in enough detail as to what I'm dealing with. Besides, I was hoping to educate myself a little more about CFRD and Diabetes before going to an "unexperienced" doc in the CF field.

I did some minor searching on CFRD, to find that it is a cross between the typical "Type 1" and "Type 2". I think my relatives on my mom's side might have Type 1, since they take insulin. The MIL also was diabetic, perhaps a Type 2, but since her diet had been controlled, her weight went down, and her diabetes meds had changed. She only took pills, so I'm guessing with the Type 2, the pills helped the body to use the insulin she's producing.

I found two sources, one was from the University of Wisconsin, I think the other one was related to the CF foundation. I saw in one of the sources that the anti-inflammation medications used for the lungs is related to CFRD, along with other CF related issues.

They suggested screening for CF patients from the age of 12 to be done annually. I've gone over that age but hadn't started taking any anti-inflamation meds (NAC) until about two years ago.

So, I'm still not feeling all that well, and have been getting low blood sugar episodes quite frequently the past few days.

I'm wondering if there are any particular signs to notice that would highly suggest CFRD, outside of being rushed to the Emergency Room?

I don't wanna risk having to go by Ambulance to the Emergency Room in this country...they may end up driving me around town for a few hours before a hospital would finally take me...but by then it would be too late <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-sad.gif" border="0">

65rosessamurai
03-23-2009, 01:01 AM
Since last Thursday, I've still been feeling a constant hunger and shaky hands not long after I've eaten.

Last Thursday, just a half hour before lunch at work, it felt like my sugar level dropped severely as I immediately grabbed a banana (My wife gives me a banana on a daily basis) and a few other foods I found in my desk to pick myself up with before lunch time.

With my jeans feeling loose for the past few days and being able to tighten my belt an extra notch, I thought I was loosing weight...only to find that I've gained it when I checked the next morning.

I haven't gone to see the doc, since I don't even know how to explain in enough detail as to what I'm dealing with. Besides, I was hoping to educate myself a little more about CFRD and Diabetes before going to an "unexperienced" doc in the CF field.

I did some minor searching on CFRD, to find that it is a cross between the typical "Type 1" and "Type 2". I think my relatives on my mom's side might have Type 1, since they take insulin. The MIL also was diabetic, perhaps a Type 2, but since her diet had been controlled, her weight went down, and her diabetes meds had changed. She only took pills, so I'm guessing with the Type 2, the pills helped the body to use the insulin she's producing.

I found two sources, one was from the University of Wisconsin, I think the other one was related to the CF foundation. I saw in one of the sources that the anti-inflammation medications used for the lungs is related to CFRD, along with other CF related issues.

They suggested screening for CF patients from the age of 12 to be done annually. I've gone over that age but hadn't started taking any anti-inflamation meds (NAC) until about two years ago.

So, I'm still not feeling all that well, and have been getting low blood sugar episodes quite frequently the past few days.

I'm wondering if there are any particular signs to notice that would highly suggest CFRD, outside of being rushed to the Emergency Room?

I don't wanna risk having to go by Ambulance to the Emergency Room in this country...they may end up driving me around town for a few hours before a hospital would finally take me...but by then it would be too late <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-sad.gif" border="0">

65rosessamurai
03-23-2009, 01:01 AM
Since last Thursday, I've still been feeling a constant hunger and shaky hands not long after I've eaten.

Last Thursday, just a half hour before lunch at work, it felt like my sugar level dropped severely as I immediately grabbed a banana (My wife gives me a banana on a daily basis) and a few other foods I found in my desk to pick myself up with before lunch time.

With my jeans feeling loose for the past few days and being able to tighten my belt an extra notch, I thought I was loosing weight...only to find that I've gained it when I checked the next morning.

I haven't gone to see the doc, since I don't even know how to explain in enough detail as to what I'm dealing with. Besides, I was hoping to educate myself a little more about CFRD and Diabetes before going to an "unexperienced" doc in the CF field.

I did some minor searching on CFRD, to find that it is a cross between the typical "Type 1" and "Type 2". I think my relatives on my mom's side might have Type 1, since they take insulin. The MIL also was diabetic, perhaps a Type 2, but since her diet had been controlled, her weight went down, and her diabetes meds had changed. She only took pills, so I'm guessing with the Type 2, the pills helped the body to use the insulin she's producing.

I found two sources, one was from the University of Wisconsin, I think the other one was related to the CF foundation. I saw in one of the sources that the anti-inflammation medications used for the lungs is related to CFRD, along with other CF related issues.

They suggested screening for CF patients from the age of 12 to be done annually. I've gone over that age but hadn't started taking any anti-inflamation meds (NAC) until about two years ago.

So, I'm still not feeling all that well, and have been getting low blood sugar episodes quite frequently the past few days.

I'm wondering if there are any particular signs to notice that would highly suggest CFRD, outside of being rushed to the Emergency Room?

I don't wanna risk having to go by Ambulance to the Emergency Room in this country...they may end up driving me around town for a few hours before a hospital would finally take me...but by then it would be too late <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-sad.gif" border="0">

65rosessamurai
03-23-2009, 01:01 AM
Since last Thursday, I've still been feeling a constant hunger and shaky hands not long after I've eaten.
<br />
<br />Last Thursday, just a half hour before lunch at work, it felt like my sugar level dropped severely as I immediately grabbed a banana (My wife gives me a banana on a daily basis) and a few other foods I found in my desk to pick myself up with before lunch time.
<br />
<br />With my jeans feeling loose for the past few days and being able to tighten my belt an extra notch, I thought I was loosing weight...only to find that I've gained it when I checked the next morning.
<br />
<br />I haven't gone to see the doc, since I don't even know how to explain in enough detail as to what I'm dealing with. Besides, I was hoping to educate myself a little more about CFRD and Diabetes before going to an "unexperienced" doc in the CF field.
<br />
<br />I did some minor searching on CFRD, to find that it is a cross between the typical "Type 1" and "Type 2". I think my relatives on my mom's side might have Type 1, since they take insulin. The MIL also was diabetic, perhaps a Type 2, but since her diet had been controlled, her weight went down, and her diabetes meds had changed. She only took pills, so I'm guessing with the Type 2, the pills helped the body to use the insulin she's producing.
<br />
<br />I found two sources, one was from the University of Wisconsin, I think the other one was related to the CF foundation. I saw in one of the sources that the anti-inflammation medications used for the lungs is related to CFRD, along with other CF related issues.
<br />
<br />They suggested screening for CF patients from the age of 12 to be done annually. I've gone over that age but hadn't started taking any anti-inflamation meds (NAC) until about two years ago.
<br />
<br />So, I'm still not feeling all that well, and have been getting low blood sugar episodes quite frequently the past few days.
<br />
<br />I'm wondering if there are any particular signs to notice that would highly suggest CFRD, outside of being rushed to the Emergency Room?
<br />
<br />I don't wanna risk having to go by Ambulance to the Emergency Room in this country...they may end up driving me around town for a few hours before a hospital would finally take me...but by then it would be too late <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-sad.gif" border="0">
<br />
<br />

saveferris2009
03-23-2009, 01:29 AM
Sounds like low blood sugar instead of high - so hypoglycemia instead if hyperglycemia (diabetes). I don't have CFRD so I can't speak to it.

But I've had hypo innumberable times in my life. Here's how it was explained to me:

Our pancrease can get damanged and ducts clogged with mucus. So when we eat, our body signals to our pancrease to secret insulin. But sometimes it takes the insulin a bit longer to get into the blood stream than it should. So the insulin reaches the blood well after it's needed, and wham! you have all this insulin with no need- hence low blood sugar.

this is just one of the many hypoglycemia scenarios... but it might be something you're experiencing.

if you're concerned, your doc should be able to give you a two hour oral glucose tolerance test. the CFF asks EVERYONE to get it yearly. here's how it goes: you fast for a min of 10 hours. then get your blood drawn. You then drink 75mg of "glucola" and have your blood drawn 1 hour post drink. then 2 hours post drink.

they take the blood to check out if you're diabetic or not.

that could be an easy test i would imagine they'd be able to give you without too much explanation.

hope you get things resolved soon! <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0">

saveferris2009
03-23-2009, 01:29 AM
Sounds like low blood sugar instead of high - so hypoglycemia instead if hyperglycemia (diabetes). I don't have CFRD so I can't speak to it.

But I've had hypo innumberable times in my life. Here's how it was explained to me:

Our pancrease can get damanged and ducts clogged with mucus. So when we eat, our body signals to our pancrease to secret insulin. But sometimes it takes the insulin a bit longer to get into the blood stream than it should. So the insulin reaches the blood well after it's needed, and wham! you have all this insulin with no need- hence low blood sugar.

this is just one of the many hypoglycemia scenarios... but it might be something you're experiencing.

if you're concerned, your doc should be able to give you a two hour oral glucose tolerance test. the CFF asks EVERYONE to get it yearly. here's how it goes: you fast for a min of 10 hours. then get your blood drawn. You then drink 75mg of "glucola" and have your blood drawn 1 hour post drink. then 2 hours post drink.

they take the blood to check out if you're diabetic or not.

that could be an easy test i would imagine they'd be able to give you without too much explanation.

hope you get things resolved soon! <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0">

saveferris2009
03-23-2009, 01:29 AM
Sounds like low blood sugar instead of high - so hypoglycemia instead if hyperglycemia (diabetes). I don't have CFRD so I can't speak to it.

But I've had hypo innumberable times in my life. Here's how it was explained to me:

Our pancrease can get damanged and ducts clogged with mucus. So when we eat, our body signals to our pancrease to secret insulin. But sometimes it takes the insulin a bit longer to get into the blood stream than it should. So the insulin reaches the blood well after it's needed, and wham! you have all this insulin with no need- hence low blood sugar.

this is just one of the many hypoglycemia scenarios... but it might be something you're experiencing.

if you're concerned, your doc should be able to give you a two hour oral glucose tolerance test. the CFF asks EVERYONE to get it yearly. here's how it goes: you fast for a min of 10 hours. then get your blood drawn. You then drink 75mg of "glucola" and have your blood drawn 1 hour post drink. then 2 hours post drink.

they take the blood to check out if you're diabetic or not.

that could be an easy test i would imagine they'd be able to give you without too much explanation.

hope you get things resolved soon! <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0">

saveferris2009
03-23-2009, 01:29 AM
Sounds like low blood sugar instead of high - so hypoglycemia instead if hyperglycemia (diabetes). I don't have CFRD so I can't speak to it.

But I've had hypo innumberable times in my life. Here's how it was explained to me:

Our pancrease can get damanged and ducts clogged with mucus. So when we eat, our body signals to our pancrease to secret insulin. But sometimes it takes the insulin a bit longer to get into the blood stream than it should. So the insulin reaches the blood well after it's needed, and wham! you have all this insulin with no need- hence low blood sugar.

this is just one of the many hypoglycemia scenarios... but it might be something you're experiencing.

if you're concerned, your doc should be able to give you a two hour oral glucose tolerance test. the CFF asks EVERYONE to get it yearly. here's how it goes: you fast for a min of 10 hours. then get your blood drawn. You then drink 75mg of "glucola" and have your blood drawn 1 hour post drink. then 2 hours post drink.

they take the blood to check out if you're diabetic or not.

that could be an easy test i would imagine they'd be able to give you without too much explanation.

hope you get things resolved soon! <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0">

saveferris2009
03-23-2009, 01:29 AM
Sounds like low blood sugar instead of high - so hypoglycemia instead if hyperglycemia (diabetes). I don't have CFRD so I can't speak to it.
<br />
<br />But I've had hypo innumberable times in my life. Here's how it was explained to me:
<br />
<br />Our pancrease can get damanged and ducts clogged with mucus. So when we eat, our body signals to our pancrease to secret insulin. But sometimes it takes the insulin a bit longer to get into the blood stream than it should. So the insulin reaches the blood well after it's needed, and wham! you have all this insulin with no need- hence low blood sugar.
<br />
<br />this is just one of the many hypoglycemia scenarios... but it might be something you're experiencing.
<br />
<br />if you're concerned, your doc should be able to give you a two hour oral glucose tolerance test. the CFF asks EVERYONE to get it yearly. here's how it goes: you fast for a min of 10 hours. then get your blood drawn. You then drink 75mg of "glucola" and have your blood drawn 1 hour post drink. then 2 hours post drink.
<br />
<br />they take the blood to check out if you're diabetic or not.
<br />
<br />that could be an easy test i would imagine they'd be able to give you without too much explanation.
<br />
<br />hope you get things resolved soon! <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0">

PedsNP2007
03-23-2009, 01:46 AM
Hey Fred,
First, you need to have a oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in which you drink ~70 grams of straight carbohydrate and have blood glucose levels drawn (pre-drink, 1 hour post, 2 hours post). Depending on the lab conversion in Japan, usually >260 1-hour post and >200 2-hour post is consistent with CFRD. Now, it's hard to really say if that means you need insulin. No one just eats straight carbs... fats and proteins help stabilize glucose levels.

Second, you need to get a glucometer. Testing 6 times a day (hard to do if you eat irregularly) and recording what you eat (including how many grams of carbs) are both helpful in determining what your pancreas is OR isn't doing for you.

In short, our pancreas (for us with PI issues) is stupid. It's scarred from pancreatic enzymes being stuck there (almost like a self-digesting issue)... It eventually goes from exocrine failure (where the PI comes from) to endocrine function (where you no longer can secrete enoug insulin to meet your needs). Also resistance to insulin at the cellular level is an issue and occurs from ongoing inflammation and infections (the stress response of the body) one with CF has over their lifetime. Some points, the pancreas doesn't excrete enough insulin and you get a high reading after you eat (2 hours is the time that endocrinologists usually care about). Some points the pancreas decides to secrete too much and that's when you get your low symptoms, requiring you to eat something since you feel like crap!

So, I hope that helps a little bit. Usually diet can control CFRD, but once the pancreas fails (which could be quick or slow), then insulin is required. Some people need insulin during acute illness and not when healthy.

I just monitor my sugars and haven't needed to do insulin. I also eat small frequent meals which is a way to combat the big pancreas response. If the pancreas is secreting small amounts of insulin in response to food that is eaten over a long period of time, you get less highs and lows. But then again, it's not an ideal way to eat lol.

I am sure there will be more ppl who can add to this beginning information I gave you. I'll post some links to good information I have found. There is research that treating CFRD is necessary when it is linked with health decline. There is not a lot out there for those glucose intolerant (when sugars are less than 200 but still higher than normal). The links will address those with a couple pdfs that are good.

Jennifer
30 yo cf

PedsNP2007
03-23-2009, 01:46 AM
Hey Fred,
First, you need to have a oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in which you drink ~70 grams of straight carbohydrate and have blood glucose levels drawn (pre-drink, 1 hour post, 2 hours post). Depending on the lab conversion in Japan, usually >260 1-hour post and >200 2-hour post is consistent with CFRD. Now, it's hard to really say if that means you need insulin. No one just eats straight carbs... fats and proteins help stabilize glucose levels.

Second, you need to get a glucometer. Testing 6 times a day (hard to do if you eat irregularly) and recording what you eat (including how many grams of carbs) are both helpful in determining what your pancreas is OR isn't doing for you.

In short, our pancreas (for us with PI issues) is stupid. It's scarred from pancreatic enzymes being stuck there (almost like a self-digesting issue)... It eventually goes from exocrine failure (where the PI comes from) to endocrine function (where you no longer can secrete enoug insulin to meet your needs). Also resistance to insulin at the cellular level is an issue and occurs from ongoing inflammation and infections (the stress response of the body) one with CF has over their lifetime. Some points, the pancreas doesn't excrete enough insulin and you get a high reading after you eat (2 hours is the time that endocrinologists usually care about). Some points the pancreas decides to secrete too much and that's when you get your low symptoms, requiring you to eat something since you feel like crap!

So, I hope that helps a little bit. Usually diet can control CFRD, but once the pancreas fails (which could be quick or slow), then insulin is required. Some people need insulin during acute illness and not when healthy.

I just monitor my sugars and haven't needed to do insulin. I also eat small frequent meals which is a way to combat the big pancreas response. If the pancreas is secreting small amounts of insulin in response to food that is eaten over a long period of time, you get less highs and lows. But then again, it's not an ideal way to eat lol.

I am sure there will be more ppl who can add to this beginning information I gave you. I'll post some links to good information I have found. There is research that treating CFRD is necessary when it is linked with health decline. There is not a lot out there for those glucose intolerant (when sugars are less than 200 but still higher than normal). The links will address those with a couple pdfs that are good.

Jennifer
30 yo cf

PedsNP2007
03-23-2009, 01:46 AM
Hey Fred,
First, you need to have a oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in which you drink ~70 grams of straight carbohydrate and have blood glucose levels drawn (pre-drink, 1 hour post, 2 hours post). Depending on the lab conversion in Japan, usually >260 1-hour post and >200 2-hour post is consistent with CFRD. Now, it's hard to really say if that means you need insulin. No one just eats straight carbs... fats and proteins help stabilize glucose levels.

Second, you need to get a glucometer. Testing 6 times a day (hard to do if you eat irregularly) and recording what you eat (including how many grams of carbs) are both helpful in determining what your pancreas is OR isn't doing for you.

In short, our pancreas (for us with PI issues) is stupid. It's scarred from pancreatic enzymes being stuck there (almost like a self-digesting issue)... It eventually goes from exocrine failure (where the PI comes from) to endocrine function (where you no longer can secrete enoug insulin to meet your needs). Also resistance to insulin at the cellular level is an issue and occurs from ongoing inflammation and infections (the stress response of the body) one with CF has over their lifetime. Some points, the pancreas doesn't excrete enough insulin and you get a high reading after you eat (2 hours is the time that endocrinologists usually care about). Some points the pancreas decides to secrete too much and that's when you get your low symptoms, requiring you to eat something since you feel like crap!

So, I hope that helps a little bit. Usually diet can control CFRD, but once the pancreas fails (which could be quick or slow), then insulin is required. Some people need insulin during acute illness and not when healthy.

I just monitor my sugars and haven't needed to do insulin. I also eat small frequent meals which is a way to combat the big pancreas response. If the pancreas is secreting small amounts of insulin in response to food that is eaten over a long period of time, you get less highs and lows. But then again, it's not an ideal way to eat lol.

I am sure there will be more ppl who can add to this beginning information I gave you. I'll post some links to good information I have found. There is research that treating CFRD is necessary when it is linked with health decline. There is not a lot out there for those glucose intolerant (when sugars are less than 200 but still higher than normal). The links will address those with a couple pdfs that are good.

Jennifer
30 yo cf

PedsNP2007
03-23-2009, 01:46 AM
Hey Fred,
First, you need to have a oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in which you drink ~70 grams of straight carbohydrate and have blood glucose levels drawn (pre-drink, 1 hour post, 2 hours post). Depending on the lab conversion in Japan, usually >260 1-hour post and >200 2-hour post is consistent with CFRD. Now, it's hard to really say if that means you need insulin. No one just eats straight carbs... fats and proteins help stabilize glucose levels.

Second, you need to get a glucometer. Testing 6 times a day (hard to do if you eat irregularly) and recording what you eat (including how many grams of carbs) are both helpful in determining what your pancreas is OR isn't doing for you.

In short, our pancreas (for us with PI issues) is stupid. It's scarred from pancreatic enzymes being stuck there (almost like a self-digesting issue)... It eventually goes from exocrine failure (where the PI comes from) to endocrine function (where you no longer can secrete enoug insulin to meet your needs). Also resistance to insulin at the cellular level is an issue and occurs from ongoing inflammation and infections (the stress response of the body) one with CF has over their lifetime. Some points, the pancreas doesn't excrete enough insulin and you get a high reading after you eat (2 hours is the time that endocrinologists usually care about). Some points the pancreas decides to secrete too much and that's when you get your low symptoms, requiring you to eat something since you feel like crap!

So, I hope that helps a little bit. Usually diet can control CFRD, but once the pancreas fails (which could be quick or slow), then insulin is required. Some people need insulin during acute illness and not when healthy.

I just monitor my sugars and haven't needed to do insulin. I also eat small frequent meals which is a way to combat the big pancreas response. If the pancreas is secreting small amounts of insulin in response to food that is eaten over a long period of time, you get less highs and lows. But then again, it's not an ideal way to eat lol.

I am sure there will be more ppl who can add to this beginning information I gave you. I'll post some links to good information I have found. There is research that treating CFRD is necessary when it is linked with health decline. There is not a lot out there for those glucose intolerant (when sugars are less than 200 but still higher than normal). The links will address those with a couple pdfs that are good.

Jennifer
30 yo cf

PedsNP2007
03-23-2009, 01:46 AM
Hey Fred,
<br />First, you need to have a oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in which you drink ~70 grams of straight carbohydrate and have blood glucose levels drawn (pre-drink, 1 hour post, 2 hours post). Depending on the lab conversion in Japan, usually >260 1-hour post and >200 2-hour post is consistent with CFRD. Now, it's hard to really say if that means you need insulin. No one just eats straight carbs... fats and proteins help stabilize glucose levels.
<br />
<br />Second, you need to get a glucometer. Testing 6 times a day (hard to do if you eat irregularly) and recording what you eat (including how many grams of carbs) are both helpful in determining what your pancreas is OR isn't doing for you.
<br />
<br />In short, our pancreas (for us with PI issues) is stupid. It's scarred from pancreatic enzymes being stuck there (almost like a self-digesting issue)... It eventually goes from exocrine failure (where the PI comes from) to endocrine function (where you no longer can secrete enoug insulin to meet your needs). Also resistance to insulin at the cellular level is an issue and occurs from ongoing inflammation and infections (the stress response of the body) one with CF has over their lifetime. Some points, the pancreas doesn't excrete enough insulin and you get a high reading after you eat (2 hours is the time that endocrinologists usually care about). Some points the pancreas decides to secrete too much and that's when you get your low symptoms, requiring you to eat something since you feel like crap!
<br />
<br />So, I hope that helps a little bit. Usually diet can control CFRD, but once the pancreas fails (which could be quick or slow), then insulin is required. Some people need insulin during acute illness and not when healthy.
<br />
<br />I just monitor my sugars and haven't needed to do insulin. I also eat small frequent meals which is a way to combat the big pancreas response. If the pancreas is secreting small amounts of insulin in response to food that is eaten over a long period of time, you get less highs and lows. But then again, it's not an ideal way to eat lol.
<br />
<br />I am sure there will be more ppl who can add to this beginning information I gave you. I'll post some links to good information I have found. There is research that treating CFRD is necessary when it is linked with health decline. There is not a lot out there for those glucose intolerant (when sugars are less than 200 but still higher than normal). The links will address those with a couple pdfs that are good.
<br />
<br />Jennifer
<br />30 yo cf

kmaried
03-23-2009, 02:27 AM
Hey Fred,

First, I agree with everything that everyone has said so far. I don't technically have CFRD; only low glucose tolerance; but I do take insulin so I can eat what I want and not worry about it.

I'd first and foremost recommend you get a glucose meter. That's the one guaranteed way to know if low blood sugar is causing you to feel the way you are. If it is, you are to take 15 grams (I think it is) of quick carbs -- some juice, they sell glucose tabs, etc -- wait 15 minutes and check again.

I have pretty good control, but I've learned that there are a lot of factors that impact our sugar levels -- degree of infection, included -- and sometimes, your sugar is higher or lower than you'd ex

kmaried
03-23-2009, 02:27 AM
Hey Fred,

First, I agree with everything that everyone has said so far. I don't technically have CFRD; only low glucose tolerance; but I do take insulin so I can eat what I want and not worry about it.

I'd first and foremost recommend you get a glucose meter. That's the one guaranteed way to know if low blood sugar is causing you to feel the way you are. If it is, you are to take 15 grams (I think it is) of quick carbs -- some juice, they sell glucose tabs, etc -- wait 15 minutes and check again.

I have pretty good control, but I've learned that there are a lot of factors that impact our sugar levels -- degree of infection, included -- and sometimes, your sugar is higher or lower than you'd ex

kmaried
03-23-2009, 02:27 AM
Hey Fred,

First, I agree with everything that everyone has said so far. I don't technically have CFRD; only low glucose tolerance; but I do take insulin so I can eat what I want and not worry about it.

I'd first and foremost recommend you get a glucose meter. That's the one guaranteed way to know if low blood sugar is causing you to feel the way you are. If it is, you are to take 15 grams (I think it is) of quick carbs -- some juice, they sell glucose tabs, etc -- wait 15 minutes and check again.

I have pretty good control, but I've learned that there are a lot of factors that impact our sugar levels -- degree of infection, included -- and sometimes, your sugar is higher or lower than you'd ex

kmaried
03-23-2009, 02:27 AM
Hey Fred,

First, I agree with everything that everyone has said so far. I don't technically have CFRD; only low glucose tolerance; but I do take insulin so I can eat what I want and not worry about it.

I'd first and foremost recommend you get a glucose meter. That's the one guaranteed way to know if low blood sugar is causing you to feel the way you are. If it is, you are to take 15 grams (I think it is) of quick carbs -- some juice, they sell glucose tabs, etc -- wait 15 minutes and check again.

I have pretty good control, but I've learned that there are a lot of factors that impact our sugar levels -- degree of infection, included -- and sometimes, your sugar is higher or lower than you'd ex

kmaried
03-23-2009, 02:27 AM
Hey Fred,
<br />
<br />First, I agree with everything that everyone has said so far. I don't technically have CFRD; only low glucose tolerance; but I do take insulin so I can eat what I want and not worry about it.
<br />
<br />I'd first and foremost recommend you get a glucose meter. That's the one guaranteed way to know if low blood sugar is causing you to feel the way you are. If it is, you are to take 15 grams (I think it is) of quick carbs -- some juice, they sell glucose tabs, etc -- wait 15 minutes and check again.
<br />
<br />I have pretty good control, but I've learned that there are a lot of factors that impact our sugar levels -- degree of infection, included -- and sometimes, your sugar is higher or lower than you'd ex

kmaried
03-23-2009, 02:31 AM
Sorry! Don't know why that cut me off...

Anyway, I was going to say higher or lower than you'd expect from past experience.

In the long term, you'll probably want a to do an OGTT, but in the immediate term, I'd worry about getting the Rx for the glucometer!

Good luck!
Kris

kmaried
03-23-2009, 02:31 AM
Sorry! Don't know why that cut me off...

Anyway, I was going to say higher or lower than you'd expect from past experience.

In the long term, you'll probably want a to do an OGTT, but in the immediate term, I'd worry about getting the Rx for the glucometer!

Good luck!
Kris

kmaried
03-23-2009, 02:31 AM
Sorry! Don't know why that cut me off...

Anyway, I was going to say higher or lower than you'd expect from past experience.

In the long term, you'll probably want a to do an OGTT, but in the immediate term, I'd worry about getting the Rx for the glucometer!

Good luck!
Kris

kmaried
03-23-2009, 02:31 AM
Sorry! Don't know why that cut me off...

Anyway, I was going to say higher or lower than you'd expect from past experience.

In the long term, you'll probably want a to do an OGTT, but in the immediate term, I'd worry about getting the Rx for the glucometer!

Good luck!
Kris

kmaried
03-23-2009, 02:31 AM
Sorry! Don't know why that cut me off...
<br />
<br />Anyway, I was going to say higher or lower than you'd expect from past experience.
<br />
<br />In the long term, you'll probably want a to do an OGTT, but in the immediate term, I'd worry about getting the Rx for the glucometer!
<br />
<br />Good luck!
<br />Kris

65rosessamurai
03-23-2009, 03:40 AM
Thanks everyone for the input so far.

I think the wife has something to read the blood sugar level (she got it for her mom and never even used it, yet) that I can use to check.

Being in Japan, the one concern I have is the CFRD, after realizing from the info I read about it that its not a typical type 1 or type 2 form, so I imagine very few docs (even the one I see) are going to be familiar with it.

I suppose one worse case scenario is that I contact my sister to see if she's got connections with anyone at Jewish National in Denver <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0"> and see if they can help in any way.

I looked at and did a translation (I used translation software to get the jist of the info) of a CF page in Japan, and nothing was mentioned about CFRD (Only "CFRT, related to the gene). I suppose they wouldn't since it said that as of 1994, only about 28 CF patients had been reported in Japan.

Oh, and Amy, I can relate to what you were explaining, I've had that kind of reaction for years, usually occured when I hadn't eaten for a long time. My concern now is that it has become freqent, IMO, and with the added factors of having diabetes history and how my age is getting up there, I thought developing CFRD would become a concern.

And, I'll try and keep everyone posted.

65rosessamurai
03-23-2009, 03:40 AM
Thanks everyone for the input so far.

I think the wife has something to read the blood sugar level (she got it for her mom and never even used it, yet) that I can use to check.

Being in Japan, the one concern I have is the CFRD, after realizing from the info I read about it that its not a typical type 1 or type 2 form, so I imagine very few docs (even the one I see) are going to be familiar with it.

I suppose one worse case scenario is that I contact my sister to see if she's got connections with anyone at Jewish National in Denver <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0"> and see if they can help in any way.

I looked at and did a translation (I used translation software to get the jist of the info) of a CF page in Japan, and nothing was mentioned about CFRD (Only "CFRT, related to the gene). I suppose they wouldn't since it said that as of 1994, only about 28 CF patients had been reported in Japan.

Oh, and Amy, I can relate to what you were explaining, I've had that kind of reaction for years, usually occured when I hadn't eaten for a long time. My concern now is that it has become freqent, IMO, and with the added factors of having diabetes history and how my age is getting up there, I thought developing CFRD would become a concern.

And, I'll try and keep everyone posted.

65rosessamurai
03-23-2009, 03:40 AM
Thanks everyone for the input so far.

I think the wife has something to read the blood sugar level (she got it for her mom and never even used it, yet) that I can use to check.

Being in Japan, the one concern I have is the CFRD, after realizing from the info I read about it that its not a typical type 1 or type 2 form, so I imagine very few docs (even the one I see) are going to be familiar with it.

I suppose one worse case scenario is that I contact my sister to see if she's got connections with anyone at Jewish National in Denver <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0"> and see if they can help in any way.

I looked at and did a translation (I used translation software to get the jist of the info) of a CF page in Japan, and nothing was mentioned about CFRD (Only "CFRT, related to the gene). I suppose they wouldn't since it said that as of 1994, only about 28 CF patients had been reported in Japan.

Oh, and Amy, I can relate to what you were explaining, I've had that kind of reaction for years, usually occured when I hadn't eaten for a long time. My concern now is that it has become freqent, IMO, and with the added factors of having diabetes history and how my age is getting up there, I thought developing CFRD would become a concern.

And, I'll try and keep everyone posted.

65rosessamurai
03-23-2009, 03:40 AM
Thanks everyone for the input so far.

I think the wife has something to read the blood sugar level (she got it for her mom and never even used it, yet) that I can use to check.

Being in Japan, the one concern I have is the CFRD, after realizing from the info I read about it that its not a typical type 1 or type 2 form, so I imagine very few docs (even the one I see) are going to be familiar with it.

I suppose one worse case scenario is that I contact my sister to see if she's got connections with anyone at Jewish National in Denver <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0"> and see if they can help in any way.

I looked at and did a translation (I used translation software to get the jist of the info) of a CF page in Japan, and nothing was mentioned about CFRD (Only "CFRT, related to the gene). I suppose they wouldn't since it said that as of 1994, only about 28 CF patients had been reported in Japan.

Oh, and Amy, I can relate to what you were explaining, I've had that kind of reaction for years, usually occured when I hadn't eaten for a long time. My concern now is that it has become freqent, IMO, and with the added factors of having diabetes history and how my age is getting up there, I thought developing CFRD would become a concern.

And, I'll try and keep everyone posted.

65rosessamurai
03-23-2009, 03:40 AM
Thanks everyone for the input so far.
<br />
<br />I think the wife has something to read the blood sugar level (she got it for her mom and never even used it, yet) that I can use to check.
<br />
<br />Being in Japan, the one concern I have is the CFRD, after realizing from the info I read about it that its not a typical type 1 or type 2 form, so I imagine very few docs (even the one I see) are going to be familiar with it.
<br />
<br />I suppose one worse case scenario is that I contact my sister to see if she's got connections with anyone at Jewish National in Denver <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border="0"> and see if they can help in any way.
<br />
<br />I looked at and did a translation (I used translation software to get the jist of the info) of a CF page in Japan, and nothing was mentioned about CFRD (Only "CFRT, related to the gene). I suppose they wouldn't since it said that as of 1994, only about 28 CF patients had been reported in Japan.
<br />
<br />Oh, and Amy, I can relate to what you were explaining, I've had that kind of reaction for years, usually occured when I hadn't eaten for a long time. My concern now is that it has become freqent, IMO, and with the added factors of having diabetes history and how my age is getting up there, I thought developing CFRD would become a concern.
<br />
<br />And, I'll try and keep everyone posted.

Jeana
03-23-2009, 04:06 AM
I have had CFRD for 3 years. Before being diagnosed, I definitely had some low, shaky times, too, so it could by CFRD, although generally you are looking at high blood sugars. I do think that sometimes my pancreas decides to secrete insulin and sometimes not, which makes for low times, if I've taken insulin to cover carbs. Anyway, get tested for diabetes and then if you have CFRD, feel free to ask any questions that you have.

Remember this though, CFRD is not to be controlled by diet. In order to maintain your weight, you eat what you normally would and then cover the carbs you eat by taking insulin. It's really easy and even though I hate shots, these shots don't really hurt, especially if you give them to yourself in the stomach. Anyway, that's the part of CFRD that scared me and made me be in denial about having it.

Let us know what you find out.

Jeana
03-23-2009, 04:06 AM
I have had CFRD for 3 years. Before being diagnosed, I definitely had some low, shaky times, too, so it could by CFRD, although generally you are looking at high blood sugars. I do think that sometimes my pancreas decides to secrete insulin and sometimes not, which makes for low times, if I've taken insulin to cover carbs. Anyway, get tested for diabetes and then if you have CFRD, feel free to ask any questions that you have.

Remember this though, CFRD is not to be controlled by diet. In order to maintain your weight, you eat what you normally would and then cover the carbs you eat by taking insulin. It's really easy and even though I hate shots, these shots don't really hurt, especially if you give them to yourself in the stomach. Anyway, that's the part of CFRD that scared me and made me be in denial about having it.

Let us know what you find out.

Jeana
03-23-2009, 04:06 AM
I have had CFRD for 3 years. Before being diagnosed, I definitely had some low, shaky times, too, so it could by CFRD, although generally you are looking at high blood sugars. I do think that sometimes my pancreas decides to secrete insulin and sometimes not, which makes for low times, if I've taken insulin to cover carbs. Anyway, get tested for diabetes and then if you have CFRD, feel free to ask any questions that you have.

Remember this though, CFRD is not to be controlled by diet. In order to maintain your weight, you eat what you normally would and then cover the carbs you eat by taking insulin. It's really easy and even though I hate shots, these shots don't really hurt, especially if you give them to yourself in the stomach. Anyway, that's the part of CFRD that scared me and made me be in denial about having it.

Let us know what you find out.

Jeana
03-23-2009, 04:06 AM
I have had CFRD for 3 years. Before being diagnosed, I definitely had some low, shaky times, too, so it could by CFRD, although generally you are looking at high blood sugars. I do think that sometimes my pancreas decides to secrete insulin and sometimes not, which makes for low times, if I've taken insulin to cover carbs. Anyway, get tested for diabetes and then if you have CFRD, feel free to ask any questions that you have.

Remember this though, CFRD is not to be controlled by diet. In order to maintain your weight, you eat what you normally would and then cover the carbs you eat by taking insulin. It's really easy and even though I hate shots, these shots don't really hurt, especially if you give them to yourself in the stomach. Anyway, that's the part of CFRD that scared me and made me be in denial about having it.

Let us know what you find out.

Jeana
03-23-2009, 04:06 AM
I have had CFRD for 3 years. Before being diagnosed, I definitely had some low, shaky times, too, so it could by CFRD, although generally you are looking at high blood sugars. I do think that sometimes my pancreas decides to secrete insulin and sometimes not, which makes for low times, if I've taken insulin to cover carbs. Anyway, get tested for diabetes and then if you have CFRD, feel free to ask any questions that you have.
<br />
<br />Remember this though, CFRD is not to be controlled by diet. In order to maintain your weight, you eat what you normally would and then cover the carbs you eat by taking insulin. It's really easy and even though I hate shots, these shots don't really hurt, especially if you give them to yourself in the stomach. Anyway, that's the part of CFRD that scared me and made me be in denial about having it.
<br />
<br />Let us know what you find out.

PedsNP2007
03-23-2009, 10:34 AM
Jeana,

I hope it wasn't implied that CFRD is diet controlled. I control it by diet right now by eating freq, but plenty of calories... People unfamiliar with CFRD don't know it is not a diet controlled because of our calorie need. I know at some point I will need insulin, but I am holding well above my low weight so I choose to not do insulin.

:-) Jenn
30 yo cf

PedsNP2007
03-23-2009, 10:34 AM
Jeana,

I hope it wasn't implied that CFRD is diet controlled. I control it by diet right now by eating freq, but plenty of calories... People unfamiliar with CFRD don't know it is not a diet controlled because of our calorie need. I know at some point I will need insulin, but I am holding well above my low weight so I choose to not do insulin.

:-) Jenn
30 yo cf

PedsNP2007
03-23-2009, 10:34 AM
Jeana,

I hope it wasn't implied that CFRD is diet controlled. I control it by diet right now by eating freq, but plenty of calories... People unfamiliar with CFRD don't know it is not a diet controlled because of our calorie need. I know at some point I will need insulin, but I am holding well above my low weight so I choose to not do insulin.

:-) Jenn
30 yo cf

PedsNP2007
03-23-2009, 10:34 AM
Jeana,

I hope it wasn't implied that CFRD is diet controlled. I control it by diet right now by eating freq, but plenty of calories... People unfamiliar with CFRD don't know it is not a diet controlled because of our calorie need. I know at some point I will need insulin, but I am holding well above my low weight so I choose to not do insulin.

:-) Jenn
30 yo cf

PedsNP2007
03-23-2009, 10:34 AM
Jeana,
<br />
<br />I hope it wasn't implied that CFRD is diet controlled. I control it by diet right now by eating freq, but plenty of calories... People unfamiliar with CFRD don't know it is not a diet controlled because of our calorie need. I know at some point I will need insulin, but I am holding well above my low weight so I choose to not do insulin.
<br />
<br />:-) Jenn
<br />30 yo cf

Jeana
03-23-2009, 11:13 AM
Jenn,

I just wanted to be sure that the Japan doctors, possibly not having dealt with CFRD, didn't request that he control it with diet. Of course, if your weight is up and maybe your CFRD is mild at this point, you could probably just eat fewer carbs, but that is not the typical recommendation for CFers with CFRD. Lucky you, though. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-wink.gif" border="0">

Jeana
03-23-2009, 11:13 AM
Jenn,

I just wanted to be sure that the Japan doctors, possibly not having dealt with CFRD, didn't request that he control it with diet. Of course, if your weight is up and maybe your CFRD is mild at this point, you could probably just eat fewer carbs, but that is not the typical recommendation for CFers with CFRD. Lucky you, though. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-wink.gif" border="0">

Jeana
03-23-2009, 11:13 AM
Jenn,

I just wanted to be sure that the Japan doctors, possibly not having dealt with CFRD, didn't request that he control it with diet. Of course, if your weight is up and maybe your CFRD is mild at this point, you could probably just eat fewer carbs, but that is not the typical recommendation for CFers with CFRD. Lucky you, though. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-wink.gif" border="0">

Jeana
03-23-2009, 11:13 AM
Jenn,

I just wanted to be sure that the Japan doctors, possibly not having dealt with CFRD, didn't request that he control it with diet. Of course, if your weight is up and maybe your CFRD is mild at this point, you could probably just eat fewer carbs, but that is not the typical recommendation for CFers with CFRD. Lucky you, though. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-wink.gif" border="0">

Jeana
03-23-2009, 11:13 AM
Jenn,
<br />
<br />I just wanted to be sure that the Japan doctors, possibly not having dealt with CFRD, didn't request that he control it with diet. Of course, if your weight is up and maybe your CFRD is mild at this point, you could probably just eat fewer carbs, but that is not the typical recommendation for CFers with CFRD. Lucky you, though. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-wink.gif" border="0">