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mabusincarnate
10-20-2008, 01:54 AM
i worked hard and built a good career. i'm taking 2 classes per semester and i'll be done with school in 5 more classes. it all sounds great on the surface.

i'm not happy.

i'm too realistic to believe a cure is on the way. it might be but probably not in my lifetime.

that leaves me with 2 options. keep doing something that doesnt make me happy even though it makes me financially comfortable OR do something i like even if it means i'll be broke.

i took a break while writing this. during that break i completely broke down. i haven't cried in 7 years and i don't know if i've ever cried like that before. anyway, i made up my mind. now i'd like to hear what other people think.

what do you do if you know you have 10 years to live?

mabusincarnate
10-20-2008, 01:54 AM
i worked hard and built a good career. i'm taking 2 classes per semester and i'll be done with school in 5 more classes. it all sounds great on the surface.

i'm not happy.

i'm too realistic to believe a cure is on the way. it might be but probably not in my lifetime.

that leaves me with 2 options. keep doing something that doesnt make me happy even though it makes me financially comfortable OR do something i like even if it means i'll be broke.

i took a break while writing this. during that break i completely broke down. i haven't cried in 7 years and i don't know if i've ever cried like that before. anyway, i made up my mind. now i'd like to hear what other people think.

what do you do if you know you have 10 years to live?

mabusincarnate
10-20-2008, 01:54 AM
i worked hard and built a good career. i'm taking 2 classes per semester and i'll be done with school in 5 more classes. it all sounds great on the surface.

i'm not happy.

i'm too realistic to believe a cure is on the way. it might be but probably not in my lifetime.

that leaves me with 2 options. keep doing something that doesnt make me happy even though it makes me financially comfortable OR do something i like even if it means i'll be broke.

i took a break while writing this. during that break i completely broke down. i haven't cried in 7 years and i don't know if i've ever cried like that before. anyway, i made up my mind. now i'd like to hear what other people think.

what do you do if you know you have 10 years to live?

mabusincarnate
10-20-2008, 01:54 AM
i worked hard and built a good career. i'm taking 2 classes per semester and i'll be done with school in 5 more classes. it all sounds great on the surface.

i'm not happy.

i'm too realistic to believe a cure is on the way. it might be but probably not in my lifetime.

that leaves me with 2 options. keep doing something that doesnt make me happy even though it makes me financially comfortable OR do something i like even if it means i'll be broke.

i took a break while writing this. during that break i completely broke down. i haven't cried in 7 years and i don't know if i've ever cried like that before. anyway, i made up my mind. now i'd like to hear what other people think.

what do you do if you know you have 10 years to live?

mabusincarnate
10-20-2008, 01:54 AM
i worked hard and built a good career. i'm taking 2 classes per semester and i'll be done with school in 5 more classes. it all sounds great on the surface.
<br />
<br />i'm not happy.
<br />
<br />i'm too realistic to believe a cure is on the way. it might be but probably not in my lifetime.
<br />
<br />that leaves me with 2 options. keep doing something that doesnt make me happy even though it makes me financially comfortable OR do something i like even if it means i'll be broke.
<br />
<br />i took a break while writing this. during that break i completely broke down. i haven't cried in 7 years and i don't know if i've ever cried like that before. anyway, i made up my mind. now i'd like to hear what other people think.
<br />
<br />what do you do if you know you have 10 years to live?

MicheleGazelle
10-20-2008, 03:09 AM
I'm having a really miserable night, so this is likely to be a barely coherent post. Please excuse any typos or "nuttiness".

I didn't really learn to live until I spent a lot of time at death's door. I spent a long time (about 3 1/2 years) in constant excruciating pain. At some point in there, my goal was to hurt less. I began taking hot baths daily because it helped get the pain under control and began doing other things that helped get the pain under control because pain killers hardly took the edge off. At some point, I realized that the hot baths and other stuff I was doing was actually killing the infection the doctors didn't know how to treat and I would live. I really wasn't a happy camper at that point because I realized it would be a long, torturous recovery.

Not long thereafter, I decided to get divorced under very difficult circumstances. Everyone told me I couldn't "afford" to get divorced because of my health problems. I felt clear that I couldn't afford not to get divorced because my marriage was literally part of what was killing me.

I have two ASD (autism spectrum disorder) kids who just don't get a lot of social and emotional stuff and just don't understand my philosophical/spiritual point of view much of the time. I did manage to make sense to my oldest when I told him that I think "karma" and life-threatening things in life are kind of like dying in a video game: it's a way of telling me that what I'm doing isn't working and I better figure out what will work or Game Over. I began using a lot of alternative stuff without really knowing what I was doing because I had two options: The safe, secure path of certain slow death or the risky path of possible death. Given how much constant pain I was in and how hopeless the situation was, I felt like an, oops!, quicker death because I screwed up would be the better deal. So whether I died faster or got healthier, I felt like either way would be an improvement over what I was facing. So I took risks, even though I am an inherently conservative person.

I fret a LOT about my current financial problems. When I look back on things, I cannot think of a single thing I could have done differently or would have done differently. My son wcf is well and I am getting well. Unlike during my marriage, I believe these financial problems will eventually get resolved. I have gradually grown healthier and stronger. I am well enough to work a full time job for the first time in my life. I have learned to relate to people differently and to surround myself more with people whose company I enjoy and not bother so much with social "obligations" to people I can't stand who were sucking the life out of me. I have hopes and dreams concerning eventually making a living at something that means more to me than my current job. I sometimes listen to the song "Live like you were dying" and feel like announcing "that was written about me!!" (so to speak).

I don't believe it has to only be 10 years. I believe that if you have "no future" you should live for today and enjoy your life as much as possible, not caring so much about "shoulds" and what other people think (least of all me, so don't worry what I think of you -- I'm just spouting off because I am having a miserable "please kill me NOW" type evening of endless pain). I believe whatever challenges I was born with have been an opportunity for my soul to grow and to help me resolve personal bs that I wouldn't fix any other way. That what I have suffered has been a gift. I would not have divorced if I hadn't spent so much time at death's door because I tend to be hopelessly loyal. It took a lot for me to learn to say "enough". Learning to say "enough" was worth the price I paid to learn it.

I hope you find your bliss, whatever it is, and that you get what you most need, even if it isn't always exactly what you wanted.

Good luck with this question and with your decision.

MicheleGazelle
10-20-2008, 03:09 AM
I'm having a really miserable night, so this is likely to be a barely coherent post. Please excuse any typos or "nuttiness".

I didn't really learn to live until I spent a lot of time at death's door. I spent a long time (about 3 1/2 years) in constant excruciating pain. At some point in there, my goal was to hurt less. I began taking hot baths daily because it helped get the pain under control and began doing other things that helped get the pain under control because pain killers hardly took the edge off. At some point, I realized that the hot baths and other stuff I was doing was actually killing the infection the doctors didn't know how to treat and I would live. I really wasn't a happy camper at that point because I realized it would be a long, torturous recovery.

Not long thereafter, I decided to get divorced under very difficult circumstances. Everyone told me I couldn't "afford" to get divorced because of my health problems. I felt clear that I couldn't afford not to get divorced because my marriage was literally part of what was killing me.

I have two ASD (autism spectrum disorder) kids who just don't get a lot of social and emotional stuff and just don't understand my philosophical/spiritual point of view much of the time. I did manage to make sense to my oldest when I told him that I think "karma" and life-threatening things in life are kind of like dying in a video game: it's a way of telling me that what I'm doing isn't working and I better figure out what will work or Game Over. I began using a lot of alternative stuff without really knowing what I was doing because I had two options: The safe, secure path of certain slow death or the risky path of possible death. Given how much constant pain I was in and how hopeless the situation was, I felt like an, oops!, quicker death because I screwed up would be the better deal. So whether I died faster or got healthier, I felt like either way would be an improvement over what I was facing. So I took risks, even though I am an inherently conservative person.

I fret a LOT about my current financial problems. When I look back on things, I cannot think of a single thing I could have done differently or would have done differently. My son wcf is well and I am getting well. Unlike during my marriage, I believe these financial problems will eventually get resolved. I have gradually grown healthier and stronger. I am well enough to work a full time job for the first time in my life. I have learned to relate to people differently and to surround myself more with people whose company I enjoy and not bother so much with social "obligations" to people I can't stand who were sucking the life out of me. I have hopes and dreams concerning eventually making a living at something that means more to me than my current job. I sometimes listen to the song "Live like you were dying" and feel like announcing "that was written about me!!" (so to speak).

I don't believe it has to only be 10 years. I believe that if you have "no future" you should live for today and enjoy your life as much as possible, not caring so much about "shoulds" and what other people think (least of all me, so don't worry what I think of you -- I'm just spouting off because I am having a miserable "please kill me NOW" type evening of endless pain). I believe whatever challenges I was born with have been an opportunity for my soul to grow and to help me resolve personal bs that I wouldn't fix any other way. That what I have suffered has been a gift. I would not have divorced if I hadn't spent so much time at death's door because I tend to be hopelessly loyal. It took a lot for me to learn to say "enough". Learning to say "enough" was worth the price I paid to learn it.

I hope you find your bliss, whatever it is, and that you get what you most need, even if it isn't always exactly what you wanted.

Good luck with this question and with your decision.

MicheleGazelle
10-20-2008, 03:09 AM
I'm having a really miserable night, so this is likely to be a barely coherent post. Please excuse any typos or "nuttiness".

I didn't really learn to live until I spent a lot of time at death's door. I spent a long time (about 3 1/2 years) in constant excruciating pain. At some point in there, my goal was to hurt less. I began taking hot baths daily because it helped get the pain under control and began doing other things that helped get the pain under control because pain killers hardly took the edge off. At some point, I realized that the hot baths and other stuff I was doing was actually killing the infection the doctors didn't know how to treat and I would live. I really wasn't a happy camper at that point because I realized it would be a long, torturous recovery.

Not long thereafter, I decided to get divorced under very difficult circumstances. Everyone told me I couldn't "afford" to get divorced because of my health problems. I felt clear that I couldn't afford not to get divorced because my marriage was literally part of what was killing me.

I have two ASD (autism spectrum disorder) kids who just don't get a lot of social and emotional stuff and just don't understand my philosophical/spiritual point of view much of the time. I did manage to make sense to my oldest when I told him that I think "karma" and life-threatening things in life are kind of like dying in a video game: it's a way of telling me that what I'm doing isn't working and I better figure out what will work or Game Over. I began using a lot of alternative stuff without really knowing what I was doing because I had two options: The safe, secure path of certain slow death or the risky path of possible death. Given how much constant pain I was in and how hopeless the situation was, I felt like an, oops!, quicker death because I screwed up would be the better deal. So whether I died faster or got healthier, I felt like either way would be an improvement over what I was facing. So I took risks, even though I am an inherently conservative person.

I fret a LOT about my current financial problems. When I look back on things, I cannot think of a single thing I could have done differently or would have done differently. My son wcf is well and I am getting well. Unlike during my marriage, I believe these financial problems will eventually get resolved. I have gradually grown healthier and stronger. I am well enough to work a full time job for the first time in my life. I have learned to relate to people differently and to surround myself more with people whose company I enjoy and not bother so much with social "obligations" to people I can't stand who were sucking the life out of me. I have hopes and dreams concerning eventually making a living at something that means more to me than my current job. I sometimes listen to the song "Live like you were dying" and feel like announcing "that was written about me!!" (so to speak).

I don't believe it has to only be 10 years. I believe that if you have "no future" you should live for today and enjoy your life as much as possible, not caring so much about "shoulds" and what other people think (least of all me, so don't worry what I think of you -- I'm just spouting off because I am having a miserable "please kill me NOW" type evening of endless pain). I believe whatever challenges I was born with have been an opportunity for my soul to grow and to help me resolve personal bs that I wouldn't fix any other way. That what I have suffered has been a gift. I would not have divorced if I hadn't spent so much time at death's door because I tend to be hopelessly loyal. It took a lot for me to learn to say "enough". Learning to say "enough" was worth the price I paid to learn it.

I hope you find your bliss, whatever it is, and that you get what you most need, even if it isn't always exactly what you wanted.

Good luck with this question and with your decision.

MicheleGazelle
10-20-2008, 03:09 AM
I'm having a really miserable night, so this is likely to be a barely coherent post. Please excuse any typos or "nuttiness".

I didn't really learn to live until I spent a lot of time at death's door. I spent a long time (about 3 1/2 years) in constant excruciating pain. At some point in there, my goal was to hurt less. I began taking hot baths daily because it helped get the pain under control and began doing other things that helped get the pain under control because pain killers hardly took the edge off. At some point, I realized that the hot baths and other stuff I was doing was actually killing the infection the doctors didn't know how to treat and I would live. I really wasn't a happy camper at that point because I realized it would be a long, torturous recovery.

Not long thereafter, I decided to get divorced under very difficult circumstances. Everyone told me I couldn't "afford" to get divorced because of my health problems. I felt clear that I couldn't afford not to get divorced because my marriage was literally part of what was killing me.

I have two ASD (autism spectrum disorder) kids who just don't get a lot of social and emotional stuff and just don't understand my philosophical/spiritual point of view much of the time. I did manage to make sense to my oldest when I told him that I think "karma" and life-threatening things in life are kind of like dying in a video game: it's a way of telling me that what I'm doing isn't working and I better figure out what will work or Game Over. I began using a lot of alternative stuff without really knowing what I was doing because I had two options: The safe, secure path of certain slow death or the risky path of possible death. Given how much constant pain I was in and how hopeless the situation was, I felt like an, oops!, quicker death because I screwed up would be the better deal. So whether I died faster or got healthier, I felt like either way would be an improvement over what I was facing. So I took risks, even though I am an inherently conservative person.

I fret a LOT about my current financial problems. When I look back on things, I cannot think of a single thing I could have done differently or would have done differently. My son wcf is well and I am getting well. Unlike during my marriage, I believe these financial problems will eventually get resolved. I have gradually grown healthier and stronger. I am well enough to work a full time job for the first time in my life. I have learned to relate to people differently and to surround myself more with people whose company I enjoy and not bother so much with social "obligations" to people I can't stand who were sucking the life out of me. I have hopes and dreams concerning eventually making a living at something that means more to me than my current job. I sometimes listen to the song "Live like you were dying" and feel like announcing "that was written about me!!" (so to speak).

I don't believe it has to only be 10 years. I believe that if you have "no future" you should live for today and enjoy your life as much as possible, not caring so much about "shoulds" and what other people think (least of all me, so don't worry what I think of you -- I'm just spouting off because I am having a miserable "please kill me NOW" type evening of endless pain). I believe whatever challenges I was born with have been an opportunity for my soul to grow and to help me resolve personal bs that I wouldn't fix any other way. That what I have suffered has been a gift. I would not have divorced if I hadn't spent so much time at death's door because I tend to be hopelessly loyal. It took a lot for me to learn to say "enough". Learning to say "enough" was worth the price I paid to learn it.

I hope you find your bliss, whatever it is, and that you get what you most need, even if it isn't always exactly what you wanted.

Good luck with this question and with your decision.

MicheleGazelle
10-20-2008, 03:09 AM
I'm having a really miserable night, so this is likely to be a barely coherent post. Please excuse any typos or "nuttiness".
<br />
<br />I didn't really learn to live until I spent a lot of time at death's door. I spent a long time (about 3 1/2 years) in constant excruciating pain. At some point in there, my goal was to hurt less. I began taking hot baths daily because it helped get the pain under control and began doing other things that helped get the pain under control because pain killers hardly took the edge off. At some point, I realized that the hot baths and other stuff I was doing was actually killing the infection the doctors didn't know how to treat and I would live. I really wasn't a happy camper at that point because I realized it would be a long, torturous recovery.
<br />
<br />Not long thereafter, I decided to get divorced under very difficult circumstances. Everyone told me I couldn't "afford" to get divorced because of my health problems. I felt clear that I couldn't afford not to get divorced because my marriage was literally part of what was killing me.
<br />
<br />I have two ASD (autism spectrum disorder) kids who just don't get a lot of social and emotional stuff and just don't understand my philosophical/spiritual point of view much of the time. I did manage to make sense to my oldest when I told him that I think "karma" and life-threatening things in life are kind of like dying in a video game: it's a way of telling me that what I'm doing isn't working and I better figure out what will work or Game Over. I began using a lot of alternative stuff without really knowing what I was doing because I had two options: The safe, secure path of certain slow death or the risky path of possible death. Given how much constant pain I was in and how hopeless the situation was, I felt like an, oops!, quicker death because I screwed up would be the better deal. So whether I died faster or got healthier, I felt like either way would be an improvement over what I was facing. So I took risks, even though I am an inherently conservative person.
<br />
<br />I fret a LOT about my current financial problems. When I look back on things, I cannot think of a single thing I could have done differently or would have done differently. My son wcf is well and I am getting well. Unlike during my marriage, I believe these financial problems will eventually get resolved. I have gradually grown healthier and stronger. I am well enough to work a full time job for the first time in my life. I have learned to relate to people differently and to surround myself more with people whose company I enjoy and not bother so much with social "obligations" to people I can't stand who were sucking the life out of me. I have hopes and dreams concerning eventually making a living at something that means more to me than my current job. I sometimes listen to the song "Live like you were dying" and feel like announcing "that was written about me!!" (so to speak).
<br />
<br />I don't believe it has to only be 10 years. I believe that if you have "no future" you should live for today and enjoy your life as much as possible, not caring so much about "shoulds" and what other people think (least of all me, so don't worry what I think of you -- I'm just spouting off because I am having a miserable "please kill me NOW" type evening of endless pain). I believe whatever challenges I was born with have been an opportunity for my soul to grow and to help me resolve personal bs that I wouldn't fix any other way. That what I have suffered has been a gift. I would not have divorced if I hadn't spent so much time at death's door because I tend to be hopelessly loyal. It took a lot for me to learn to say "enough". Learning to say "enough" was worth the price I paid to learn it.
<br />
<br />I hope you find your bliss, whatever it is, and that you get what you most need, even if it isn't always exactly what you wanted.
<br />
<br />Good luck with this question and with your decision.

Nightwriter
10-20-2008, 03:44 AM
Follow your heart's desire. Whether you are here for a day or ten years or beyond. You've picked out a number of 10 years. People break doctors' expectations all the time-- sheer will can change everything. Look at Lance Armstrong. His cancer spread to his brain. He not only survived...he won the Tour de France! And how many times?!

You don't think a cure is on the way. Discoveries come out of nowhere. That's what makes medicine so exciting. I have a friend who had leukemia. She had a stem cell transplant 8 years ago and is fine. Not that long ago, this disease was an automatic death sentence. If you look at the research for CF, there are lots of promising new drugs. So believe anything is possible -- it's not outside of the realm of possibility. Instead of focusing on the scary things that may or may not happen in the future --Try the Zen philosophy, living in the moment. Make the most of now.

You obviously have achieved a lot already. Even with dealing with a serious illness and the enormous time contraints of CF treatments, you have managed to build a career AND go to school. Wow. People without your problem have achieved so much less. Now it's time to go after your dream. How do you know that it will never make you any money? And besides, you don't have to have only one source of income. With the internet and some investments, there are other ways to make money.

And as far as your health goes, is there anything else that is within your power to improve your health? I can tell you that when I was on a fast decline 11 years ago, I made a decision to pull myself back from hell. I was having one infection after another (including pseudomonas, staph, MAC, hemophilus, etc.) complete drug resistance, as low as 32% FEV1 -- and I looked for and found a doctor who helped me change the course of my disease. And I'm constantly looking and finding things to keep myself as healthy as I possibly can. So you don't have to be a sitting duck, counting off the days until 10 years as you have figured.

Don't waste your life doing something that is not making you happy. Do something that makes your heart sing. Otherwise life is pointless.

Nightwriter
10-20-2008, 03:44 AM
Follow your heart's desire. Whether you are here for a day or ten years or beyond. You've picked out a number of 10 years. People break doctors' expectations all the time-- sheer will can change everything. Look at Lance Armstrong. His cancer spread to his brain. He not only survived...he won the Tour de France! And how many times?!

You don't think a cure is on the way. Discoveries come out of nowhere. That's what makes medicine so exciting. I have a friend who had leukemia. She had a stem cell transplant 8 years ago and is fine. Not that long ago, this disease was an automatic death sentence. If you look at the research for CF, there are lots of promising new drugs. So believe anything is possible -- it's not outside of the realm of possibility. Instead of focusing on the scary things that may or may not happen in the future --Try the Zen philosophy, living in the moment. Make the most of now.

You obviously have achieved a lot already. Even with dealing with a serious illness and the enormous time contraints of CF treatments, you have managed to build a career AND go to school. Wow. People without your problem have achieved so much less. Now it's time to go after your dream. How do you know that it will never make you any money? And besides, you don't have to have only one source of income. With the internet and some investments, there are other ways to make money.

And as far as your health goes, is there anything else that is within your power to improve your health? I can tell you that when I was on a fast decline 11 years ago, I made a decision to pull myself back from hell. I was having one infection after another (including pseudomonas, staph, MAC, hemophilus, etc.) complete drug resistance, as low as 32% FEV1 -- and I looked for and found a doctor who helped me change the course of my disease. And I'm constantly looking and finding things to keep myself as healthy as I possibly can. So you don't have to be a sitting duck, counting off the days until 10 years as you have figured.

Don't waste your life doing something that is not making you happy. Do something that makes your heart sing. Otherwise life is pointless.

Nightwriter
10-20-2008, 03:44 AM
Follow your heart's desire. Whether you are here for a day or ten years or beyond. You've picked out a number of 10 years. People break doctors' expectations all the time-- sheer will can change everything. Look at Lance Armstrong. His cancer spread to his brain. He not only survived...he won the Tour de France! And how many times?!

You don't think a cure is on the way. Discoveries come out of nowhere. That's what makes medicine so exciting. I have a friend who had leukemia. She had a stem cell transplant 8 years ago and is fine. Not that long ago, this disease was an automatic death sentence. If you look at the research for CF, there are lots of promising new drugs. So believe anything is possible -- it's not outside of the realm of possibility. Instead of focusing on the scary things that may or may not happen in the future --Try the Zen philosophy, living in the moment. Make the most of now.

You obviously have achieved a lot already. Even with dealing with a serious illness and the enormous time contraints of CF treatments, you have managed to build a career AND go to school. Wow. People without your problem have achieved so much less. Now it's time to go after your dream. How do you know that it will never make you any money? And besides, you don't have to have only one source of income. With the internet and some investments, there are other ways to make money.

And as far as your health goes, is there anything else that is within your power to improve your health? I can tell you that when I was on a fast decline 11 years ago, I made a decision to pull myself back from hell. I was having one infection after another (including pseudomonas, staph, MAC, hemophilus, etc.) complete drug resistance, as low as 32% FEV1 -- and I looked for and found a doctor who helped me change the course of my disease. And I'm constantly looking and finding things to keep myself as healthy as I possibly can. So you don't have to be a sitting duck, counting off the days until 10 years as you have figured.

Don't waste your life doing something that is not making you happy. Do something that makes your heart sing. Otherwise life is pointless.

Nightwriter
10-20-2008, 03:44 AM
Follow your heart's desire. Whether you are here for a day or ten years or beyond. You've picked out a number of 10 years. People break doctors' expectations all the time-- sheer will can change everything. Look at Lance Armstrong. His cancer spread to his brain. He not only survived...he won the Tour de France! And how many times?!

You don't think a cure is on the way. Discoveries come out of nowhere. That's what makes medicine so exciting. I have a friend who had leukemia. She had a stem cell transplant 8 years ago and is fine. Not that long ago, this disease was an automatic death sentence. If you look at the research for CF, there are lots of promising new drugs. So believe anything is possible -- it's not outside of the realm of possibility. Instead of focusing on the scary things that may or may not happen in the future --Try the Zen philosophy, living in the moment. Make the most of now.

You obviously have achieved a lot already. Even with dealing with a serious illness and the enormous time contraints of CF treatments, you have managed to build a career AND go to school. Wow. People without your problem have achieved so much less. Now it's time to go after your dream. How do you know that it will never make you any money? And besides, you don't have to have only one source of income. With the internet and some investments, there are other ways to make money.

And as far as your health goes, is there anything else that is within your power to improve your health? I can tell you that when I was on a fast decline 11 years ago, I made a decision to pull myself back from hell. I was having one infection after another (including pseudomonas, staph, MAC, hemophilus, etc.) complete drug resistance, as low as 32% FEV1 -- and I looked for and found a doctor who helped me change the course of my disease. And I'm constantly looking and finding things to keep myself as healthy as I possibly can. So you don't have to be a sitting duck, counting off the days until 10 years as you have figured.

Don't waste your life doing something that is not making you happy. Do something that makes your heart sing. Otherwise life is pointless.

Nightwriter
10-20-2008, 03:44 AM
Follow your heart's desire. Whether you are here for a day or ten years or beyond. You've picked out a number of 10 years. People break doctors' expectations all the time-- sheer will can change everything. Look at Lance Armstrong. His cancer spread to his brain. He not only survived...he won the Tour de France! And how many times?!
<br />
<br />You don't think a cure is on the way. Discoveries come out of nowhere. That's what makes medicine so exciting. I have a friend who had leukemia. She had a stem cell transplant 8 years ago and is fine. Not that long ago, this disease was an automatic death sentence. If you look at the research for CF, there are lots of promising new drugs. So believe anything is possible -- it's not outside of the realm of possibility. Instead of focusing on the scary things that may or may not happen in the future --Try the Zen philosophy, living in the moment. Make the most of now.
<br />
<br />You obviously have achieved a lot already. Even with dealing with a serious illness and the enormous time contraints of CF treatments, you have managed to build a career AND go to school. Wow. People without your problem have achieved so much less. Now it's time to go after your dream. How do you know that it will never make you any money? And besides, you don't have to have only one source of income. With the internet and some investments, there are other ways to make money.
<br />
<br />And as far as your health goes, is there anything else that is within your power to improve your health? I can tell you that when I was on a fast decline 11 years ago, I made a decision to pull myself back from hell. I was having one infection after another (including pseudomonas, staph, MAC, hemophilus, etc.) complete drug resistance, as low as 32% FEV1 -- and I looked for and found a doctor who helped me change the course of my disease. And I'm constantly looking and finding things to keep myself as healthy as I possibly can. So you don't have to be a sitting duck, counting off the days until 10 years as you have figured.
<br />
<br />Don't waste your life doing something that is not making you happy. Do something that makes your heart sing. Otherwise life is pointless.

theDUDE
10-20-2008, 05:13 AM
how do you know you only have 10 years left? (did i miss something)

theDUDE
10-20-2008, 05:13 AM
how do you know you only have 10 years left? (did i miss something)

theDUDE
10-20-2008, 05:13 AM
how do you know you only have 10 years left? (did i miss something)

theDUDE
10-20-2008, 05:13 AM
how do you know you only have 10 years left? (did i miss something)

theDUDE
10-20-2008, 05:13 AM
how do you know you only have 10 years left? (did i miss something)

just1more
10-20-2008, 10:41 AM
While I may not be there myself, my wife & I had this discussion recently after being told that our 6 yr old son is going to need a liver in a 'few' years and is most likely not a tx candidate (due to other medical issues/surgeries).

Whether you have 6 months, 10 years or 50 years, enjoy your time here. Given the option I would rather be poor and happy than be comfortable and miserable. Now you can't go live in a convent w/o any money or medical treatment so I hope that is not your dream.

However, at the same time if your current path includes 80hr work weeks and no time to enjoy the seasons and flowers; then maybe you might want to think about what you are trying to achieve.

If I died today I know that I would regret the time and energy that I have given my career vs my family. I'm actively trying to change that fact as I type this.

So I guess if you feel you have come to a crossroad then look at where you have been and decide if you could be content knowing that was your life; if not then don't be afraid to change things.

just1more
10-20-2008, 10:41 AM
While I may not be there myself, my wife & I had this discussion recently after being told that our 6 yr old son is going to need a liver in a 'few' years and is most likely not a tx candidate (due to other medical issues/surgeries).

Whether you have 6 months, 10 years or 50 years, enjoy your time here. Given the option I would rather be poor and happy than be comfortable and miserable. Now you can't go live in a convent w/o any money or medical treatment so I hope that is not your dream.

However, at the same time if your current path includes 80hr work weeks and no time to enjoy the seasons and flowers; then maybe you might want to think about what you are trying to achieve.

If I died today I know that I would regret the time and energy that I have given my career vs my family. I'm actively trying to change that fact as I type this.

So I guess if you feel you have come to a crossroad then look at where you have been and decide if you could be content knowing that was your life; if not then don't be afraid to change things.

just1more
10-20-2008, 10:41 AM
While I may not be there myself, my wife & I had this discussion recently after being told that our 6 yr old son is going to need a liver in a 'few' years and is most likely not a tx candidate (due to other medical issues/surgeries).

Whether you have 6 months, 10 years or 50 years, enjoy your time here. Given the option I would rather be poor and happy than be comfortable and miserable. Now you can't go live in a convent w/o any money or medical treatment so I hope that is not your dream.

However, at the same time if your current path includes 80hr work weeks and no time to enjoy the seasons and flowers; then maybe you might want to think about what you are trying to achieve.

If I died today I know that I would regret the time and energy that I have given my career vs my family. I'm actively trying to change that fact as I type this.

So I guess if you feel you have come to a crossroad then look at where you have been and decide if you could be content knowing that was your life; if not then don't be afraid to change things.

just1more
10-20-2008, 10:41 AM
While I may not be there myself, my wife & I had this discussion recently after being told that our 6 yr old son is going to need a liver in a 'few' years and is most likely not a tx candidate (due to other medical issues/surgeries).

Whether you have 6 months, 10 years or 50 years, enjoy your time here. Given the option I would rather be poor and happy than be comfortable and miserable. Now you can't go live in a convent w/o any money or medical treatment so I hope that is not your dream.

However, at the same time if your current path includes 80hr work weeks and no time to enjoy the seasons and flowers; then maybe you might want to think about what you are trying to achieve.

If I died today I know that I would regret the time and energy that I have given my career vs my family. I'm actively trying to change that fact as I type this.

So I guess if you feel you have come to a crossroad then look at where you have been and decide if you could be content knowing that was your life; if not then don't be afraid to change things.

just1more
10-20-2008, 10:41 AM
While I may not be there myself, my wife & I had this discussion recently after being told that our 6 yr old son is going to need a liver in a 'few' years and is most likely not a tx candidate (due to other medical issues/surgeries).
<br />
<br />Whether you have 6 months, 10 years or 50 years, enjoy your time here. Given the option I would rather be poor and happy than be comfortable and miserable. Now you can't go live in a convent w/o any money or medical treatment so I hope that is not your dream.
<br />
<br />However, at the same time if your current path includes 80hr work weeks and no time to enjoy the seasons and flowers; then maybe you might want to think about what you are trying to achieve.
<br />
<br />If I died today I know that I would regret the time and energy that I have given my career vs my family. I'm actively trying to change that fact as I type this.
<br />
<br />So I guess if you feel you have come to a crossroad then look at where you have been and decide if you could be content knowing that was your life; if not then don't be afraid to change things.
<br />

mabusincarnate
10-20-2008, 12:54 PM
Obviously there is no way to definitively know how long you have. I'm 25 and we all know the statistics. My FEV1 is around 51% and it's been as low as 25% this year while I was in the joint. 10 years is my reasonable estimate of how many good comfortable years I have left.

I wanted to be a quantitative analyst for an investment group. I'm good at building math models of financial theory. I've been playing all the political games required to get my foot in the door. I'm a systems analyst at NASA right now. I got a fist full of recommendation letters from all levels of management and college professors. Why?? I would be working 60-65 hours per week. There's no way I could handle that. I can barely do it now. And most importantly, do I want to spend the last few years of my life making huge profits for someone else? The job pays well but at a HUGE sacrifice.

I have a great title and a good paycheck. What good is any of that if I don't want to get out of bed in the morning? I'm not going to spend the last few years of my life dreading the day.

This started last night while I was working some accounting problems. I realized how much I hate accounting. It's not something I can see myself doing ... ever. So, I'm dropping the class today after lunch. I already have more accounting hours than I need.

More importantly, I'm quitting my job. I have my wife's support. She has her reservations but she understands. We can live middle class on her salary.

I'm looking for something fulfilling now. I need to bring in some money but not much. I would love to be a tutor for inner city kids. I learned to manage dyslexia, came from a broken home, and grew up sick. I have a lot to offer troubled kids. Another option is working at the rock gym. I love climbing and it would keep me healthy.

mabusincarnate
10-20-2008, 12:54 PM
Obviously there is no way to definitively know how long you have. I'm 25 and we all know the statistics. My FEV1 is around 51% and it's been as low as 25% this year while I was in the joint. 10 years is my reasonable estimate of how many good comfortable years I have left.

I wanted to be a quantitative analyst for an investment group. I'm good at building math models of financial theory. I've been playing all the political games required to get my foot in the door. I'm a systems analyst at NASA right now. I got a fist full of recommendation letters from all levels of management and college professors. Why?? I would be working 60-65 hours per week. There's no way I could handle that. I can barely do it now. And most importantly, do I want to spend the last few years of my life making huge profits for someone else? The job pays well but at a HUGE sacrifice.

I have a great title and a good paycheck. What good is any of that if I don't want to get out of bed in the morning? I'm not going to spend the last few years of my life dreading the day.

This started last night while I was working some accounting problems. I realized how much I hate accounting. It's not something I can see myself doing ... ever. So, I'm dropping the class today after lunch. I already have more accounting hours than I need.

More importantly, I'm quitting my job. I have my wife's support. She has her reservations but she understands. We can live middle class on her salary.

I'm looking for something fulfilling now. I need to bring in some money but not much. I would love to be a tutor for inner city kids. I learned to manage dyslexia, came from a broken home, and grew up sick. I have a lot to offer troubled kids. Another option is working at the rock gym. I love climbing and it would keep me healthy.

mabusincarnate
10-20-2008, 12:54 PM
Obviously there is no way to definitively know how long you have. I'm 25 and we all know the statistics. My FEV1 is around 51% and it's been as low as 25% this year while I was in the joint. 10 years is my reasonable estimate of how many good comfortable years I have left.

I wanted to be a quantitative analyst for an investment group. I'm good at building math models of financial theory. I've been playing all the political games required to get my foot in the door. I'm a systems analyst at NASA right now. I got a fist full of recommendation letters from all levels of management and college professors. Why?? I would be working 60-65 hours per week. There's no way I could handle that. I can barely do it now. And most importantly, do I want to spend the last few years of my life making huge profits for someone else? The job pays well but at a HUGE sacrifice.

I have a great title and a good paycheck. What good is any of that if I don't want to get out of bed in the morning? I'm not going to spend the last few years of my life dreading the day.

This started last night while I was working some accounting problems. I realized how much I hate accounting. It's not something I can see myself doing ... ever. So, I'm dropping the class today after lunch. I already have more accounting hours than I need.

More importantly, I'm quitting my job. I have my wife's support. She has her reservations but she understands. We can live middle class on her salary.

I'm looking for something fulfilling now. I need to bring in some money but not much. I would love to be a tutor for inner city kids. I learned to manage dyslexia, came from a broken home, and grew up sick. I have a lot to offer troubled kids. Another option is working at the rock gym. I love climbing and it would keep me healthy.

mabusincarnate
10-20-2008, 12:54 PM
Obviously there is no way to definitively know how long you have. I'm 25 and we all know the statistics. My FEV1 is around 51% and it's been as low as 25% this year while I was in the joint. 10 years is my reasonable estimate of how many good comfortable years I have left.

I wanted to be a quantitative analyst for an investment group. I'm good at building math models of financial theory. I've been playing all the political games required to get my foot in the door. I'm a systems analyst at NASA right now. I got a fist full of recommendation letters from all levels of management and college professors. Why?? I would be working 60-65 hours per week. There's no way I could handle that. I can barely do it now. And most importantly, do I want to spend the last few years of my life making huge profits for someone else? The job pays well but at a HUGE sacrifice.

I have a great title and a good paycheck. What good is any of that if I don't want to get out of bed in the morning? I'm not going to spend the last few years of my life dreading the day.

This started last night while I was working some accounting problems. I realized how much I hate accounting. It's not something I can see myself doing ... ever. So, I'm dropping the class today after lunch. I already have more accounting hours than I need.

More importantly, I'm quitting my job. I have my wife's support. She has her reservations but she understands. We can live middle class on her salary.

I'm looking for something fulfilling now. I need to bring in some money but not much. I would love to be a tutor for inner city kids. I learned to manage dyslexia, came from a broken home, and grew up sick. I have a lot to offer troubled kids. Another option is working at the rock gym. I love climbing and it would keep me healthy.

mabusincarnate
10-20-2008, 12:54 PM
Obviously there is no way to definitively know how long you have. I'm 25 and we all know the statistics. My FEV1 is around 51% and it's been as low as 25% this year while I was in the joint. 10 years is my reasonable estimate of how many good comfortable years I have left.
<br />
<br />I wanted to be a quantitative analyst for an investment group. I'm good at building math models of financial theory. I've been playing all the political games required to get my foot in the door. I'm a systems analyst at NASA right now. I got a fist full of recommendation letters from all levels of management and college professors. Why?? I would be working 60-65 hours per week. There's no way I could handle that. I can barely do it now. And most importantly, do I want to spend the last few years of my life making huge profits for someone else? The job pays well but at a HUGE sacrifice.
<br />
<br />I have a great title and a good paycheck. What good is any of that if I don't want to get out of bed in the morning? I'm not going to spend the last few years of my life dreading the day.
<br />
<br />This started last night while I was working some accounting problems. I realized how much I hate accounting. It's not something I can see myself doing ... ever. So, I'm dropping the class today after lunch. I already have more accounting hours than I need.
<br />
<br />More importantly, I'm quitting my job. I have my wife's support. She has her reservations but she understands. We can live middle class on her salary.
<br />
<br />I'm looking for something fulfilling now. I need to bring in some money but not much. I would love to be a tutor for inner city kids. I learned to manage dyslexia, came from a broken home, and grew up sick. I have a lot to offer troubled kids. Another option is working at the rock gym. I love climbing and it would keep me healthy.

just1more
10-20-2008, 01:18 PM
I just want to say that I am happy that you are in a position to make these changes, and have a supportive wife.

I wish you all the best.

just1more
10-20-2008, 01:18 PM
I just want to say that I am happy that you are in a position to make these changes, and have a supportive wife.

I wish you all the best.

just1more
10-20-2008, 01:18 PM
I just want to say that I am happy that you are in a position to make these changes, and have a supportive wife.

I wish you all the best.

just1more
10-20-2008, 01:18 PM
I just want to say that I am happy that you are in a position to make these changes, and have a supportive wife.

I wish you all the best.

just1more
10-20-2008, 01:18 PM
I just want to say that I am happy that you are in a position to make these changes, and have a supportive wife.
<br />
<br />I wish you all the best.

Nervous1
10-20-2008, 01:28 PM
Wow, this post really hits home for me. I have been having very similar thoughts, although my situation is a bit different.

I am the main breadwinner in my family and I have a husband and 3 kids. While my husband has a job, it pays far less than mine. The intellectual parts of my job I enjoy, but the politics and travel I do not. Unfortunately the job requires quite a bit of both, and it requires very long hours. Completely healthy people are shocked when they hear what my average day is like.

On the one hand, the intellectual stimulation and interaction with colleagues keeps me from getting depressed about my health situation. On the other hand it's clear to me that the stress, travel and hours are impacting my health.

I was seriously considering asking for a half time position. This would be a huge career gamble, but I have been feeling really sick the last few months. With the current economic situation it's unfortunately no longer even an option to be considered. Half timers are always the first to be let go when companies start cutting back. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-sad.gif" border="0">

In short, if you can swing it financially I agree with the others. Do what makes you happy!

-----------------------
40+ w/bronchiectasis & chronic sinusitis

Nervous1
10-20-2008, 01:28 PM
Wow, this post really hits home for me. I have been having very similar thoughts, although my situation is a bit different.

I am the main breadwinner in my family and I have a husband and 3 kids. While my husband has a job, it pays far less than mine. The intellectual parts of my job I enjoy, but the politics and travel I do not. Unfortunately the job requires quite a bit of both, and it requires very long hours. Completely healthy people are shocked when they hear what my average day is like.

On the one hand, the intellectual stimulation and interaction with colleagues keeps me from getting depressed about my health situation. On the other hand it's clear to me that the stress, travel and hours are impacting my health.

I was seriously considering asking for a half time position. This would be a huge career gamble, but I have been feeling really sick the last few months. With the current economic situation it's unfortunately no longer even an option to be considered. Half timers are always the first to be let go when companies start cutting back. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-sad.gif" border="0">

In short, if you can swing it financially I agree with the others. Do what makes you happy!

-----------------------
40+ w/bronchiectasis & chronic sinusitis

Nervous1
10-20-2008, 01:28 PM
Wow, this post really hits home for me. I have been having very similar thoughts, although my situation is a bit different.

I am the main breadwinner in my family and I have a husband and 3 kids. While my husband has a job, it pays far less than mine. The intellectual parts of my job I enjoy, but the politics and travel I do not. Unfortunately the job requires quite a bit of both, and it requires very long hours. Completely healthy people are shocked when they hear what my average day is like.

On the one hand, the intellectual stimulation and interaction with colleagues keeps me from getting depressed about my health situation. On the other hand it's clear to me that the stress, travel and hours are impacting my health.

I was seriously considering asking for a half time position. This would be a huge career gamble, but I have been feeling really sick the last few months. With the current economic situation it's unfortunately no longer even an option to be considered. Half timers are always the first to be let go when companies start cutting back. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-sad.gif" border="0">

In short, if you can swing it financially I agree with the others. Do what makes you happy!

-----------------------
40+ w/bronchiectasis & chronic sinusitis

Nervous1
10-20-2008, 01:28 PM
Wow, this post really hits home for me. I have been having very similar thoughts, although my situation is a bit different.

I am the main breadwinner in my family and I have a husband and 3 kids. While my husband has a job, it pays far less than mine. The intellectual parts of my job I enjoy, but the politics and travel I do not. Unfortunately the job requires quite a bit of both, and it requires very long hours. Completely healthy people are shocked when they hear what my average day is like.

On the one hand, the intellectual stimulation and interaction with colleagues keeps me from getting depressed about my health situation. On the other hand it's clear to me that the stress, travel and hours are impacting my health.

I was seriously considering asking for a half time position. This would be a huge career gamble, but I have been feeling really sick the last few months. With the current economic situation it's unfortunately no longer even an option to be considered. Half timers are always the first to be let go when companies start cutting back. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-sad.gif" border="0">

In short, if you can swing it financially I agree with the others. Do what makes you happy!

-----------------------
40+ w/bronchiectasis & chronic sinusitis

Nervous1
10-20-2008, 01:28 PM
Wow, this post really hits home for me. I have been having very similar thoughts, although my situation is a bit different.
<br />
<br />I am the main breadwinner in my family and I have a husband and 3 kids. While my husband has a job, it pays far less than mine. The intellectual parts of my job I enjoy, but the politics and travel I do not. Unfortunately the job requires quite a bit of both, and it requires very long hours. Completely healthy people are shocked when they hear what my average day is like.
<br />
<br />On the one hand, the intellectual stimulation and interaction with colleagues keeps me from getting depressed about my health situation. On the other hand it's clear to me that the stress, travel and hours are impacting my health.
<br />
<br />I was seriously considering asking for a half time position. This would be a huge career gamble, but I have been feeling really sick the last few months. With the current economic situation it's unfortunately no longer even an option to be considered. Half timers are always the first to be let go when companies start cutting back. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-sad.gif" border="0">
<br />
<br />In short, if you can swing it financially I agree with the others. Do what makes you happy!
<br />
<br />-----------------------
<br />40+ w/bronchiectasis & chronic sinusitis

lmattaway
10-20-2008, 04:21 PM
I struggle with this idea now and again. Some days I want to just drop everything and go travel the world. But in reality, my husband has just as much of a "right" to quit is job for something he loves as I do, CF or no CF. Yes, the statistics may say I'm going to go first, but we don't know that for sure. The key is to finding a balance where you BOTH feel like you're getting what you want out of life.

And maybe for those of us who aren't in a position to quit our jobs or reduce our hours, volunteering for something worthwhile can give us that "value" we're looking for. I found I was much more content with my 'day job' when I was giving of my time in other areas (on the weekends, evenings etc). Even if it is only once a month, it's still making a difference somewhere, which makes me feel good.

Now, when your health starts to decline b/c you're working too many hours, well that's another matter... and let's all pray we have people around us to support us when those times come!

lmattaway
10-20-2008, 04:21 PM
I struggle with this idea now and again. Some days I want to just drop everything and go travel the world. But in reality, my husband has just as much of a "right" to quit is job for something he loves as I do, CF or no CF. Yes, the statistics may say I'm going to go first, but we don't know that for sure. The key is to finding a balance where you BOTH feel like you're getting what you want out of life.

And maybe for those of us who aren't in a position to quit our jobs or reduce our hours, volunteering for something worthwhile can give us that "value" we're looking for. I found I was much more content with my 'day job' when I was giving of my time in other areas (on the weekends, evenings etc). Even if it is only once a month, it's still making a difference somewhere, which makes me feel good.

Now, when your health starts to decline b/c you're working too many hours, well that's another matter... and let's all pray we have people around us to support us when those times come!

lmattaway
10-20-2008, 04:21 PM
I struggle with this idea now and again. Some days I want to just drop everything and go travel the world. But in reality, my husband has just as much of a "right" to quit is job for something he loves as I do, CF or no CF. Yes, the statistics may say I'm going to go first, but we don't know that for sure. The key is to finding a balance where you BOTH feel like you're getting what you want out of life.

And maybe for those of us who aren't in a position to quit our jobs or reduce our hours, volunteering for something worthwhile can give us that "value" we're looking for. I found I was much more content with my 'day job' when I was giving of my time in other areas (on the weekends, evenings etc). Even if it is only once a month, it's still making a difference somewhere, which makes me feel good.

Now, when your health starts to decline b/c you're working too many hours, well that's another matter... and let's all pray we have people around us to support us when those times come!

lmattaway
10-20-2008, 04:21 PM
I struggle with this idea now and again. Some days I want to just drop everything and go travel the world. But in reality, my husband has just as much of a "right" to quit is job for something he loves as I do, CF or no CF. Yes, the statistics may say I'm going to go first, but we don't know that for sure. The key is to finding a balance where you BOTH feel like you're getting what you want out of life.

And maybe for those of us who aren't in a position to quit our jobs or reduce our hours, volunteering for something worthwhile can give us that "value" we're looking for. I found I was much more content with my 'day job' when I was giving of my time in other areas (on the weekends, evenings etc). Even if it is only once a month, it's still making a difference somewhere, which makes me feel good.

Now, when your health starts to decline b/c you're working too many hours, well that's another matter... and let's all pray we have people around us to support us when those times come!

lmattaway
10-20-2008, 04:21 PM
I struggle with this idea now and again. Some days I want to just drop everything and go travel the world. But in reality, my husband has just as much of a "right" to quit is job for something he loves as I do, CF or no CF. Yes, the statistics may say I'm going to go first, but we don't know that for sure. The key is to finding a balance where you BOTH feel like you're getting what you want out of life.
<br />
<br />And maybe for those of us who aren't in a position to quit our jobs or reduce our hours, volunteering for something worthwhile can give us that "value" we're looking for. I found I was much more content with my 'day job' when I was giving of my time in other areas (on the weekends, evenings etc). Even if it is only once a month, it's still making a difference somewhere, which makes me feel good.
<br />
<br />Now, when your health starts to decline b/c you're working too many hours, well that's another matter... and let's all pray we have people around us to support us when those times come!

Diane
10-20-2008, 04:52 PM
Well, i can only tell you what i did when i thought i only had 2 years left. When i was diagnosed with cepacia almost 12 years ago i didnt know anything about it at all. i read something that mentioned a 2 year limit, so i figured that was all i had left. I was devastated at first and tried to prepare myself, my fanily and my friends. I also did dome soul searching and realized that i can go out of my mind, go nuts, Cry forever, plead forever, make every promise in the world, do this do that,fight like heck, but if i am meant to die then i am still going to. I came to a point where i just decided to carry on with my life and do what i do and just take care of myself and do what i had to do.
I was never one to save every penny i had for a "rainy day" because not one person ....healthy or not, is guaranteed a "rainy day" . If i want something and i can aford it now, i will get it now and not waste time. I've seen many healthy people ( sone friends) die from all sorts of different things, believing they had forever to do something they wanted to do and just put it off for later.
I have a muscle car and am in a muscle car club and one day i was talking to the one older guy in my club and were discussing why i dont "wrap up" my car for the winter. MOst people with muscle cars cover their car after car show season ( this timne of year) shove them in a garage and not touch them till spring. I dont ever do that and never will.
I told him that i built it to be enjoyed and i will enjoy it as often as i can despite the weather. Obviously if it is raining or snowing i dont drive the car for safety issues.
I told him no-one is guaranteed another spring and what a waste it would be for you to store the car for the winter WISHING you could be enjoying it, and then something happens and you die. You wasted all those months WISHING you could be enjoying the car when you actually could have BEEN enjoying the car, but you were taking for granted you had another spring to do that.
It seems like most people live their lives like they have the rest of their lives to do it, and sadly some dont. You gotta do what makes you happy while you are here

Diane
10-20-2008, 04:52 PM
Well, i can only tell you what i did when i thought i only had 2 years left. When i was diagnosed with cepacia almost 12 years ago i didnt know anything about it at all. i read something that mentioned a 2 year limit, so i figured that was all i had left. I was devastated at first and tried to prepare myself, my fanily and my friends. I also did dome soul searching and realized that i can go out of my mind, go nuts, Cry forever, plead forever, make every promise in the world, do this do that,fight like heck, but if i am meant to die then i am still going to. I came to a point where i just decided to carry on with my life and do what i do and just take care of myself and do what i had to do.
I was never one to save every penny i had for a "rainy day" because not one person ....healthy or not, is guaranteed a "rainy day" . If i want something and i can aford it now, i will get it now and not waste time. I've seen many healthy people ( sone friends) die from all sorts of different things, believing they had forever to do something they wanted to do and just put it off for later.
I have a muscle car and am in a muscle car club and one day i was talking to the one older guy in my club and were discussing why i dont "wrap up" my car for the winter. MOst people with muscle cars cover their car after car show season ( this timne of year) shove them in a garage and not touch them till spring. I dont ever do that and never will.
I told him that i built it to be enjoyed and i will enjoy it as often as i can despite the weather. Obviously if it is raining or snowing i dont drive the car for safety issues.
I told him no-one is guaranteed another spring and what a waste it would be for you to store the car for the winter WISHING you could be enjoying it, and then something happens and you die. You wasted all those months WISHING you could be enjoying the car when you actually could have BEEN enjoying the car, but you were taking for granted you had another spring to do that.
It seems like most people live their lives like they have the rest of their lives to do it, and sadly some dont. You gotta do what makes you happy while you are here

Diane
10-20-2008, 04:52 PM
Well, i can only tell you what i did when i thought i only had 2 years left. When i was diagnosed with cepacia almost 12 years ago i didnt know anything about it at all. i read something that mentioned a 2 year limit, so i figured that was all i had left. I was devastated at first and tried to prepare myself, my fanily and my friends. I also did dome soul searching and realized that i can go out of my mind, go nuts, Cry forever, plead forever, make every promise in the world, do this do that,fight like heck, but if i am meant to die then i am still going to. I came to a point where i just decided to carry on with my life and do what i do and just take care of myself and do what i had to do.
I was never one to save every penny i had for a "rainy day" because not one person ....healthy or not, is guaranteed a "rainy day" . If i want something and i can aford it now, i will get it now and not waste time. I've seen many healthy people ( sone friends) die from all sorts of different things, believing they had forever to do something they wanted to do and just put it off for later.
I have a muscle car and am in a muscle car club and one day i was talking to the one older guy in my club and were discussing why i dont "wrap up" my car for the winter. MOst people with muscle cars cover their car after car show season ( this timne of year) shove them in a garage and not touch them till spring. I dont ever do that and never will.
I told him that i built it to be enjoyed and i will enjoy it as often as i can despite the weather. Obviously if it is raining or snowing i dont drive the car for safety issues.
I told him no-one is guaranteed another spring and what a waste it would be for you to store the car for the winter WISHING you could be enjoying it, and then something happens and you die. You wasted all those months WISHING you could be enjoying the car when you actually could have BEEN enjoying the car, but you were taking for granted you had another spring to do that.
It seems like most people live their lives like they have the rest of their lives to do it, and sadly some dont. You gotta do what makes you happy while you are here

Diane
10-20-2008, 04:52 PM
Well, i can only tell you what i did when i thought i only had 2 years left. When i was diagnosed with cepacia almost 12 years ago i didnt know anything about it at all. i read something that mentioned a 2 year limit, so i figured that was all i had left. I was devastated at first and tried to prepare myself, my fanily and my friends. I also did dome soul searching and realized that i can go out of my mind, go nuts, Cry forever, plead forever, make every promise in the world, do this do that,fight like heck, but if i am meant to die then i am still going to. I came to a point where i just decided to carry on with my life and do what i do and just take care of myself and do what i had to do.
I was never one to save every penny i had for a "rainy day" because not one person ....healthy or not, is guaranteed a "rainy day" . If i want something and i can aford it now, i will get it now and not waste time. I've seen many healthy people ( sone friends) die from all sorts of different things, believing they had forever to do something they wanted to do and just put it off for later.
I have a muscle car and am in a muscle car club and one day i was talking to the one older guy in my club and were discussing why i dont "wrap up" my car for the winter. MOst people with muscle cars cover their car after car show season ( this timne of year) shove them in a garage and not touch them till spring. I dont ever do that and never will.
I told him that i built it to be enjoyed and i will enjoy it as often as i can despite the weather. Obviously if it is raining or snowing i dont drive the car for safety issues.
I told him no-one is guaranteed another spring and what a waste it would be for you to store the car for the winter WISHING you could be enjoying it, and then something happens and you die. You wasted all those months WISHING you could be enjoying the car when you actually could have BEEN enjoying the car, but you were taking for granted you had another spring to do that.
It seems like most people live their lives like they have the rest of their lives to do it, and sadly some dont. You gotta do what makes you happy while you are here

Diane
10-20-2008, 04:52 PM
Well, i can only tell you what i did when i thought i only had 2 years left. When i was diagnosed with cepacia almost 12 years ago i didnt know anything about it at all. i read something that mentioned a 2 year limit, so i figured that was all i had left. I was devastated at first and tried to prepare myself, my fanily and my friends. I also did dome soul searching and realized that i can go out of my mind, go nuts, Cry forever, plead forever, make every promise in the world, do this do that,fight like heck, but if i am meant to die then i am still going to. I came to a point where i just decided to carry on with my life and do what i do and just take care of myself and do what i had to do.
<br />I was never one to save every penny i had for a "rainy day" because not one person ....healthy or not, is guaranteed a "rainy day" . If i want something and i can aford it now, i will get it now and not waste time. I've seen many healthy people ( sone friends) die from all sorts of different things, believing they had forever to do something they wanted to do and just put it off for later.
<br /> I have a muscle car and am in a muscle car club and one day i was talking to the one older guy in my club and were discussing why i dont "wrap up" my car for the winter. MOst people with muscle cars cover their car after car show season ( this timne of year) shove them in a garage and not touch them till spring. I dont ever do that and never will.
<br />I told him that i built it to be enjoyed and i will enjoy it as often as i can despite the weather. Obviously if it is raining or snowing i dont drive the car for safety issues.
<br /> I told him no-one is guaranteed another spring and what a waste it would be for you to store the car for the winter WISHING you could be enjoying it, and then something happens and you die. You wasted all those months WISHING you could be enjoying the car when you actually could have BEEN enjoying the car, but you were taking for granted you had another spring to do that.
<br />It seems like most people live their lives like they have the rest of their lives to do it, and sadly some dont. You gotta do what makes you happy while you are here
<br />

Lex
10-20-2008, 05:49 PM
Cf's silver lining....

....it reminds us that we will eventually die.

Lex
10-20-2008, 05:49 PM
Cf's silver lining....

....it reminds us that we will eventually die.

Lex
10-20-2008, 05:49 PM
Cf's silver lining....

....it reminds us that we will eventually die.

Lex
10-20-2008, 05:49 PM
Cf's silver lining....

....it reminds us that we will eventually die.

Lex
10-20-2008, 05:49 PM
Cf's silver lining....
<br />
<br />....it reminds us that we will eventually die.

mabusincarnate
10-20-2008, 07:05 PM
One Sunday this past April I was at 60 hours for the week (plus school) finishing up a project. I left the office and had my wife take me to the ER. My sats were in the low 80s, HR in the 130s, and after some scans they found my right lung was collapsing.

The worst part:

I spent 10 days in the hospital from that and I had over 40 hours on my timesheet... from the f'n hospital. Last night I decided enough was enough.

mabusincarnate
10-20-2008, 07:05 PM
One Sunday this past April I was at 60 hours for the week (plus school) finishing up a project. I left the office and had my wife take me to the ER. My sats were in the low 80s, HR in the 130s, and after some scans they found my right lung was collapsing.

The worst part:

I spent 10 days in the hospital from that and I had over 40 hours on my timesheet... from the f'n hospital. Last night I decided enough was enough.

mabusincarnate
10-20-2008, 07:05 PM
One Sunday this past April I was at 60 hours for the week (plus school) finishing up a project. I left the office and had my wife take me to the ER. My sats were in the low 80s, HR in the 130s, and after some scans they found my right lung was collapsing.

The worst part:

I spent 10 days in the hospital from that and I had over 40 hours on my timesheet... from the f'n hospital. Last night I decided enough was enough.

mabusincarnate
10-20-2008, 07:05 PM
One Sunday this past April I was at 60 hours for the week (plus school) finishing up a project. I left the office and had my wife take me to the ER. My sats were in the low 80s, HR in the 130s, and after some scans they found my right lung was collapsing.

The worst part:

I spent 10 days in the hospital from that and I had over 40 hours on my timesheet... from the f'n hospital. Last night I decided enough was enough.

mabusincarnate
10-20-2008, 07:05 PM
One Sunday this past April I was at 60 hours for the week (plus school) finishing up a project. I left the office and had my wife take me to the ER. My sats were in the low 80s, HR in the 130s, and after some scans they found my right lung was collapsing.
<br />
<br />The worst part:
<br />
<br />I spent 10 days in the hospital from that and I had over 40 hours on my timesheet... from the f'n hospital. Last night I decided enough was enough.

kitomd21
10-20-2008, 08:18 PM
I'm coming from the same place in life as I don't have CF, but my daughter does. I often wonder how she'll (we'll) face this issue. Many are able to look at her having CF and say that she'll fight it and do really well, but we just don't know what path she'll go down. That's very difficult. I would hate to have a definitive timeline of when she'll succumb because we would constantly fixate on how much time is left. We are enjoying her and loving her every moment and we're grateful God has given her to us for however long. We'll always encourage her to do what makes her happy.

From a non-CF standpoint, I intended to become a veterinarian...well, priorities changed and I am now a registered veterinary technician. Am I capable and intelligent enough to be a veterinarian? Yes. Were my academic achievements up to the standards of veterinary school admission? Yes. What it came down to is that I wanted a family and didn't want to spend 4+ years beyond obtaining my B.S. I wanted to have children while I was young and energetic enough to keep up with them and then hopefully be around to do the same with their children.

At any rate, I know it's different coming from someone who doesn't have CF, but - PRIORITIES CHANGE. It doesn't have to be related to how much time we have left...really, do what makes you happy. I don't make a lot as an RVT. I could make more as a veterinarian, but I'm happy where I am now and THAT'S OKAY!!!

My thoughts are with you....

kitomd21
10-20-2008, 08:18 PM
I'm coming from the same place in life as I don't have CF, but my daughter does. I often wonder how she'll (we'll) face this issue. Many are able to look at her having CF and say that she'll fight it and do really well, but we just don't know what path she'll go down. That's very difficult. I would hate to have a definitive timeline of when she'll succumb because we would constantly fixate on how much time is left. We are enjoying her and loving her every moment and we're grateful God has given her to us for however long. We'll always encourage her to do what makes her happy.

From a non-CF standpoint, I intended to become a veterinarian...well, priorities changed and I am now a registered veterinary technician. Am I capable and intelligent enough to be a veterinarian? Yes. Were my academic achievements up to the standards of veterinary school admission? Yes. What it came down to is that I wanted a family and didn't want to spend 4+ years beyond obtaining my B.S. I wanted to have children while I was young and energetic enough to keep up with them and then hopefully be around to do the same with their children.

At any rate, I know it's different coming from someone who doesn't have CF, but - PRIORITIES CHANGE. It doesn't have to be related to how much time we have left...really, do what makes you happy. I don't make a lot as an RVT. I could make more as a veterinarian, but I'm happy where I am now and THAT'S OKAY!!!

My thoughts are with you....

kitomd21
10-20-2008, 08:18 PM
I'm coming from the same place in life as I don't have CF, but my daughter does. I often wonder how she'll (we'll) face this issue. Many are able to look at her having CF and say that she'll fight it and do really well, but we just don't know what path she'll go down. That's very difficult. I would hate to have a definitive timeline of when she'll succumb because we would constantly fixate on how much time is left. We are enjoying her and loving her every moment and we're grateful God has given her to us for however long. We'll always encourage her to do what makes her happy.

From a non-CF standpoint, I intended to become a veterinarian...well, priorities changed and I am now a registered veterinary technician. Am I capable and intelligent enough to be a veterinarian? Yes. Were my academic achievements up to the standards of veterinary school admission? Yes. What it came down to is that I wanted a family and didn't want to spend 4+ years beyond obtaining my B.S. I wanted to have children while I was young and energetic enough to keep up with them and then hopefully be around to do the same with their children.

At any rate, I know it's different coming from someone who doesn't have CF, but - PRIORITIES CHANGE. It doesn't have to be related to how much time we have left...really, do what makes you happy. I don't make a lot as an RVT. I could make more as a veterinarian, but I'm happy where I am now and THAT'S OKAY!!!

My thoughts are with you....

kitomd21
10-20-2008, 08:18 PM
I'm coming from the same place in life as I don't have CF, but my daughter does. I often wonder how she'll (we'll) face this issue. Many are able to look at her having CF and say that she'll fight it and do really well, but we just don't know what path she'll go down. That's very difficult. I would hate to have a definitive timeline of when she'll succumb because we would constantly fixate on how much time is left. We are enjoying her and loving her every moment and we're grateful God has given her to us for however long. We'll always encourage her to do what makes her happy.

From a non-CF standpoint, I intended to become a veterinarian...well, priorities changed and I am now a registered veterinary technician. Am I capable and intelligent enough to be a veterinarian? Yes. Were my academic achievements up to the standards of veterinary school admission? Yes. What it came down to is that I wanted a family and didn't want to spend 4+ years beyond obtaining my B.S. I wanted to have children while I was young and energetic enough to keep up with them and then hopefully be around to do the same with their children.

At any rate, I know it's different coming from someone who doesn't have CF, but - PRIORITIES CHANGE. It doesn't have to be related to how much time we have left...really, do what makes you happy. I don't make a lot as an RVT. I could make more as a veterinarian, but I'm happy where I am now and THAT'S OKAY!!!

My thoughts are with you....

kitomd21
10-20-2008, 08:18 PM
I'm coming from the same place in life as I don't have CF, but my daughter does. I often wonder how she'll (we'll) face this issue. Many are able to look at her having CF and say that she'll fight it and do really well, but we just don't know what path she'll go down. That's very difficult. I would hate to have a definitive timeline of when she'll succumb because we would constantly fixate on how much time is left. We are enjoying her and loving her every moment and we're grateful God has given her to us for however long. We'll always encourage her to do what makes her happy.
<br />
<br />From a non-CF standpoint, I intended to become a veterinarian...well, priorities changed and I am now a registered veterinary technician. Am I capable and intelligent enough to be a veterinarian? Yes. Were my academic achievements up to the standards of veterinary school admission? Yes. What it came down to is that I wanted a family and didn't want to spend 4+ years beyond obtaining my B.S. I wanted to have children while I was young and energetic enough to keep up with them and then hopefully be around to do the same with their children.
<br />
<br />At any rate, I know it's different coming from someone who doesn't have CF, but - PRIORITIES CHANGE. It doesn't have to be related to how much time we have left...really, do what makes you happy. I don't make a lot as an RVT. I could make more as a veterinarian, but I'm happy where I am now and THAT'S OKAY!!!
<br />
<br />My thoughts are with you....

Vampy
10-20-2008, 10:04 PM
I would get in with god and pray. Keep doing the treatements and talk to your docs about alternatives like a lung transplant or things that might come from the problem you are facing. Live life and dont be afraid to fly. Life love and laugh each day you wake up in the morning and never forget that you are not alone in your battle my friend. I dont know if your religious but i personally would get close to god. Drs have told me personally that i wouldnt live past 2, i wouldnt be able to have a child...and i believe god has blessed me and i think he might be able to help you too luv. keep us posted
Love
vampy

Vampy
10-20-2008, 10:04 PM
I would get in with god and pray. Keep doing the treatements and talk to your docs about alternatives like a lung transplant or things that might come from the problem you are facing. Live life and dont be afraid to fly. Life love and laugh each day you wake up in the morning and never forget that you are not alone in your battle my friend. I dont know if your religious but i personally would get close to god. Drs have told me personally that i wouldnt live past 2, i wouldnt be able to have a child...and i believe god has blessed me and i think he might be able to help you too luv. keep us posted
Love
vampy

Vampy
10-20-2008, 10:04 PM
I would get in with god and pray. Keep doing the treatements and talk to your docs about alternatives like a lung transplant or things that might come from the problem you are facing. Live life and dont be afraid to fly. Life love and laugh each day you wake up in the morning and never forget that you are not alone in your battle my friend. I dont know if your religious but i personally would get close to god. Drs have told me personally that i wouldnt live past 2, i wouldnt be able to have a child...and i believe god has blessed me and i think he might be able to help you too luv. keep us posted
Love
vampy

Vampy
10-20-2008, 10:04 PM
I would get in with god and pray. Keep doing the treatements and talk to your docs about alternatives like a lung transplant or things that might come from the problem you are facing. Live life and dont be afraid to fly. Life love and laugh each day you wake up in the morning and never forget that you are not alone in your battle my friend. I dont know if your religious but i personally would get close to god. Drs have told me personally that i wouldnt live past 2, i wouldnt be able to have a child...and i believe god has blessed me and i think he might be able to help you too luv. keep us posted
Love
vampy

Vampy
10-20-2008, 10:04 PM
I would get in with god and pray. Keep doing the treatements and talk to your docs about alternatives like a lung transplant or things that might come from the problem you are facing. Live life and dont be afraid to fly. Life love and laugh each day you wake up in the morning and never forget that you are not alone in your battle my friend. I dont know if your religious but i personally would get close to god. Drs have told me personally that i wouldnt live past 2, i wouldnt be able to have a child...and i believe god has blessed me and i think he might be able to help you too luv. keep us posted
<br />Love
<br />vampy

MicheleGazelle
10-21-2008, 01:58 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>Lex</b></i>

Cf's silver lining....



....it reminds us that we will eventually die.</end quote></div>

Another silver lining: Sometimes it's a chance to get taken care of for a legitimate, non-whiny reason even though you are an adult. My sons take care of me a lot. I couldn't hold down a full time job if they didn't. For most of my life, I haven't felt particularly cared for. This has been good for my soul. Being on the receiving end instead of the giving end for a change has been a growth experience for me.

MicheleGazelle
10-21-2008, 01:58 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>Lex</b></i>

Cf's silver lining....



....it reminds us that we will eventually die.</end quote></div>

Another silver lining: Sometimes it's a chance to get taken care of for a legitimate, non-whiny reason even though you are an adult. My sons take care of me a lot. I couldn't hold down a full time job if they didn't. For most of my life, I haven't felt particularly cared for. This has been good for my soul. Being on the receiving end instead of the giving end for a change has been a growth experience for me.

MicheleGazelle
10-21-2008, 01:58 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>Lex</b></i>

Cf's silver lining....



....it reminds us that we will eventually die.</end quote></div>

Another silver lining: Sometimes it's a chance to get taken care of for a legitimate, non-whiny reason even though you are an adult. My sons take care of me a lot. I couldn't hold down a full time job if they didn't. For most of my life, I haven't felt particularly cared for. This has been good for my soul. Being on the receiving end instead of the giving end for a change has been a growth experience for me.

MicheleGazelle
10-21-2008, 01:58 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>Lex</b></i>

Cf's silver lining....



....it reminds us that we will eventually die.</end quote>

Another silver lining: Sometimes it's a chance to get taken care of for a legitimate, non-whiny reason even though you are an adult. My sons take care of me a lot. I couldn't hold down a full time job if they didn't. For most of my life, I haven't felt particularly cared for. This has been good for my soul. Being on the receiving end instead of the giving end for a change has been a growth experience for me.

MicheleGazelle
10-21-2008, 01:58 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>Lex</b></i>
<br />
<br />Cf's silver lining....
<br />
<br />
<br />
<br />....it reminds us that we will eventually die.</end quote>
<br />
<br />Another silver lining: Sometimes it's a chance to get taken care of for a legitimate, non-whiny reason even though you are an adult. My sons take care of me a lot. I couldn't hold down a full time job if they didn't. For most of my life, I haven't felt particularly cared for. This has been good for my soul. Being on the receiving end instead of the giving end for a change has been a growth experience for me.

mamerth
10-21-2008, 08:02 PM
There are days when I wonder how long I will be around "fighting this". I hope I am around for ever. Don't let 37 or 35 be that magic number. There people here that have live beyond "37". I guarantee you I will celebrate hug when #37 comes my way. I am not going to let that be the end. Numbers don't mean a thing-- we have to live life. Create a future for yourself, make plans for the next 5,10, 15... years.

Of course, be a touch realistic.

There will be days even week when this illness seems like too much to carry. Don't carry your burden alone... what is why we are all here. .

mamerth
10-21-2008, 08:02 PM
There are days when I wonder how long I will be around "fighting this". I hope I am around for ever. Don't let 37 or 35 be that magic number. There people here that have live beyond "37". I guarantee you I will celebrate hug when #37 comes my way. I am not going to let that be the end. Numbers don't mean a thing-- we have to live life. Create a future for yourself, make plans for the next 5,10, 15... years.

Of course, be a touch realistic.

There will be days even week when this illness seems like too much to carry. Don't carry your burden alone... what is why we are all here. .

mamerth
10-21-2008, 08:02 PM
There are days when I wonder how long I will be around "fighting this". I hope I am around for ever. Don't let 37 or 35 be that magic number. There people here that have live beyond "37". I guarantee you I will celebrate hug when #37 comes my way. I am not going to let that be the end. Numbers don't mean a thing-- we have to live life. Create a future for yourself, make plans for the next 5,10, 15... years.

Of course, be a touch realistic.

There will be days even week when this illness seems like too much to carry. Don't carry your burden alone... what is why we are all here. .

mamerth
10-21-2008, 08:02 PM
There are days when I wonder how long I will be around "fighting this". I hope I am around for ever. Don't let 37 or 35 be that magic number. There people here that have live beyond "37". I guarantee you I will celebrate hug when #37 comes my way. I am not going to let that be the end. Numbers don't mean a thing-- we have to live life. Create a future for yourself, make plans for the next 5,10, 15... years.

Of course, be a touch realistic.

There will be days even week when this illness seems like too much to carry. Don't carry your burden alone... what is why we are all here. .

mamerth
10-21-2008, 08:02 PM
There are days when I wonder how long I will be around "fighting this". I hope I am around for ever. Don't let 37 or 35 be that magic number. There people here that have live beyond "37". I guarantee you I will celebrate hug when #37 comes my way. I am not going to let that be the end. Numbers don't mean a thing-- we have to live life. Create a future for yourself, make plans for the next 5,10, 15... years.
<br />
<br />Of course, be a touch realistic.
<br />
<br />There will be days even week when this illness seems like too much to carry. Don't carry your burden alone... what is why we are all here. .

Scars
10-21-2008, 08:21 PM
Hang in there buddy, I never thought Id be around this long.

Scars
10-21-2008, 08:21 PM
Hang in there buddy, I never thought Id be around this long.

Scars
10-21-2008, 08:21 PM
Hang in there buddy, I never thought Id be around this long.

Scars
10-21-2008, 08:21 PM
Hang in there buddy, I never thought Id be around this long.

Scars
10-21-2008, 08:21 PM
Hang in there buddy, I never thought Id be around this long.

mabusincarnate
10-21-2008, 09:49 PM
if i live to 50, i haven't lost anything by making this choice. i will have lived my life how i wanted, not how others wanted - which is what i've been doing.

mabusincarnate
10-21-2008, 09:49 PM
if i live to 50, i haven't lost anything by making this choice. i will have lived my life how i wanted, not how others wanted - which is what i've been doing.

mabusincarnate
10-21-2008, 09:49 PM
if i live to 50, i haven't lost anything by making this choice. i will have lived my life how i wanted, not how others wanted - which is what i've been doing.

mabusincarnate
10-21-2008, 09:49 PM
if i live to 50, i haven't lost anything by making this choice. i will have lived my life how i wanted, not how others wanted - which is what i've been doing.

mabusincarnate
10-21-2008, 09:49 PM
if i live to 50, i haven't lost anything by making this choice. i will have lived my life how i wanted, not how others wanted - which is what i've been doing.

Diane
10-22-2008, 12:06 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>mabusincarnate</b></i>

i will have lived my life how i wanted, not how others wanted - which is what i've been doing.</end quote></div>
If that is the case, then you are doing the right thing.

Diane
10-22-2008, 12:06 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>mabusincarnate</b></i>

i will have lived my life how i wanted, not how others wanted - which is what i've been doing.</end quote></div>
If that is the case, then you are doing the right thing.

Diane
10-22-2008, 12:06 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>mabusincarnate</b></i>

i will have lived my life how i wanted, not how others wanted - which is what i've been doing.</end quote></div>
If that is the case, then you are doing the right thing.

Diane
10-22-2008, 12:06 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>mabusincarnate</b></i>

i will have lived my life how i wanted, not how others wanted - which is what i've been doing.</end quote>
If that is the case, then you are doing the right thing.

Diane
10-22-2008, 12:06 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>mabusincarnate</b></i>
<br />
<br />i will have lived my life how i wanted, not how others wanted - which is what i've been doing.</end quote>
<br /> If that is the case, then you are doing the right thing.
<br />

Poobah
10-22-2008, 02:53 AM
I just joined because my step-son may have CF.

I dropped in on this thread and think I might have a different bit of perspective.

I have Stage IV Kidney Cancer. I was diagnosed in July of last year. Since then I have had a kidney removed, the lower half of my left lung removed and had a couple of nodes removed. I am taking a "targeted therapy" pill to hopefully fend off a return. Thanks to surgery, I don't have any visible tumors, but the cancer is loose.

There is no cure and 95% of Stage IV patients die within 5 years of diagnosis.

Please understand that I am not trying to make a comparison of our situations. They are both terrible. I just want to let you know that I faced a similar choice.

Which ever route you choose, make sure you have good insurance. You really don't want to have to make medical decisions based on your pocketbook.

Beyond that, do what makes you feel good. I dropped out of the workforce and am doing volunteer work. I liked my job as a Project Manager, but working with other cancer patients, disabled children and hospice patients is far more rewarding, and much less demanding.

One other thing to ponder. Two or three years ago there was only one standard treatment for Kidney Cancer. There are now three targeted therapies, a immune boosting therapy, stem cell transplants. There are many new drugs and therapies coming down the pipe. There is still no cure in sight, but I am hopeful that I'll hang around long enough that something will come along.

You never know what the future will bring.

I wish you well.

Terry

Poobah
10-22-2008, 02:53 AM
I just joined because my step-son may have CF.

I dropped in on this thread and think I might have a different bit of perspective.

I have Stage IV Kidney Cancer. I was diagnosed in July of last year. Since then I have had a kidney removed, the lower half of my left lung removed and had a couple of nodes removed. I am taking a "targeted therapy" pill to hopefully fend off a return. Thanks to surgery, I don't have any visible tumors, but the cancer is loose.

There is no cure and 95% of Stage IV patients die within 5 years of diagnosis.

Please understand that I am not trying to make a comparison of our situations. They are both terrible. I just want to let you know that I faced a similar choice.

Which ever route you choose, make sure you have good insurance. You really don't want to have to make medical decisions based on your pocketbook.

Beyond that, do what makes you feel good. I dropped out of the workforce and am doing volunteer work. I liked my job as a Project Manager, but working with other cancer patients, disabled children and hospice patients is far more rewarding, and much less demanding.

One other thing to ponder. Two or three years ago there was only one standard treatment for Kidney Cancer. There are now three targeted therapies, a immune boosting therapy, stem cell transplants. There are many new drugs and therapies coming down the pipe. There is still no cure in sight, but I am hopeful that I'll hang around long enough that something will come along.

You never know what the future will bring.

I wish you well.

Terry

Poobah
10-22-2008, 02:53 AM
I just joined because my step-son may have CF.

I dropped in on this thread and think I might have a different bit of perspective.

I have Stage IV Kidney Cancer. I was diagnosed in July of last year. Since then I have had a kidney removed, the lower half of my left lung removed and had a couple of nodes removed. I am taking a "targeted therapy" pill to hopefully fend off a return. Thanks to surgery, I don't have any visible tumors, but the cancer is loose.

There is no cure and 95% of Stage IV patients die within 5 years of diagnosis.

Please understand that I am not trying to make a comparison of our situations. They are both terrible. I just want to let you know that I faced a similar choice.

Which ever route you choose, make sure you have good insurance. You really don't want to have to make medical decisions based on your pocketbook.

Beyond that, do what makes you feel good. I dropped out of the workforce and am doing volunteer work. I liked my job as a Project Manager, but working with other cancer patients, disabled children and hospice patients is far more rewarding, and much less demanding.

One other thing to ponder. Two or three years ago there was only one standard treatment for Kidney Cancer. There are now three targeted therapies, a immune boosting therapy, stem cell transplants. There are many new drugs and therapies coming down the pipe. There is still no cure in sight, but I am hopeful that I'll hang around long enough that something will come along.

You never know what the future will bring.

I wish you well.

Terry

Poobah
10-22-2008, 02:53 AM
I just joined because my step-son may have CF.

I dropped in on this thread and think I might have a different bit of perspective.

I have Stage IV Kidney Cancer. I was diagnosed in July of last year. Since then I have had a kidney removed, the lower half of my left lung removed and had a couple of nodes removed. I am taking a "targeted therapy" pill to hopefully fend off a return. Thanks to surgery, I don't have any visible tumors, but the cancer is loose.

There is no cure and 95% of Stage IV patients die within 5 years of diagnosis.

Please understand that I am not trying to make a comparison of our situations. They are both terrible. I just want to let you know that I faced a similar choice.

Which ever route you choose, make sure you have good insurance. You really don't want to have to make medical decisions based on your pocketbook.

Beyond that, do what makes you feel good. I dropped out of the workforce and am doing volunteer work. I liked my job as a Project Manager, but working with other cancer patients, disabled children and hospice patients is far more rewarding, and much less demanding.

One other thing to ponder. Two or three years ago there was only one standard treatment for Kidney Cancer. There are now three targeted therapies, a immune boosting therapy, stem cell transplants. There are many new drugs and therapies coming down the pipe. There is still no cure in sight, but I am hopeful that I'll hang around long enough that something will come along.

You never know what the future will bring.

I wish you well.

Terry

Poobah
10-22-2008, 02:53 AM
I just joined because my step-son may have CF.
<br />
<br />I dropped in on this thread and think I might have a different bit of perspective.
<br />
<br />I have Stage IV Kidney Cancer. I was diagnosed in July of last year. Since then I have had a kidney removed, the lower half of my left lung removed and had a couple of nodes removed. I am taking a "targeted therapy" pill to hopefully fend off a return. Thanks to surgery, I don't have any visible tumors, but the cancer is loose.
<br />
<br />There is no cure and 95% of Stage IV patients die within 5 years of diagnosis.
<br />
<br />Please understand that I am not trying to make a comparison of our situations. They are both terrible. I just want to let you know that I faced a similar choice.
<br />
<br />Which ever route you choose, make sure you have good insurance. You really don't want to have to make medical decisions based on your pocketbook.
<br />
<br />Beyond that, do what makes you feel good. I dropped out of the workforce and am doing volunteer work. I liked my job as a Project Manager, but working with other cancer patients, disabled children and hospice patients is far more rewarding, and much less demanding.
<br />
<br />One other thing to ponder. Two or three years ago there was only one standard treatment for Kidney Cancer. There are now three targeted therapies, a immune boosting therapy, stem cell transplants. There are many new drugs and therapies coming down the pipe. There is still no cure in sight, but I am hopeful that I'll hang around long enough that something will come along.
<br />
<br />You never know what the future will bring.
<br />
<br />I wish you well.
<br />
<br />Terry
<br />
<br />
<br />
<br />
<br />
<br />
<br />

Nightwriter
10-22-2008, 03:11 AM
I can hear your heart starting to sing. I'm so happy you made the decision to follow your dreams and that you have a wonderful wife standing beside you. As you now know, pain makes change. When I was pursuing my own dream, the pain of not achieving my goal made it unbearable and gave me the courage to sneak into places, call intimidating people, and to keep trying when sometimes my dream was slipping away. And it's so sweet when you can work at something you really love, instead of staring at a clock or living just for your leisure time.

I always thought we spend to much time at work to be doing something you hate. In college I majored in Physical Education. When I was a teenager, I worked in a movie theater. Someone once said to me, "You think life should always amuse you." Of course.

I can see why you might not want to spend your days doing accounting. Although, NASA sounds pretty cool. But if you can make a difference in an inner city school kid's life or teach rock climbing (again soaring to new heights) you will come home every day with a smile on your face.

Best of luck to you. And a big hug to a wife that is making it possible for you to realize your dreams.

Nightwriter
10-22-2008, 03:11 AM
I can hear your heart starting to sing. I'm so happy you made the decision to follow your dreams and that you have a wonderful wife standing beside you. As you now know, pain makes change. When I was pursuing my own dream, the pain of not achieving my goal made it unbearable and gave me the courage to sneak into places, call intimidating people, and to keep trying when sometimes my dream was slipping away. And it's so sweet when you can work at something you really love, instead of staring at a clock or living just for your leisure time.

I always thought we spend to much time at work to be doing something you hate. In college I majored in Physical Education. When I was a teenager, I worked in a movie theater. Someone once said to me, "You think life should always amuse you." Of course.

I can see why you might not want to spend your days doing accounting. Although, NASA sounds pretty cool. But if you can make a difference in an inner city school kid's life or teach rock climbing (again soaring to new heights) you will come home every day with a smile on your face.

Best of luck to you. And a big hug to a wife that is making it possible for you to realize your dreams.

Nightwriter
10-22-2008, 03:11 AM
I can hear your heart starting to sing. I'm so happy you made the decision to follow your dreams and that you have a wonderful wife standing beside you. As you now know, pain makes change. When I was pursuing my own dream, the pain of not achieving my goal made it unbearable and gave me the courage to sneak into places, call intimidating people, and to keep trying when sometimes my dream was slipping away. And it's so sweet when you can work at something you really love, instead of staring at a clock or living just for your leisure time.

I always thought we spend to much time at work to be doing something you hate. In college I majored in Physical Education. When I was a teenager, I worked in a movie theater. Someone once said to me, "You think life should always amuse you." Of course.

I can see why you might not want to spend your days doing accounting. Although, NASA sounds pretty cool. But if you can make a difference in an inner city school kid's life or teach rock climbing (again soaring to new heights) you will come home every day with a smile on your face.

Best of luck to you. And a big hug to a wife that is making it possible for you to realize your dreams.

Nightwriter
10-22-2008, 03:11 AM
I can hear your heart starting to sing. I'm so happy you made the decision to follow your dreams and that you have a wonderful wife standing beside you. As you now know, pain makes change. When I was pursuing my own dream, the pain of not achieving my goal made it unbearable and gave me the courage to sneak into places, call intimidating people, and to keep trying when sometimes my dream was slipping away. And it's so sweet when you can work at something you really love, instead of staring at a clock or living just for your leisure time.

I always thought we spend to much time at work to be doing something you hate. In college I majored in Physical Education. When I was a teenager, I worked in a movie theater. Someone once said to me, "You think life should always amuse you." Of course.

I can see why you might not want to spend your days doing accounting. Although, NASA sounds pretty cool. But if you can make a difference in an inner city school kid's life or teach rock climbing (again soaring to new heights) you will come home every day with a smile on your face.

Best of luck to you. And a big hug to a wife that is making it possible for you to realize your dreams.

Nightwriter
10-22-2008, 03:11 AM
I can hear your heart starting to sing. I'm so happy you made the decision to follow your dreams and that you have a wonderful wife standing beside you. As you now know, pain makes change. When I was pursuing my own dream, the pain of not achieving my goal made it unbearable and gave me the courage to sneak into places, call intimidating people, and to keep trying when sometimes my dream was slipping away. And it's so sweet when you can work at something you really love, instead of staring at a clock or living just for your leisure time.
<br />
<br />I always thought we spend to much time at work to be doing something you hate. In college I majored in Physical Education. When I was a teenager, I worked in a movie theater. Someone once said to me, "You think life should always amuse you." Of course.
<br />
<br />I can see why you might not want to spend your days doing accounting. Although, NASA sounds pretty cool. But if you can make a difference in an inner city school kid's life or teach rock climbing (again soaring to new heights) you will come home every day with a smile on your face.
<br />
<br />Best of luck to you. And a big hug to a wife that is making it possible for you to realize your dreams.

MicheleGazelle
10-22-2008, 03:27 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>Poobah</b></i>
Beyond that, do what makes you feel good. I dropped out of the workforce and am doing volunteer work. I liked my job as a Project Manager, but working with other cancer patients, disabled children and hospice patients is far more rewarding, and much less demanding.
</end quote></div>

When I took a class called "Homelessness and Public Policy", our main textbook was a book called "Tell them who I am". It was written by a man who learned he was dying of cancer and decided to quit his job and spend his last months at the volunteer work he found so gratifying and to write a book about the lives of the homeless folks he knew through his volunteer work. It is one of the most wonderful things I have ever read. I think he lived his last year or so very fully, instead of just existing and doing treatments.

MicheleGazelle
10-22-2008, 03:27 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>Poobah</b></i>
Beyond that, do what makes you feel good. I dropped out of the workforce and am doing volunteer work. I liked my job as a Project Manager, but working with other cancer patients, disabled children and hospice patients is far more rewarding, and much less demanding.
</end quote></div>

When I took a class called "Homelessness and Public Policy", our main textbook was a book called "Tell them who I am". It was written by a man who learned he was dying of cancer and decided to quit his job and spend his last months at the volunteer work he found so gratifying and to write a book about the lives of the homeless folks he knew through his volunteer work. It is one of the most wonderful things I have ever read. I think he lived his last year or so very fully, instead of just existing and doing treatments.

MicheleGazelle
10-22-2008, 03:27 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>Poobah</b></i>
Beyond that, do what makes you feel good. I dropped out of the workforce and am doing volunteer work. I liked my job as a Project Manager, but working with other cancer patients, disabled children and hospice patients is far more rewarding, and much less demanding.
</end quote></div>

When I took a class called "Homelessness and Public Policy", our main textbook was a book called "Tell them who I am". It was written by a man who learned he was dying of cancer and decided to quit his job and spend his last months at the volunteer work he found so gratifying and to write a book about the lives of the homeless folks he knew through his volunteer work. It is one of the most wonderful things I have ever read. I think he lived his last year or so very fully, instead of just existing and doing treatments.

MicheleGazelle
10-22-2008, 03:27 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>Poobah</b></i>
Beyond that, do what makes you feel good. I dropped out of the workforce and am doing volunteer work. I liked my job as a Project Manager, but working with other cancer patients, disabled children and hospice patients is far more rewarding, and much less demanding.
</end quote>

When I took a class called "Homelessness and Public Policy", our main textbook was a book called "Tell them who I am". It was written by a man who learned he was dying of cancer and decided to quit his job and spend his last months at the volunteer work he found so gratifying and to write a book about the lives of the homeless folks he knew through his volunteer work. It is one of the most wonderful things I have ever read. I think he lived his last year or so very fully, instead of just existing and doing treatments.

MicheleGazelle
10-22-2008, 03:27 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>Poobah</b></i>
<br />Beyond that, do what makes you feel good. I dropped out of the workforce and am doing volunteer work. I liked my job as a Project Manager, but working with other cancer patients, disabled children and hospice patients is far more rewarding, and much less demanding.
<br /></end quote>
<br />
<br />When I took a class called "Homelessness and Public Policy", our main textbook was a book called "Tell them who I am". It was written by a man who learned he was dying of cancer and decided to quit his job and spend his last months at the volunteer work he found so gratifying and to write a book about the lives of the homeless folks he knew through his volunteer work. It is one of the most wonderful things I have ever read. I think he lived his last year or so very fully, instead of just existing and doing treatments.

welshwitch
10-22-2008, 06:07 PM
do what you really want to do. life's too short to waste it with jobs that are a waste of your time and spirit. additionally, i agree with what a lot of folks are saying. don't pay attention to the statistics. if you do, you'll waste a lot of time worrying about it--and then, what IF you live til 50? 60? 80? more wasted time and energy. cfers know more than most to just go for it.

welshwitch
10-22-2008, 06:07 PM
do what you really want to do. life's too short to waste it with jobs that are a waste of your time and spirit. additionally, i agree with what a lot of folks are saying. don't pay attention to the statistics. if you do, you'll waste a lot of time worrying about it--and then, what IF you live til 50? 60? 80? more wasted time and energy. cfers know more than most to just go for it.

welshwitch
10-22-2008, 06:07 PM
do what you really want to do. life's too short to waste it with jobs that are a waste of your time and spirit. additionally, i agree with what a lot of folks are saying. don't pay attention to the statistics. if you do, you'll waste a lot of time worrying about it--and then, what IF you live til 50? 60? 80? more wasted time and energy. cfers know more than most to just go for it.

welshwitch
10-22-2008, 06:07 PM
do what you really want to do. life's too short to waste it with jobs that are a waste of your time and spirit. additionally, i agree with what a lot of folks are saying. don't pay attention to the statistics. if you do, you'll waste a lot of time worrying about it--and then, what IF you live til 50? 60? 80? more wasted time and energy. cfers know more than most to just go for it.

welshwitch
10-22-2008, 06:07 PM
do what you really want to do. life's too short to waste it with jobs that are a waste of your time and spirit. additionally, i agree with what a lot of folks are saying. don't pay attention to the statistics. if you do, you'll waste a lot of time worrying about it--and then, what IF you live til 50? 60? 80? more wasted time and energy. cfers know more than most to just go for it.

mabusincarnate
10-23-2008, 12:40 AM
The idea of NASA is cool. I've experienced some things that most people outside of Houston have only seen on TV.

However, there's a dark side of NASA people don't like to talk about. When was the last time you enjoyed your visit to the DMV or better yet, filing your tax return? It's government work.

I haven't decided what I'm going to do yet. I won't quit my job until I figure it out. This process won't happen over night.

My wife has her reservations but overall, she's supportive. I plan to contribute in ways other than with a 'real' paycheck. Right now we eat out at least 2 meals per day. We go months without going to the grocery store. That's not an exaggeration. If I'm not working a "real" job, I'll cook nice meals like I did before we were both so busy.

mabusincarnate
10-23-2008, 12:40 AM
The idea of NASA is cool. I've experienced some things that most people outside of Houston have only seen on TV.

However, there's a dark side of NASA people don't like to talk about. When was the last time you enjoyed your visit to the DMV or better yet, filing your tax return? It's government work.

I haven't decided what I'm going to do yet. I won't quit my job until I figure it out. This process won't happen over night.

My wife has her reservations but overall, she's supportive. I plan to contribute in ways other than with a 'real' paycheck. Right now we eat out at least 2 meals per day. We go months without going to the grocery store. That's not an exaggeration. If I'm not working a "real" job, I'll cook nice meals like I did before we were both so busy.

mabusincarnate
10-23-2008, 12:40 AM
The idea of NASA is cool. I've experienced some things that most people outside of Houston have only seen on TV.

However, there's a dark side of NASA people don't like to talk about. When was the last time you enjoyed your visit to the DMV or better yet, filing your tax return? It's government work.

I haven't decided what I'm going to do yet. I won't quit my job until I figure it out. This process won't happen over night.

My wife has her reservations but overall, she's supportive. I plan to contribute in ways other than with a 'real' paycheck. Right now we eat out at least 2 meals per day. We go months without going to the grocery store. That's not an exaggeration. If I'm not working a "real" job, I'll cook nice meals like I did before we were both so busy.

mabusincarnate
10-23-2008, 12:40 AM
The idea of NASA is cool. I've experienced some things that most people outside of Houston have only seen on TV.

However, there's a dark side of NASA people don't like to talk about. When was the last time you enjoyed your visit to the DMV or better yet, filing your tax return? It's government work.

I haven't decided what I'm going to do yet. I won't quit my job until I figure it out. This process won't happen over night.

My wife has her reservations but overall, she's supportive. I plan to contribute in ways other than with a 'real' paycheck. Right now we eat out at least 2 meals per day. We go months without going to the grocery store. That's not an exaggeration. If I'm not working a "real" job, I'll cook nice meals like I did before we were both so busy.

mabusincarnate
10-23-2008, 12:40 AM
The idea of NASA is cool. I've experienced some things that most people outside of Houston have only seen on TV.
<br />
<br />However, there's a dark side of NASA people don't like to talk about. When was the last time you enjoyed your visit to the DMV or better yet, filing your tax return? It's government work.
<br />
<br />I haven't decided what I'm going to do yet. I won't quit my job until I figure it out. This process won't happen over night.
<br />
<br />My wife has her reservations but overall, she's supportive. I plan to contribute in ways other than with a 'real' paycheck. Right now we eat out at least 2 meals per day. We go months without going to the grocery store. That's not an exaggeration. If I'm not working a "real" job, I'll cook nice meals like I did before we were both so busy.

MicheleGazelle
10-23-2008, 01:36 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>mabusincarnate</b></i>

The idea of NASA is cool. I've experienced some things that most people outside of Houston have only seen on TV.

</end quote></div>

I don't know where you live currently, but if you aren't already in Houston, here is food for thought:
During the course of my divorce, I traveled around a bit looking for some place I might want to live. I found the Texas coast pretty polluted because of the oil industry. A lot of places, we drove through without stopping because we couldn't breathe. Then we got to Houston. We had lunch there. I walked out of the restaurant and threw up a little in my car because the air was so toxic.

A pollution map suggests why and is rather frightening:
<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://scorecard.org/env-releases/cap/">http://scorecard.org/env-releases/cap/</a> (The large cluster of red dots in Texas is basically Houston and surrounding areas.)

So...I don't plan on living in Houston. Ever.

Good luck with your decision.

MicheleGazelle
10-23-2008, 01:36 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>mabusincarnate</b></i>

The idea of NASA is cool. I've experienced some things that most people outside of Houston have only seen on TV.

</end quote></div>

I don't know where you live currently, but if you aren't already in Houston, here is food for thought:
During the course of my divorce, I traveled around a bit looking for some place I might want to live. I found the Texas coast pretty polluted because of the oil industry. A lot of places, we drove through without stopping because we couldn't breathe. Then we got to Houston. We had lunch there. I walked out of the restaurant and threw up a little in my car because the air was so toxic.

A pollution map suggests why and is rather frightening:
<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://scorecard.org/env-releases/cap/">http://scorecard.org/env-releases/cap/</a> (The large cluster of red dots in Texas is basically Houston and surrounding areas.)

So...I don't plan on living in Houston. Ever.

Good luck with your decision.

MicheleGazelle
10-23-2008, 01:36 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>mabusincarnate</b></i>

The idea of NASA is cool. I've experienced some things that most people outside of Houston have only seen on TV.

</end quote></div>

I don't know where you live currently, but if you aren't already in Houston, here is food for thought:
During the course of my divorce, I traveled around a bit looking for some place I might want to live. I found the Texas coast pretty polluted because of the oil industry. A lot of places, we drove through without stopping because we couldn't breathe. Then we got to Houston. We had lunch there. I walked out of the restaurant and threw up a little in my car because the air was so toxic.

A pollution map suggests why and is rather frightening:
<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://scorecard.org/env-releases/cap/">http://scorecard.org/env-releases/cap/</a> (The large cluster of red dots in Texas is basically Houston and surrounding areas.)

So...I don't plan on living in Houston. Ever.

Good luck with your decision.

MicheleGazelle
10-23-2008, 01:36 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>mabusincarnate</b></i>

The idea of NASA is cool. I've experienced some things that most people outside of Houston have only seen on TV.

</end quote>

I don't know where you live currently, but if you aren't already in Houston, here is food for thought:
During the course of my divorce, I traveled around a bit looking for some place I might want to live. I found the Texas coast pretty polluted because of the oil industry. A lot of places, we drove through without stopping because we couldn't breathe. Then we got to Houston. We had lunch there. I walked out of the restaurant and threw up a little in my car because the air was so toxic.

A pollution map suggests why and is rather frightening:
<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://scorecard.org/env-releases/cap/">http://scorecard.org/env-releases/cap/</a> (The large cluster of red dots in Texas is basically Houston and surrounding areas.)

So...I don't plan on living in Houston. Ever.

Good luck with your decision.

MicheleGazelle
10-23-2008, 01:36 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>mabusincarnate</b></i>
<br />
<br />The idea of NASA is cool. I've experienced some things that most people outside of Houston have only seen on TV.
<br />
<br /></end quote>
<br />
<br />I don't know where you live currently, but if you aren't already in Houston, here is food for thought:
<br />During the course of my divorce, I traveled around a bit looking for some place I might want to live. I found the Texas coast pretty polluted because of the oil industry. A lot of places, we drove through without stopping because we couldn't breathe. Then we got to Houston. We had lunch there. I walked out of the restaurant and threw up a little in my car because the air was so toxic.
<br />
<br />A pollution map suggests why and is rather frightening:
<br /><a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://scorecard.org/env-releases/cap/">http://scorecard.org/env-releases/cap/</a> (The large cluster of red dots in Texas is basically Houston and surrounding areas.)
<br />
<br />So...I don't plan on living in Houston. Ever.
<br />
<br />Good luck with your decision.

JazzysMom
10-23-2008, 10:42 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>karenb</b></i>

Love lots....



And keep a journal for those you love telling them how they keep you wishing for one more day to make the world better for them.</end quote></div>


FANTASTIC & will be treasured for generations!

HUGS Karen

JazzysMom
10-23-2008, 10:42 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>karenb</b></i>

Love lots....



And keep a journal for those you love telling them how they keep you wishing for one more day to make the world better for them.</end quote></div>


FANTASTIC & will be treasured for generations!

HUGS Karen

JazzysMom
10-23-2008, 10:42 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>karenb</b></i>

Love lots....



And keep a journal for those you love telling them how they keep you wishing for one more day to make the world better for them.</end quote></div>


FANTASTIC & will be treasured for generations!

HUGS Karen

JazzysMom
10-23-2008, 10:42 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>karenb</b></i>

Love lots....



And keep a journal for those you love telling them how they keep you wishing for one more day to make the world better for them.</end quote>


FANTASTIC & will be treasured for generations!

HUGS Karen

JazzysMom
10-23-2008, 10:42 AM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>karenb</b></i>
<br />
<br />Love lots....
<br />
<br />
<br />
<br />And keep a journal for those you love telling them how they keep you wishing for one more day to make the world better for them.</end quote>
<br />
<br />
<br />FANTASTIC & will be treasured for generations!
<br />
<br />HUGS Karen
<br />
<br />

minimedic304
10-23-2008, 11:08 AM
I to am face with you same situation mabusincarnate, 10 years ago I was a paramedic, working and volunteering 24/7. I moved to orlando 4 years ago because I couldn't do that anymore. I love being a paramedic and knew the only way I would stop being one was to move away where I couldnt be one. So here I am in Orlando, I just started collecting disability and now can only work two days a week. This has made me very depressed because my mind still wants to be involved in emergency services but my body is not listening and my cf is getting worse. My only saviour is my fishing guide business. I love to fish and I am glad I still can, but I know eventually I will have to give that up too.

minimedic304
10-23-2008, 11:08 AM
I to am face with you same situation mabusincarnate, 10 years ago I was a paramedic, working and volunteering 24/7. I moved to orlando 4 years ago because I couldn't do that anymore. I love being a paramedic and knew the only way I would stop being one was to move away where I couldnt be one. So here I am in Orlando, I just started collecting disability and now can only work two days a week. This has made me very depressed because my mind still wants to be involved in emergency services but my body is not listening and my cf is getting worse. My only saviour is my fishing guide business. I love to fish and I am glad I still can, but I know eventually I will have to give that up too.

minimedic304
10-23-2008, 11:08 AM
I to am face with you same situation mabusincarnate, 10 years ago I was a paramedic, working and volunteering 24/7. I moved to orlando 4 years ago because I couldn't do that anymore. I love being a paramedic and knew the only way I would stop being one was to move away where I couldnt be one. So here I am in Orlando, I just started collecting disability and now can only work two days a week. This has made me very depressed because my mind still wants to be involved in emergency services but my body is not listening and my cf is getting worse. My only saviour is my fishing guide business. I love to fish and I am glad I still can, but I know eventually I will have to give that up too.

minimedic304
10-23-2008, 11:08 AM
I to am face with you same situation mabusincarnate, 10 years ago I was a paramedic, working and volunteering 24/7. I moved to orlando 4 years ago because I couldn't do that anymore. I love being a paramedic and knew the only way I would stop being one was to move away where I couldnt be one. So here I am in Orlando, I just started collecting disability and now can only work two days a week. This has made me very depressed because my mind still wants to be involved in emergency services but my body is not listening and my cf is getting worse. My only saviour is my fishing guide business. I love to fish and I am glad I still can, but I know eventually I will have to give that up too.

minimedic304
10-23-2008, 11:08 AM
I to am face with you same situation mabusincarnate, 10 years ago I was a paramedic, working and volunteering 24/7. I moved to orlando 4 years ago because I couldn't do that anymore. I love being a paramedic and knew the only way I would stop being one was to move away where I couldnt be one. So here I am in Orlando, I just started collecting disability and now can only work two days a week. This has made me very depressed because my mind still wants to be involved in emergency services but my body is not listening and my cf is getting worse. My only saviour is my fishing guide business. I love to fish and I am glad I still can, but I know eventually I will have to give that up too.

mabusincarnate
10-23-2008, 12:20 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote>

I walked out of the restaurant and threw up a little in my car because the air was so toxic.

</end quote></div>

I HATE Houston. HATE. I've been to lots of cities and it's my least favorite. Traffic, drivers, people, restaurants, culture, pollution, you name it. I can't stand the uptight conservative born-again suburbanites. I can't stand the endless miles of strip malls. Chain restaurants have put the good places out of business. Nature is dead. Gone. We killed it.

I asked the doc if she had regional FEV1 statistics that could show a definitive correlation to pollution. She tried to act like there was no correlation. Based on how she danced around the question, I'm not sure she was being entirely truthful.

But, my wife refuses to move. She will let me quit my job to find something I like but she draws the line at giving up what she likes. That's fair, I guess but there's a market for her job all over the country. Whatever...

mabusincarnate
10-23-2008, 12:20 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote>

I walked out of the restaurant and threw up a little in my car because the air was so toxic.

</end quote></div>

I HATE Houston. HATE. I've been to lots of cities and it's my least favorite. Traffic, drivers, people, restaurants, culture, pollution, you name it. I can't stand the uptight conservative born-again suburbanites. I can't stand the endless miles of strip malls. Chain restaurants have put the good places out of business. Nature is dead. Gone. We killed it.

I asked the doc if she had regional FEV1 statistics that could show a definitive correlation to pollution. She tried to act like there was no correlation. Based on how she danced around the question, I'm not sure she was being entirely truthful.

But, my wife refuses to move. She will let me quit my job to find something I like but she draws the line at giving up what she likes. That's fair, I guess but there's a market for her job all over the country. Whatever...

mabusincarnate
10-23-2008, 12:20 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote>

I walked out of the restaurant and threw up a little in my car because the air was so toxic.

</end quote></div>

I HATE Houston. HATE. I've been to lots of cities and it's my least favorite. Traffic, drivers, people, restaurants, culture, pollution, you name it. I can't stand the uptight conservative born-again suburbanites. I can't stand the endless miles of strip malls. Chain restaurants have put the good places out of business. Nature is dead. Gone. We killed it.

I asked the doc if she had regional FEV1 statistics that could show a definitive correlation to pollution. She tried to act like there was no correlation. Based on how she danced around the question, I'm not sure she was being entirely truthful.

But, my wife refuses to move. She will let me quit my job to find something I like but she draws the line at giving up what she likes. That's fair, I guess but there's a market for her job all over the country. Whatever...

mabusincarnate
10-23-2008, 12:20 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote>

I walked out of the restaurant and threw up a little in my car because the air was so toxic.

</end quote>

I HATE Houston. HATE. I've been to lots of cities and it's my least favorite. Traffic, drivers, people, restaurants, culture, pollution, you name it. I can't stand the uptight conservative born-again suburbanites. I can't stand the endless miles of strip malls. Chain restaurants have put the good places out of business. Nature is dead. Gone. We killed it.

I asked the doc if she had regional FEV1 statistics that could show a definitive correlation to pollution. She tried to act like there was no correlation. Based on how she danced around the question, I'm not sure she was being entirely truthful.

But, my wife refuses to move. She will let me quit my job to find something I like but she draws the line at giving up what she likes. That's fair, I guess but there's a market for her job all over the country. Whatever...

mabusincarnate
10-23-2008, 12:20 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote>
<br />
<br />I walked out of the restaurant and threw up a little in my car because the air was so toxic.
<br />
<br /></end quote>
<br />
<br />I HATE Houston. HATE. I've been to lots of cities and it's my least favorite. Traffic, drivers, people, restaurants, culture, pollution, you name it. I can't stand the uptight conservative born-again suburbanites. I can't stand the endless miles of strip malls. Chain restaurants have put the good places out of business. Nature is dead. Gone. We killed it.
<br />
<br />I asked the doc if she had regional FEV1 statistics that could show a definitive correlation to pollution. She tried to act like there was no correlation. Based on how she danced around the question, I'm not sure she was being entirely truthful.
<br />
<br />But, my wife refuses to move. She will let me quit my job to find something I like but she draws the line at giving up what she likes. That's fair, I guess but there's a market for her job all over the country. Whatever...

MicheleGazelle
10-23-2008, 01:40 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>mabusincarnate</b></i>


But, my wife refuses to move. She will let me quit my job to find something I like but she draws the line at giving up what she likes. That's fair, I guess but there's a market for her job all over the country. Whatever...</end quote></div>

That bites. I divorced a man whom I felt was a threat to my life over the things he would not do/could not change in himself. So I can understand the frustration.

I will suggest that you consider doing some scouting and find a job/volunteer work/whatever in the least polluted/most tolerable spot you can manage to commute to from where you currently live. Being in a less polluted environment even a few hours a week might improve things for you. And maybe do some research on which houseplants will help improve air quality. I recall Aloe Vera are in the top five for that. I used to have a bunch of them. They are low maintenance desert plants, so they survived my severe neglect of them. It might be a way to help your situation without being a huge time and energy burden.

Even in a region, there will be variability in air quality from spot to spot. I was adamant about getting into the apartment complex I live in. It is tons cleaner than any other apartment complex I looked at. Most of them, we drove into the parking lot and turned around and drove out because we began to cough and gag. This one is up on a hill, surrounded by trees, and the dumpster is at the bottom of the hill with its own driveway for the dump truck to access. The apartment complex next to us has much poorer air quality in part because some of their apartments have fireplaces, even though it is also up on a hill and surrounded by trees and the dumpster has a similar placement (though without its own entrance for the dump truck).

So if you are stuck in Houston, I would encourage you to do what you can to arrange the best air quality you can in your home and in whatever employment or other activities you pursue.

MicheleGazelle
10-23-2008, 01:40 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>mabusincarnate</b></i>


But, my wife refuses to move. She will let me quit my job to find something I like but she draws the line at giving up what she likes. That's fair, I guess but there's a market for her job all over the country. Whatever...</end quote></div>

That bites. I divorced a man whom I felt was a threat to my life over the things he would not do/could not change in himself. So I can understand the frustration.

I will suggest that you consider doing some scouting and find a job/volunteer work/whatever in the least polluted/most tolerable spot you can manage to commute to from where you currently live. Being in a less polluted environment even a few hours a week might improve things for you. And maybe do some research on which houseplants will help improve air quality. I recall Aloe Vera are in the top five for that. I used to have a bunch of them. They are low maintenance desert plants, so they survived my severe neglect of them. It might be a way to help your situation without being a huge time and energy burden.

Even in a region, there will be variability in air quality from spot to spot. I was adamant about getting into the apartment complex I live in. It is tons cleaner than any other apartment complex I looked at. Most of them, we drove into the parking lot and turned around and drove out because we began to cough and gag. This one is up on a hill, surrounded by trees, and the dumpster is at the bottom of the hill with its own driveway for the dump truck to access. The apartment complex next to us has much poorer air quality in part because some of their apartments have fireplaces, even though it is also up on a hill and surrounded by trees and the dumpster has a similar placement (though without its own entrance for the dump truck).

So if you are stuck in Houston, I would encourage you to do what you can to arrange the best air quality you can in your home and in whatever employment or other activities you pursue.

MicheleGazelle
10-23-2008, 01:40 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>mabusincarnate</b></i>


But, my wife refuses to move. She will let me quit my job to find something I like but she draws the line at giving up what she likes. That's fair, I guess but there's a market for her job all over the country. Whatever...</end quote></div>

That bites. I divorced a man whom I felt was a threat to my life over the things he would not do/could not change in himself. So I can understand the frustration.

I will suggest that you consider doing some scouting and find a job/volunteer work/whatever in the least polluted/most tolerable spot you can manage to commute to from where you currently live. Being in a less polluted environment even a few hours a week might improve things for you. And maybe do some research on which houseplants will help improve air quality. I recall Aloe Vera are in the top five for that. I used to have a bunch of them. They are low maintenance desert plants, so they survived my severe neglect of them. It might be a way to help your situation without being a huge time and energy burden.

Even in a region, there will be variability in air quality from spot to spot. I was adamant about getting into the apartment complex I live in. It is tons cleaner than any other apartment complex I looked at. Most of them, we drove into the parking lot and turned around and drove out because we began to cough and gag. This one is up on a hill, surrounded by trees, and the dumpster is at the bottom of the hill with its own driveway for the dump truck to access. The apartment complex next to us has much poorer air quality in part because some of their apartments have fireplaces, even though it is also up on a hill and surrounded by trees and the dumpster has a similar placement (though without its own entrance for the dump truck).

So if you are stuck in Houston, I would encourage you to do what you can to arrange the best air quality you can in your home and in whatever employment or other activities you pursue.

MicheleGazelle
10-23-2008, 01:40 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>mabusincarnate</b></i>


But, my wife refuses to move. She will let me quit my job to find something I like but she draws the line at giving up what she likes. That's fair, I guess but there's a market for her job all over the country. Whatever...</end quote>

That bites. I divorced a man whom I felt was a threat to my life over the things he would not do/could not change in himself. So I can understand the frustration.

I will suggest that you consider doing some scouting and find a job/volunteer work/whatever in the least polluted/most tolerable spot you can manage to commute to from where you currently live. Being in a less polluted environment even a few hours a week might improve things for you. And maybe do some research on which houseplants will help improve air quality. I recall Aloe Vera are in the top five for that. I used to have a bunch of them. They are low maintenance desert plants, so they survived my severe neglect of them. It might be a way to help your situation without being a huge time and energy burden.

Even in a region, there will be variability in air quality from spot to spot. I was adamant about getting into the apartment complex I live in. It is tons cleaner than any other apartment complex I looked at. Most of them, we drove into the parking lot and turned around and drove out because we began to cough and gag. This one is up on a hill, surrounded by trees, and the dumpster is at the bottom of the hill with its own driveway for the dump truck to access. The apartment complex next to us has much poorer air quality in part because some of their apartments have fireplaces, even though it is also up on a hill and surrounded by trees and the dumpster has a similar placement (though without its own entrance for the dump truck).

So if you are stuck in Houston, I would encourage you to do what you can to arrange the best air quality you can in your home and in whatever employment or other activities you pursue.

MicheleGazelle
10-23-2008, 01:40 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote><i>Originally posted by: <b>mabusincarnate</b></i>
<br />
<br />
<br />But, my wife refuses to move. She will let me quit my job to find something I like but she draws the line at giving up what she likes. That's fair, I guess but there's a market for her job all over the country. Whatever...</end quote>
<br />
<br />That bites. I divorced a man whom I felt was a threat to my life over the things he would not do/could not change in himself. So I can understand the frustration.
<br />
<br />I will suggest that you consider doing some scouting and find a job/volunteer work/whatever in the least polluted/most tolerable spot you can manage to commute to from where you currently live. Being in a less polluted environment even a few hours a week might improve things for you. And maybe do some research on which houseplants will help improve air quality. I recall Aloe Vera are in the top five for that. I used to have a bunch of them. They are low maintenance desert plants, so they survived my severe neglect of them. It might be a way to help your situation without being a huge time and energy burden.
<br />
<br />Even in a region, there will be variability in air quality from spot to spot. I was adamant about getting into the apartment complex I live in. It is tons cleaner than any other apartment complex I looked at. Most of them, we drove into the parking lot and turned around and drove out because we began to cough and gag. This one is up on a hill, surrounded by trees, and the dumpster is at the bottom of the hill with its own driveway for the dump truck to access. The apartment complex next to us has much poorer air quality in part because some of their apartments have fireplaces, even though it is also up on a hill and surrounded by trees and the dumpster has a similar placement (though without its own entrance for the dump truck).
<br />
<br />So if you are stuck in Houston, I would encourage you to do what you can to arrange the best air quality you can in your home and in whatever employment or other activities you pursue.

mabusincarnate
10-23-2008, 02:43 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote>
That bites. I divorced a man whom I felt was a threat to my life over the things he would not do/could not change in himself. So I can understand the frustration.
</end quote></div>

Living in Houston isn't a deal breaker for our marriage, by any means. We live in one of those downtown urban (gentrified urban, not hoodrat) things with all the nightlife within walking distance. The bad areas are out in the suburbs with the refineries. The air gets so bad it makes you want to deepthroat a diesel exhaust for a breath of fresher air.

mabusincarnate
10-23-2008, 02:43 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote>
That bites. I divorced a man whom I felt was a threat to my life over the things he would not do/could not change in himself. So I can understand the frustration.
</end quote></div>

Living in Houston isn't a deal breaker for our marriage, by any means. We live in one of those downtown urban (gentrified urban, not hoodrat) things with all the nightlife within walking distance. The bad areas are out in the suburbs with the refineries. The air gets so bad it makes you want to deepthroat a diesel exhaust for a breath of fresher air.

mabusincarnate
10-23-2008, 02:43 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote>
That bites. I divorced a man whom I felt was a threat to my life over the things he would not do/could not change in himself. So I can understand the frustration.
</end quote></div>

Living in Houston isn't a deal breaker for our marriage, by any means. We live in one of those downtown urban (gentrified urban, not hoodrat) things with all the nightlife within walking distance. The bad areas are out in the suburbs with the refineries. The air gets so bad it makes you want to deepthroat a diesel exhaust for a breath of fresher air.

mabusincarnate
10-23-2008, 02:43 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote>
That bites. I divorced a man whom I felt was a threat to my life over the things he would not do/could not change in himself. So I can understand the frustration.
</end quote>

Living in Houston isn't a deal breaker for our marriage, by any means. We live in one of those downtown urban (gentrified urban, not hoodrat) things with all the nightlife within walking distance. The bad areas are out in the suburbs with the refineries. The air gets so bad it makes you want to deepthroat a diesel exhaust for a breath of fresher air.

mabusincarnate
10-23-2008, 02:43 PM
<div class="FTQUOTE"><begin quote>
<br />That bites. I divorced a man whom I felt was a threat to my life over the things he would not do/could not change in himself. So I can understand the frustration.
<br /></end quote>
<br />
<br />Living in Houston isn't a deal breaker for our marriage, by any means. We live in one of those downtown urban (gentrified urban, not hoodrat) things with all the nightlife within walking distance. The bad areas are out in the suburbs with the refineries. The air gets so bad it makes you want to deepthroat a diesel exhaust for a breath of fresher air.
<br />
<br />

MicheleGazelle
10-23-2008, 02:48 PM
LOL at "deepthroat a diesel exhaust for a breath of fresher air."

I wasn't trying to suggest divorce. That was just my situation.

MicheleGazelle
10-23-2008, 02:48 PM
LOL at "deepthroat a diesel exhaust for a breath of fresher air."

I wasn't trying to suggest divorce. That was just my situation.

MicheleGazelle
10-23-2008, 02:48 PM
LOL at "deepthroat a diesel exhaust for a breath of fresher air."

I wasn't trying to suggest divorce. That was just my situation.

MicheleGazelle
10-23-2008, 02:48 PM
LOL at "deepthroat a diesel exhaust for a breath of fresher air."

I wasn't trying to suggest divorce. That was just my situation.

MicheleGazelle
10-23-2008, 02:48 PM
LOL at "deepthroat a diesel exhaust for a breath of fresher air."
<br />
<br />I wasn't trying to suggest divorce. That was just my situation.

flynnycat
10-23-2008, 05:55 PM
my boyfriend has been told several times that he wouldn't live past a certain age. He's still here, and I am doing my best to keep it that way by keeping him healthy. He says that a positive outlook is a must, and that negativity must be banished. Be grateful for each day we have. I know it's cliche, but it's true. I've learned a lot from my guy.

flynnycat
10-23-2008, 05:55 PM
my boyfriend has been told several times that he wouldn't live past a certain age. He's still here, and I am doing my best to keep it that way by keeping him healthy. He says that a positive outlook is a must, and that negativity must be banished. Be grateful for each day we have. I know it's cliche, but it's true. I've learned a lot from my guy.

flynnycat
10-23-2008, 05:55 PM
my boyfriend has been told several times that he wouldn't live past a certain age. He's still here, and I am doing my best to keep it that way by keeping him healthy. He says that a positive outlook is a must, and that negativity must be banished. Be grateful for each day we have. I know it's cliche, but it's true. I've learned a lot from my guy.

flynnycat
10-23-2008, 05:55 PM
my boyfriend has been told several times that he wouldn't live past a certain age. He's still here, and I am doing my best to keep it that way by keeping him healthy. He says that a positive outlook is a must, and that negativity must be banished. Be grateful for each day we have. I know it's cliche, but it's true. I've learned a lot from my guy.

flynnycat
10-23-2008, 05:55 PM
my boyfriend has been told several times that he wouldn't live past a certain age. He's still here, and I am doing my best to keep it that way by keeping him healthy. He says that a positive outlook is a must, and that negativity must be banished. Be grateful for each day we have. I know it's cliche, but it's true. I've learned a lot from my guy.

Nightwriter
10-23-2008, 06:15 PM
Hey Mabe (may I call you Mabe?)

I live in Los Angeles, which is about the worst air possible, and I've done really well. Except when my neighborhood has been on fire...like last week! Anyway, although obviously better air is better for you... your indoor air is most important. Sorry, but according to my doctor, no plants (soil has mold, fungi,and carry bacterias like Cepacia).

I was declining rapidly, but when I treated the asthma component to CF with appropriate meds and supplements, improved my environment, added exercise, better diet, my CF reversed course completely. Within 2 years my base FEV1 went from mid 30's to low 50's. It even went up in this past year as I've added a few new things to my regimen. When I "fall off the wagon" I get into trouble.

I've posted about this before Mabe, if you are interested. We'll stretch your 10 years to 20 and beyond!

Nightwriter
10-23-2008, 06:15 PM
Hey Mabe (may I call you Mabe?)

I live in Los Angeles, which is about the worst air possible, and I've done really well. Except when my neighborhood has been on fire...like last week! Anyway, although obviously better air is better for you... your indoor air is most important. Sorry, but according to my doctor, no plants (soil has mold, fungi,and carry bacterias like Cepacia).

I was declining rapidly, but when I treated the asthma component to CF with appropriate meds and supplements, improved my environment, added exercise, better diet, my CF reversed course completely. Within 2 years my base FEV1 went from mid 30's to low 50's. It even went up in this past year as I've added a few new things to my regimen. When I "fall off the wagon" I get into trouble.

I've posted about this before Mabe, if you are interested. We'll stretch your 10 years to 20 and beyond!

Nightwriter
10-23-2008, 06:15 PM
Hey Mabe (may I call you Mabe?)

I live in Los Angeles, which is about the worst air possible, and I've done really well. Except when my neighborhood has been on fire...like last week! Anyway, although obviously better air is better for you... your indoor air is most important. Sorry, but according to my doctor, no plants (soil has mold, fungi,and carry bacterias like Cepacia).

I was declining rapidly, but when I treated the asthma component to CF with appropriate meds and supplements, improved my environment, added exercise, better diet, my CF reversed course completely. Within 2 years my base FEV1 went from mid 30's to low 50's. It even went up in this past year as I've added a few new things to my regimen. When I "fall off the wagon" I get into trouble.

I've posted about this before Mabe, if you are interested. We'll stretch your 10 years to 20 and beyond!

Nightwriter
10-23-2008, 06:15 PM
Hey Mabe (may I call you Mabe?)

I live in Los Angeles, which is about the worst air possible, and I've done really well. Except when my neighborhood has been on fire...like last week! Anyway, although obviously better air is better for you... your indoor air is most important. Sorry, but according to my doctor, no plants (soil has mold, fungi,and carry bacterias like Cepacia).

I was declining rapidly, but when I treated the asthma component to CF with appropriate meds and supplements, improved my environment, added exercise, better diet, my CF reversed course completely. Within 2 years my base FEV1 went from mid 30's to low 50's. It even went up in this past year as I've added a few new things to my regimen. When I "fall off the wagon" I get into trouble.

I've posted about this before Mabe, if you are interested. We'll stretch your 10 years to 20 and beyond!

Nightwriter
10-23-2008, 06:15 PM
Hey Mabe (may I call you Mabe?)
<br />
<br />I live in Los Angeles, which is about the worst air possible, and I've done really well. Except when my neighborhood has been on fire...like last week! Anyway, although obviously better air is better for you... your indoor air is most important. Sorry, but according to my doctor, no plants (soil has mold, fungi,and carry bacterias like Cepacia).
<br />
<br />I was declining rapidly, but when I treated the asthma component to CF with appropriate meds and supplements, improved my environment, added exercise, better diet, my CF reversed course completely. Within 2 years my base FEV1 went from mid 30's to low 50's. It even went up in this past year as I've added a few new things to my regimen. When I "fall off the wagon" I get into trouble.
<br />
<br />I've posted about this before Mabe, if you are interested. We'll stretch your 10 years to 20 and beyond!

mabusincarnate
10-24-2008, 04:59 PM
Odd events....

It seems the less I care about my job, the higher they want to promote me. It's just like Office Space.

I got an email from my manager about "leads training." It's a 2 month training class they want me to take before they promote me to senior analyst. They only selected 3 people for the class.

WTF, right? I wanna quit and they wanna promote me.

I'm gonna do it for lack of anything better. I don't hate the job itself, just the idea of being bored forever. This will keep me entertained until I find what I'm really looking for.

I'm baffled by the way the world works sometimes.

mabusincarnate
10-24-2008, 04:59 PM
Odd events....

It seems the less I care about my job, the higher they want to promote me. It's just like Office Space.

I got an email from my manager about "leads training." It's a 2 month training class they want me to take before they promote me to senior analyst. They only selected 3 people for the class.

WTF, right? I wanna quit and they wanna promote me.

I'm gonna do it for lack of anything better. I don't hate the job itself, just the idea of being bored forever. This will keep me entertained until I find what I'm really looking for.

I'm baffled by the way the world works sometimes.

mabusincarnate
10-24-2008, 04:59 PM
Odd events....

It seems the less I care about my job, the higher they want to promote me. It's just like Office Space.

I got an email from my manager about "leads training." It's a 2 month training class they want me to take before they promote me to senior analyst. They only selected 3 people for the class.

WTF, right? I wanna quit and they wanna promote me.

I'm gonna do it for lack of anything better. I don't hate the job itself, just the idea of being bored forever. This will keep me entertained until I find what I'm really looking for.

I'm baffled by the way the world works sometimes.

mabusincarnate
10-24-2008, 04:59 PM
Odd events....

It seems the less I care about my job, the higher they want to promote me. It's just like Office Space.

I got an email from my manager about "leads training." It's a 2 month training class they want me to take before they promote me to senior analyst. They only selected 3 people for the class.

WTF, right? I wanna quit and they wanna promote me.

I'm gonna do it for lack of anything better. I don't hate the job itself, just the idea of being bored forever. This will keep me entertained until I find what I'm really looking for.

I'm baffled by the way the world works sometimes.

mabusincarnate
10-24-2008, 04:59 PM
Odd events....
<br />
<br />It seems the less I care about my job, the higher they want to promote me. It's just like Office Space.
<br />
<br />I got an email from my manager about "leads training." It's a 2 month training class they want me to take before they promote me to senior analyst. They only selected 3 people for the class.
<br />
<br />WTF, right? I wanna quit and they wanna promote me.
<br />
<br />I'm gonna do it for lack of anything better. I don't hate the job itself, just the idea of being bored forever. This will keep me entertained until I find what I'm really looking for.
<br />
<br />I'm baffled by the way the world works sometimes.

Nightwriter
10-24-2008, 06:16 PM
There's an old saying:

People make plans, and God laughs.

(can still be appreciated even if your name is mabusincarnate)

Nightwriter
10-24-2008, 06:16 PM
There's an old saying:

People make plans, and God laughs.

(can still be appreciated even if your name is mabusincarnate)

Nightwriter
10-24-2008, 06:16 PM
There's an old saying:

People make plans, and God laughs.

(can still be appreciated even if your name is mabusincarnate)

Nightwriter
10-24-2008, 06:16 PM
There's an old saying:

People make plans, and God laughs.

(can still be appreciated even if your name is mabusincarnate)

Nightwriter
10-24-2008, 06:16 PM
There's an old saying:
<br />
<br />People make plans, and God laughs.
<br />
<br />(can still be appreciated even if your name is mabusincarnate)

dbtoo
10-25-2008, 12:48 AM
<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://blogs.cysticfibrosis.com/blogpost.cfm?threadid=32641&catid=1953">Living for today, preparing for a tomorrow. </a>

dbtoo
10-25-2008, 12:48 AM
<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://blogs.cysticfibrosis.com/blogpost.cfm?threadid=32641&catid=1953">Living for today, preparing for a tomorrow. </a>

dbtoo
10-25-2008, 12:48 AM
<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://blogs.cysticfibrosis.com/blogpost.cfm?threadid=32641&catid=1953">Living for today, preparing for a tomorrow. </a>

dbtoo
10-25-2008, 12:48 AM
<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://blogs.cysticfibrosis.com/blogpost.cfm?threadid=32641&catid=1953">Living for today, preparing for a tomorrow. </a>

dbtoo
10-25-2008, 12:48 AM
<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://blogs.cysticfibrosis.com/blogpost.cfm?threadid=32641&catid=1953">Living for today, preparing for a tomorrow. </a>

Genevieve
10-25-2008, 01:01 PM
I'm so glad I found this website, what a relief.

This is my frothy story... <a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://spitthappens.blogspot.c.../my-frothy-story.html
">http://spitthappens.blogspot.c.../my-frothy-story.html
</a>
The doctor said I might live to be 50, I only hope and pray I will live longer and get healthier, I still believe in miracles.

I'd really appreciate any hope or feedback, I've really been struggling and I've found alot of people do not have patience for this disease other than those who are struggling with the same.
Thank you so much for this website.

Genevieve
10-25-2008, 01:01 PM
I'm so glad I found this website, what a relief.

This is my frothy story... <a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://spitthappens.blogspot.c.../my-frothy-story.html
">http://spitthappens.blogspot.c.../my-frothy-story.html
</a>
The doctor said I might live to be 50, I only hope and pray I will live longer and get healthier, I still believe in miracles.

I'd really appreciate any hope or feedback, I've really been struggling and I've found alot of people do not have patience for this disease other than those who are struggling with the same.
Thank you so much for this website.

Genevieve
10-25-2008, 01:01 PM
I'm so glad I found this website, what a relief.

This is my frothy story... <a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://spitthappens.blogspot.c.../my-frothy-story.html
">http://spitthappens.blogspot.c.../my-frothy-story.html
</a>
The doctor said I might live to be 50, I only hope and pray I will live longer and get healthier, I still believe in miracles.

I'd really appreciate any hope or feedback, I've really been struggling and I've found alot of people do not have patience for this disease other than those who are struggling with the same.
Thank you so much for this website.

Genevieve
10-25-2008, 01:01 PM
I'm so glad I found this website, what a relief.

This is my frothy story... <a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://spitthappens.blogspot.c.../my-frothy-story.html
">http://spitthappens.blogspot.c.../my-frothy-story.html
</a>
The doctor said I might live to be 50, I only hope and pray I will live longer and get healthier, I still believe in miracles.

I'd really appreciate any hope or feedback, I've really been struggling and I've found alot of people do not have patience for this disease other than those who are struggling with the same.
Thank you so much for this website.

Genevieve
10-25-2008, 01:01 PM
I'm so glad I found this website, what a relief.
<br />
<br />This is my frothy story... <a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://spitthappens.blogspot.c.../my-frothy-story.html
">http://spitthappens.blogspot.c.../my-frothy-story.html
</a><br />
<br />The doctor said I might live to be 50, I only hope and pray I will live longer and get healthier, I still believe in miracles.
<br />
<br />I'd really appreciate any hope or feedback, I've really been struggling and I've found alot of people do not have patience for this disease other than those who are struggling with the same.
<br />Thank you so much for this website.
<br />